Macomb Science Leadership Council

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Macomb Science Leadership Council. March 17, 2014 Happy St. Patricks Day. Welcome!. What is the most important take-away from K-12 science?. A: Elementary Teacher B: Secondary Teacher C: Coordinator/Teacher Leader D: Building Administrator E: Central Office Administrator. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Welcome to our Science Vertical Team Meeting

March 17, 2014Happy St. Patricks Day

Macomb Science Leadership Council

Welcome!

What is the most important take-away from K-12 science?

A: Elementary TeacherB: Secondary TeacherC: Coordinator/Teacher LeaderD: Building AdministratorE: Central Office AdministratorMacomb Science Leadership CouncilThe purpose of this group is to provide professional learning, support, and networking opportunities for district-level science curriculum and instruction leaders in Macomb County.

Our work will center on supporting districts as we plan for the Next Generation Science Standards.

What is your current level of understanding of the Next Generation Science Standards?A: NGSS Jedi: I am very familiar with the NGSS expectations and am already shifting my practice to meet them. B: NGSS Journeyman: Ive attended some PD.Im in the process of learning what to do.

C: NGSS Apprentice: I know theyre coming, but Im not really sure what that means for teaching and learning yet

D: NGSS What?: We have new standards??

What is your most memorable science learning experience? (Formal or informal)

Objectives for todayNGSS Update: Explore the vision and structure of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)Examine the shifts in instructional practice prescribed by the NGSS Getting Started in your District:Developing a visionSharing:What are you already doing?What are your needs?

Thriving in times of changeIt is unreasonable to ask a professional to change much more than 10 percent a year, but it is unprofessional to change by much less than 10 percent a year. ~Steven Leinwand

ArchitectureShifting Instructional PracticeNGSS UpdatesFist to Five on NGSS7GLCENGSSP.EN.03.21 Demonstrate that light travels in a straight path and that shadows are made by placing an object in a path of light.

P.EN.03.22 Observe what happens to light when it travels from air to water.1-PS4-3. Plan and conduct an investigation to determine the effect of placing objects made with different materials in the path of a beam of light.

MS-PS4.2. Develop and use a model to describe that waves are reflected, absorbed, or transmitted through various materials.Grade Level Content Expectations and NGSSGLCENGSSP.EN.03.21 Demonstrate that light travels in a straight path and that shadows are made by placing an object in a path of light.

P.EN.03.22 Observe what happens to light when it travels from air to water.1-PS4-3. Plan and conduct an investigation to determine the effect of placing objects made with different materials in the path of a beam of light.

MS-PS4.2. Develop and use a model to describe that waves are reflected, absorbed, or transmitted through various materials.Grade Level Content Expectations and NGSSHSCENGSSP4.8e Given an angle of incidence and indices of refraction of two materials, calculate the path of a light ray incident on the boundary (Snells Law).

P4.9B Explain how various materials reflect, absorb, or transmit light in different ways.HS-PS4-1. Use mathematical representations to support a claim regarding relationships among the frequency, wavelength, and speed of waves traveling in various media.High School Content Expectations and NGSSHSCENGSSP4.8e Given an angle of incidence and indices of refraction of two materials, calculate the path of a light ray incident on the boundary (Snells Law).

P4.9B Explain how various materials reflect, absorb, or transmit light in different ways.HS-PS4-1. Use mathematical representations to support a claim regarding relationships among the frequency, wavelength, and speed of waves traveling in various media.High School Content Expectations and NGSSArchitecture of the NGSSWhat do you see?

What do you think is going on?

What does it make you wonder?

Architecture of the NGSS: Performance Expectations

Performance Expectations:

These describe what a student should be able to do at the end of a unit

They are not meant to be lesson sequences or required activities

Architecture of the NGSS: 3 Dimensions

Science and Engineering PracticesCrosscutting ConceptsDisciplinary Core IdeasArchitecture of the NGSS: An Analogy to Cooking

Cooking SkillsSeasoning, flavor profileQuality Ingredients

Architecture of the NGSS: Connections

Connections to:

Other content/grade-bands within the NGSS

Common Core State Standards for ELA/Literacy and MathematicsNGSS Resourceshttp://www.nextgenscience.org/next-generation-science-standards

Whats happening with MDE?December 2014: Anticipated State Board of Education adoption

5-7 year implementation timelineNOTE: this info is subject to change..So I guess we have to focus on the practice standards now..what does that look like?

