Improving Your Mentoring Relationship Mentor Handbook May 2010 CORPORATE LEADERSHIP COUNCIL ® HR LEADERSHIP COUNCIL ®

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  • Slide 1
  • Improving Your Mentoring Relationship Mentor Handbook May 2010 CORPORATE LEADERSHIP COUNCIL HR LEADERSHIP COUNCIL
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  • 2 IMPROVING YOUR MENTORING RELATIONSHIPMENTOR HANDBOOK Corporate Leadership Council HR Leadership Council 2010 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. NOTE TO MEMBERS This project was researched and written to fulfill the research request of several members of The Corporate Executive Board Company and as a result may not satisfy the information needs of all member companies. The Corporate Executive Board Company encourages members who have additional questions about this topic to contact the Member Support Center at EXBD_Support_HR@executiveboard.com for further discussion. The views expressed herein by third-party sources do not necessarily reflect the policies of the organizations they represent. PROFESSIONAL SERVICES NOTE The HR Leadership Council (HRLC) has worked to ensure the accuracy of the information it provides to its members. This project relies upon data obtained from many sources, however, and HRLC cannot guarantee the accuracy of the information or its analysis in all cases. Furthermore, HRLC is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting, or other professional services. Its projects should not be construed as professional advice on any particular set of facts or circumstances. Members requiring such services are advised to consult an appropriate professional. Neither The Corporate Executive Board Company nor its programs are responsible for any claims or losses that may arise from any errors or omissions in their reports, whether caused by The Corporate Executive Board Company or its sources.EXBD_Support_HR@executiveboard.com CORPORATE LEADERSHIP COUNCIL HR LEADERSHIP COUNCIL Research Associate Sneha Srivastava Senior Research Analyst Rachel Kiselewich Managing Director Brian Kropp Senior Director George Penn
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  • 3 IMPROVING YOUR MENTORING RELATIONSHIPMENTOR HANDBOOK Corporate Leadership Council HR Leadership Council 2010 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. Build the Relationship Maintain the Relationship Evaluate the Relationship Understand the Value
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  • 4 IMPROVING YOUR MENTORING RELATIONSHIPMENTOR HANDBOOK Corporate Leadership Council HR Leadership Council 2010 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. User Guide How to Use: Step 1: Prior to meeting with your Mentee, review the contained information. Step 2: Formulate your own ideas of what you would like to get out of this relationship, using the Pre-Meeting Thought Document located on page 13. Step 3: Refer to this guide consistently throughout your mentoring relationship to clarify your role, guide your conversations, communicate effectively with your Mentee, and ensure that you are maintaining a mutually beneficial relationship. Purpose: The purpose of this handbook is to provide you with critical, easy-to-use information that will help you get the most out of your mentoring relationship and be the most effective Mentor that you can be. It will guide you through establishing, maintaining, and evaluating your mentoring relationship so that you can capitalize on its benefits. Audience: This handbook is designed to be used by employees who are mentoring others within their organization.
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  • 5 IMPROVING YOUR MENTORING RELATIONSHIPMENTOR HANDBOOK Corporate Leadership Council HR Leadership Council 2010 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. Table of Contents UNDERSTAND THE VALUE Connect with Colleagues to Accelerate Your PerformancePage 6 Derive Organizational and Personal Benefits from MentoringPage 7 Recognize What Mentoring Is and Is Not Page 8 Identify the Differences Between Mentoring and CoachingPage 9 BUILD THE RELATIONSHIP Establish the Relationship TimelinePage 10 Understand Your Role as a MentorPage 11 Establish Expectations of Your Mentees Role in the RelationshipPage 12 Define Your Goals for the Mentoring RelationshipPage 13 Create the Foundation for a Trusting RelationshipPage 14 MAINTAIN THE RELATIONSHIP Build an Action PlanPage 15 Identify Effective Discussion TopicsPage 16 Identify Effective Mentoring ActivitiesPage 17 Foster an Effective Relationship Page 18 EVALUATE THE RELATIONSHIP Assess the Relationships SuccessPage 19
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  • 6 IMPROVING YOUR MENTORING RELATIONSHIPMENTOR HANDBOOK Corporate Leadership Council HR Leadership Council 2010 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. Understand the Value Connect with Colleagues to Accelerate Your Performance 1 CLC Human Resources, Realizing the Full Potential of Rising Talent (Volume I), Washington, D.C.: Corporate Executive Board, 2005, p. 63. UNDERSTAND THE VALUE BUILD THE RELATIONSHIP MAINTAIN THE RELATIONSHIP EVALUATE THE RELATIONSHIP Key Characteristics of Internal Networks That Impact Employee Potential 1 Internal networks are critical to accelerating performance. Job-focused, information-rich networks have a tremendous impact on improving your potential to be promoted to, and succeed at, the next level within the organization. Mentoring employees with the following characteristics will allow you to garner these benefits, as detailed below: Colleague Characteristics That Drive Potential Maximum Impact on Potential
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  • 7 IMPROVING YOUR MENTORING RELATIONSHIPMENTOR HANDBOOK Corporate Leadership Council HR Leadership Council 2010 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. Derive Organizational and Personal Benefits from Mentoring Effective mentoring programs benefit the Mentor and the organization by promoting a development culture, increasing knowledge sharing, driving performance, and expanding networks, as detailed below: Benefits to the Mentor Drives self-awareness Expands the Mentors professional network Improves leadership skills Increases awareness of available talent throughout the organization Increases likelihood of receiving a promotion Increases visibility throughout the organization 1 U.S. Department of Energy, 2009 Mentoring Program Guide, Office of Learning and Workforce Development Enterprise Training Services Division, http://humancapital.doe.gov/resources/2009-MentorProgGuide-ECollins1-9-09.pdf (2009). http://humancapital.doe.gov/resources/2009-MentorProgGuide-ECollins1-9-09.pdf 2 Triple Creek Associates, Mentorings Impact on Mentors, http://www.3creek.com/resources/research/Mentor_Impact.pdf (2007).http://www.3creek.com/resources/research/Mentor_Impact.pdf Benefits to the Organization Builds bench strength Creates a culture of development Drives employee engagement and retention Fosters productivity and performance Increases cross-organizational communication Provides a low-cost development opportunity UNDERSTAND THE VALUE BUILD THE RELATIONSHIP MAINTAIN THE RELATIONSHIP EVALUATE THE RELATIONSHIP Benefits of Mentoring to the Mentor, Mentee, and Organization 1,2 Understand the Value Benefits to the Mentee Accelerates development Enhances self-esteem and confidence when interacting with senior leaders Expands the employees professional network Increases job satisfaction and effectiveness Increases likelihood of receiving a promotion Increases perspective and knowledge of different functions
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  • 8 IMPROVING YOUR MENTORING RELATIONSHIPMENTOR HANDBOOK Corporate Leadership Council HR Leadership Council 2010 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. It is important that both you and your Mentee understand what does and does not constitute a mentoring relationship, as detailed below: Recognize What Mentoring Is and Is Not 1 CLC Human Resources, Bell Canadas Online Mentoring Program, Washington, D.C.: Corporate Executive Board, January 2003, p. 2. UNDERSTAND THE VALUE BUILD THE RELATIONSHIP MAINTAIN THE RELATIONSHIP EVALUATE THE RELATIONSHIP Definition of Mentoring 1 Mentoring Is Development ToolIt is a development program that grows knowledge, networks, and careers. The process allows more experienced employees to support and develop other employees. Knowledge Sharing OpportunityIt is a process that improves cross-functional knowledge sharing and facilitates the flow of information and ideas throughout the organization. Organizational Culture EnhancerIt can help employees better understand the organizations operations, policies, and culture. Mentoring Is Not Guarantee of PromotionA mentoring relationship provides no assurance of promotion or increase in compensation. However, both parties may develop competencies and skills that improve overall job performance. Replacement for Formal DevelopmentMentoring cannot take the place of formal training, but rather should augment formal development activities. Management ReplacementThe Mentor should not take on the responsibilities of the Mentees manager. Employee Assistance ProgramMentoring is not an employee assistance program that provides employees with counseling on personal issues. Understand the Value
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  • 9 IMPROVING YOUR MENTORING RELATIONSHIPMENTOR HANDBOOK Corporate Leadership Council HR Leadership Council 2010 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. Mentoring and coaching differ in their objectives, impacts, and durations, as detailed below: Identify the Differences Between Mentoring and Coaching 1 CLC Human Resources, Mentoring Programs, Arlington, VA: Corporate Executive Board, 2009, p. 3. UNDERSTAND THE VALUE BUILD THE RELATIONSHIP MAINTAIN THE RELATIONSHIP EVALUATE THE RELATIONSHIP Differences Between Mentoring and Coaching 1 Understand the Value MentoringCoaching Helps facilitate a culture of growth and development within the organization Assesses and improves an individuals performance in a particular area Concentrates on the individuals development needs and goals based on his/her career aspirations Concentrates on identified issues with clear goals to develop specific skills and behaviors Mutually benefits both the Mentor and Mentee Disproportionately benefits the person being coached Builds a long-term relationship dependent upon participants performance through various career stages Sets a time-bound relationship defined to meet specific goals and objectives