Science and Engineering PracticesAsking questions (science ) and defining problems (engineering)Developing and using models Planning and carrying out investigations Analyzing and interpreting data Using mathematics and computational thinking Constructing explanations (for science) and designing solutions (for engineering) Engaging in argument from evidence Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information What do scientists do?They approach problems in many different ways and with many different preconceptions. There is no single scientific method universally employed by all. Scientists use a wide array of methods to develop hypotheses, models, and formal and informal theories. They also use different methods to assess the fruitfulness of their theories and to refine their models, explanations, and theories. They use a range of techniques to collect data systematically and a variety of tools to enhance their observations, measurements, and data analyses and representations.-excerpt from Ready, Set, Science

Orchestra students are musicians;

students on the basketball team are athletes;

what opportunities do our science students have to be scientists?

In other words, if orchestra students are musicians, and students on the basketball team are athletes, are our science students scientists?

Pause the video as you consider this question with your group.22

Our shift in thinkingAsking questions and defining problemsDeveloping and using modelsPlanning and carrying out investigationsAnalyzing and interpreting dataUsing mathematics and computational thinkingConstructing explanations and designing solutionsEngaging in argument from evidenceObtaining, evaluating and communicating information

From thinking that one scientific method fits allTo thinking about how to engage our students in the practices of scientistsChapter one of most textbooks goes away23Our shift in thinking

From thinking that hands-on science is ESSENTIALTo thinking that engaging students EVERY DAY in scientific practices and thinking is POWERFUL24A new model for the practice of science

Asking questions and defining problemsDeveloping and using modelsPlanning and carrying out investigationsAnalyzing and interpreting dataUsing mathematics and computational thinkingConstructing explanations and designing solutionsEngaging in argument from evidenceObtaining, evaluating and communicating informationShifting our practiceFromHow am I going to teach this?

ToHow are students going to learn about this?

Shift from Teacher Centered to Student Centered26Shifts in Instructional PracticeAsking questions (science ) and defining problems (engineering)Developing and using models Planning and carrying out investigations Analyzing and interpreting data Using mathematics and computational thinking Constructing explanations (for science) and designing solutions (for engineering) Engaging in argument from evidence Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information Content

Experimentation

Scientific Models

Social Interactions27ContentExperimentationScientific ModelsSocial InteractionsShifts in PracticeShifts in practiceContent

Conventional Science InstructionShifts in Practice for NGSSShifts in Practice: Content

Michigan Force and Motion High School Content ExpectationsNGSS Force and Motion Disciplinary Core IdeasForce and Motion High School Content ExpectationsShifts in Practice: Content

mile wide and an inch deep The Michigan content expectations asked us to teach a curriculum that is a mile wide and an inch deep. Students had to know so many different details and facts.31Force and Motion NGSS (Disciplinary Core Ideas)Shifts in Practice: Content

Deeper instruction focused on core ideasThe NGSS has narrowed the content to core ideas but with the idea that these core ideas are taught along with the other 2 dimensions the Science and Engineering Practices and the Crosscutting Concepts. The content may have gotten smaller, but that just made room for a deeper learning experience that does a better job of reflecting what scientists do. 32Force and Motion NGSSShifts in Practice: Content

Deeper instruction focused on core ideasWhen you look at the entire NGSS document on Force and Motion, its not shorter than the Michigan High School Content Expectations, but the smaller list of concepts is woven together with the Science and Engineering Practices and the Crosscutting Concepts. 33Conventional Science InstructionShifts in Practice for NGSSMEAP QuestionPill bugs can often be found underneath rocks and rotting logs. When exposed to light, they immediately try to find a dark place to hide. This reaction by the pill bugs is a result of A migration. B feeding behavior. C energy requirements. D changing environmental conditions.