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  • 10 IMPROVING YOUR MENTORING RELATIONSHIPMENTOR HANDBOOK Corporate Leadership Council HR Leadership Council 2010 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. Establish the Relationship Timeline To build an effective mentoring relationship, you must establish what you and your Mentee would like to get out of the relationship, build trust with your Mentee, define an action plan, and then meet on a consistent basis. The initial meetings are critical in setting a strong foundation on which to build the relationship. Information that should be covered before, during, and after these initial meetings is detailed below: UNDERSTAND THE VALUE BUILD THE RELATIONSHIP MAINTAIN THE RELATIONSHIP EVALUATE THE RELATIONSHIP Relationship Project Plan Action ItemsTarget DateCompletion Date Receive Match and Establish Goals and ExpectationsPrior to first meeting Identify your expectations for the mentoring relationship. Define your objectives and goals of the mentoring relationship (see page 13). Hold Introductory Meeting Face-to-FaceFirst meeting Clarify roles and responsibilities (see pages 1112). Share each of your objectives, goals, and expectations of the mentoring relationship (see page 14). Discuss action items to be completed before the next meeting. Create an Action PlanSecond meeting Discuss Mentees strengths and identify short- and long-term development needs.* Complete the Action Plan Template (see page 15). Discuss action items to be completed before the next meeting. Act on and Revise the Action PlanSubsequent meetings Review progress on action items determined at the end of the last meeting. Discuss items of interest, current challenges, recent successes, etc. (see pages 1617). Every four to six months, assess the effectiveness of the relationship (see page 19). Discuss action items to be completed before the next meeting. *Mentee is responsible for bringing his/her past performance reviews and current development plan. Build the Relationship
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  • 11 IMPROVING YOUR MENTORING RELATIONSHIPMENTOR HANDBOOK Corporate Leadership Council HR Leadership Council 2010 The Corporate Executive Board Company. All Rights Reserved. Understand Your Role as a Mentor Spending time at the beginning of the relationship clarifying what you can legitimately expect to give and get through mentoring is essential. It is especially beneficial for the individuals involved to discuss, negotiate, and agree upon expectations. The figure below provides an illustrative list of your roles as a Mentor, effective behaviors, and detracting behaviors: 1 CLC Human Resources, Mentoring Implementation Toolkit, Arlington, VA: Corporate Executive Board, 2008, p. 6. 2 CLC Human Resources, Mentoring Programs, Arlington, VA: Corporate Executive Board, 2009, p. 9. 3 CLC Human Resources, Tools for Executives in Mentoring Programs, Washington, D.C.: Corporate Executive Board, October 2003, p. 9. Effective Mentoring Roles 1,2,3 UNDERSTAND THE VALUE BUILD THE RELATIONSHIP MAINTAIN THE RELATIONSHIP EVALUATE THE RELATIONSHIP Build the Relationship Key RolesEffective BehaviorsIneffective Behaviors Advisor Acts as a sounding board and facilitator Maintains privacy/confidentiality Fixes problems Assumes responsibility for Mentee Protector Supports, is a safety net Ensures a safe environment to take risks Fights Mentees battles Overprotects Developer Gives structure and direction Provides guidance based on observations during interactions with Mentee Empowers Mentee to handle his/her problems independently Dictates, controls learning Looks for quick-fixes Provides general criticism or judgment Tells Mentee what to do Broker Identifies skill or competency gaps through a third party lens Identifies and facilitates development opportunities Allows for personal biases Abdicates, does not follow up Challenger Positively provokes, pushes toward highest standards Helps Mentee explore potential career opportunities Pushes too far too soon Discounts Mentees thoughts and opinions Clarifier Teaches organizational values and politics Removes obstacles so Mentee does not have to deal with organizational politics Affirmer Gives needed support, enhances self-esteem Exhibits empathy and understanding Gives too much feedback Discounts Mentees feelings or concerns Sponsor Provides visibility and recognition of Mentee Promotes Mentee at the expense of others
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  • 12 IMPROVING YOUR MENTORING RELATIONSHIPMENTOR HANDBOOK Corporate Leadership Council HR Leadership Council 2010 The Corporate Execu...

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