NGSS Performance ExpectationUse a model to describe that animals receive different types of information through their senses, process the information in their brain, and respond to the information in different ways.Shifts in Practice: ContentConventional Science InstructionShifts in Practice for NGSSOverwhelming focus of instruction and assessment is content mastery

Learning objectives attend to a broad and comprehensive content coverageFewer concepts are emphasized and explored in depth

Interrelationships of ideas and crosscutting concepts are emphasized

Content is put to use to generate and investigate questions or solve problems

Assessment centers on the use of knowledge and proficiency of the science practicesShifts in Practice: ContentContentHow might you shift your practice?

Shifts in practiceExperimentation

Shifts in Practice: Experimentation

Shifts in Practice: ExperimentationConventional Science InstructionHow does the period of the pendulum depend on the amplitude of the swing? Be sure to keep the mass and length constant Click on the button on the lower right which will activate the photogate timer Set the amplitude to 50o and start the pendulum. Start the photogate timer this will automatically stop itself when it has recorded the time for one complete swing (period) Enter the amplitude and period in excel be sure to label the top of each column and the correct units Continue to take readings for 40o, 30o and so on down to 10o Highlight the columns on your spreadsheet and insert a scatter plot of your results. Choose a chart layout that will allow you to give the graph a title and label the axes with complete units Click on the chart itself and look for the layout tab Open the trendline option and then open more trendline options Select linear trendline, and display equation and r2 on graph Try other trendline options, (exponential, etc) until you find the one with an r2 value closest to 1 Save the table, graph and trendline information

Shifts in Practice for NGSSWhat questions do you have about the motion of a pendulum?

How might you use this simulation to answer your questions?

What kind of models might you develop to represent the motion of the pendulum?Shifts in Practice: Experimentation

ExperimentationConventionalSeparate Unit on the Scientific MethodThen spend the rest of the year learning content through lecture and text resources.

Shifts in Practice: ExperimentationConventional Science Instruction

Students read the text to learn vocabulary and background information about clouds.

?Students then observe the cloud in a jar that confirms what they already know.Shifts in Practice: ExperimentationShifts in Practice for NGSS

Students search for answers to their questions as they read the text.

?Students ask questions about cloud formation and do some investigating on their own.5E with early emphasis on Exploration43Conventional Science InstructionShifts in Practice for NGSSA science course begins with a unit on the scientific method

Hands-on science instruction is used to demonstrate facts of science and thereby reinforce concept mastery

Clear directions are provided for experimentsScientific investigations are designed to generate evidence and answer and inspire questions

Students have the opportunity to invent and/or evaluate approaches to investigations

Revisions to investigative approaches and multiple attempts are routineShifts in Practice: ExperimentationExperimentationHow might you shift your practice?

Shifts in practiceScientific Models

Conventional Science InstructionShifts in Practice for NGSSShifts in Practice: Scientific Models

From IRIS Seismology Research site47Conventional Science InstructionShifts in Practice for NGSSShifts in Practice: Scientific Models

Move from giving the model to developing the model48Conventional Science InstructionShifts in Practice for NGSSTeacher provides formulas:

Students use formulas to get answers:Students observe the motion of a car going down a hillShifts in Practice: Scientific Modelsv = vo + atx = xo + vot + at2A roller coaster car starts at the top of a hill with an initial velocity of 3 m/s. If the acceleration down the hill is 4.5 m/s2, and the hill is 20 m long, how long will it take to get to the bottom of the hill? How fast will it be going?

Calculations can be a black box memorization issue. So much more powerful if developed49Shifts in Practice: Scientific ModelsStudents create graphical and mathematical models of the motion

Students apply these models to new situations

A roller coaster car starts at the top of a hill with an initial velocity of 3 m/s. If the acceleration down the hill is 4.5 m/s2, and the hill is 20 m long, how long will it take to get to the bottom of the hill? How fast will it be going?v = vo + atx = xo + vot + at2

For many it will be the first time they really understand the connection between the math and the science.50Conventional Science InstructionShifts in Practice for NGSSPhysical models are the main type explored by students and they are used to help conceive of scientific ideas

Mathematical formulas are used to find answersModels are designed and used to generate evidence, test ideas, and make predictions

Students have the opportunity to build mathematical modelsShif...

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