immerse, imagine, invent and articulate: a framework for disruptive innovation

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  • 1. Immerse, Imagine, Invent & Articulate A framework for disruptive innovation Presented by Paul-Jervis Heath at UX Cambridge on Wednesday 4 September 2013.MH ModernHuman.

2. Hello! Im most at home in a design studio. Ive spent 15 years designing services and digital products for big, international clients and small, disruptive start-ups. Im Principal of a design practice and innovation consultancy called Modern Human; I lead the team there. Im also Head of Innovation at the University, while we establish an innovation centre. We use human-centred design to help businesses invent their future. Weve worked in lots of dierent sectors and done lots of dierent design projects such as in-car information systems, smart home appliances, concepts for retail stores of the future, established an innovation practice at University of Cambridge, and lots of other things. 3. Todays workshop squeezes a week of our innovation intensive course into 3 hours. Inevitably, weve left quite a lot out but I hope today will give you some useful skills to take back to work and a taste of that course. Photo credit Flickr user andreaskopp - http://bit.ly/12yywna 4. Standing out from the crowd is never easy 5. Product PerformanceDisruptionTimeSource: The Innovators Dilemma, Clayton Christensen. (1997). 6. Disruptive thinking does not rely on the invention of disruptive technology. 7. Satisedt enPe rfo rm anceme cit ExLow InvestmentHigh InvestmentBasicDissatisedSource: Attractive quality and must-be quality - Journal of the Japanese Society for Quality Control (in Japanese), Noriaki Kano, (1984) 8. Satisedt enPe rfo rm anceme cit ExLow InvestmentHigh InvestmentBasicDissatisedSource: Attractive quality and must-be quality - Journal of the Japanese Society for Quality Control (in Japanese), Noriaki Kano, (1984) 9. The rate of adoption is accelerating89 years38 years14 years(Time to Reach 150 Million Users)7years5years 10. Immerse ArticulateImagine Invent Entypo Pictograms by Daniel Bruce - http://entypo.com. 11. Everyone can use creative techniques to solve business challenges. Photo credit Flickr user asadotzler - http://bit.ly/15sTd0V 12. Photo credit Flickr user djking - http://bit.ly/13ObNXf 13. Immerse 14. Focus groups are not design research. 15. Usability testing is vital but it will not uncover users needs. 16. What are we looking for? Workarounds: Quick, seemingly ecient solutions that address the symptoms of a problem not the root cause. Values: Peoples values play an important role in their motivations. What do they value? Whats important to them? Whats not? Inertia: Situations in which customers act out of habit. How can you leverage or break that inertia? Shoulds vs. Wants: People struggle with the tension between wants: things they crave in the moment; and shoulds: things they know are good for them in the long term. How can you help people move from where they are to where they want to be? 17. Early AdopterEarly MajorityLate MajorityLaggardsAdapted from: Diusion of Innovations, Everett M Rogers. (1962). Crossing the Chasm, Georey Moore. (1991). 18. Early AdopterEarly MajorityLate MajorityLaggardsAdapted from: Diusion of Innovations, Everett M Rogers. (1962). Crossing the Chasm, Georey Moore. (1991). 19. What did you nd out? Close your laptop and revert to low-tech methods for analysis! It moves you out of your own normal situation. Write each observation on a post-it note (get some rectangular post-its for this). Print out all the photos you took. Build an insight board of all of the post-its and photos. Anity Sort: organise it into themes. Code your observations. This all lays the groundwork for recognising insights. Observations are raw data. Insights are the interpretation of patterns in your observations. 20. Look for the unexpected and ask, why? Dont try and think about everything at once. Find a good place to start. Dont focus on the obvious. Theres a risk that you just conrm your own preconceptions and prejudices. Start with unexpected observations. Why is this a pattern? Why is it unexpected? Why is it meaningful? 21. Insight: A common failure of cleaning oors is not a lack of water but an excess of water that causes water to slop dirt around. Clich: People use mops with water to clean oors Hypothesis: What if mops did not use water Opportunity: Provide people at home [who] with a faster way to clean oors [advantage] without using water [gap]. Photo credit Flickr user Chiots Run - http://bit.ly/16ZgcVw 22. Just your team? Recruit some users, or go out and nd them guerrilla style. Immerse yourselves: diary study, shadowing, contextual interviews. Analyse the ndings; look for the opportunities. 23. or, involving everyone. Train & Facilitate: Teach others how to be the researchers. Have them go out and immerse themselves through contextual research. Work with them to structure the study and get together to analyse the ndings and insights. Open: Ask people to submit their own observations and insights on a challenge using an Open Innovation platform. At Modern Human use our own platform to manage innovation challenges for our clients. 24. Photo credit Flickr user djking - http://bit.ly/13ObNXf 25. Imagine 26. 3 questions: 1. What do you want to disrupt? 2. What are the clichs? 3. What are your disruptive hypotheses?Adapted from: Disrupt: Think the unthinkable to spark transformation in you business, 2010, Luke Williams. 27. What do you want to disrupt? How do you meaningfully dierentiate this product or service from everyone else in the same space? What situation are you going to challenge? For example, -This is an area where prot performance is average it really should be more successful than it is.-This is a category where growth is slow and everything seems the same.-It boils down to How can we disrupt the by delivering an expected solutionAdapted from: Disrupt: Think the unthinkable to spark transformation in you business, 2010, Luke Williams. 28. Wii: How Nintendo challenged everyones perceptions of Video Games. Photo credit Flickr user lincolnblues - http://bit.ly/1dC6LBm 29. Searching for clichs ProductInteractionPricingAdapted from: Disrupt: Think the unthinkable to spark transformation in you business, 2010, Luke Williams. 30. Forming a disruptive hypothesisInvertScaleDenyAdapted from: Disrupt: Think the unthinkable to spark transformation in you business, 2010, Luke Williams. 31. Source: Disrupt: Think the unthinkable to spark transformation in you business, 2010, Luke Williams. 32. Source: Disrupt: Think the unthinkable to spark transformation in you business, 2010, Luke Williams. 33. Source: Disrupt: Think the unthinkable to spark transformation in you business, 2010, Luke Williams. 34. Photo credit Flickr user djking - http://bit.ly/13ObNXf 35. Lets try it out. 30-minsOpen the brieng pack, read the contents. What disruptive intervention could you make?How could you invert, deny or scale those clichs? Try inverting, denying or scaling each of your clichs.What would be your disruptive hypotheses? Identify the strongest 3 as your disruptive hypothesis.Tell us about it! Take the rest of the room through your thinking in a 5-minute presentation.What are the clichs in that industry, and about that experience? Generate 12-18 cliches about that experience. 36. Brainstorming gives ideation a bad name. 37. Quantity of ideas people come up with in a brainstormx2Quantity of ideas people come up when working aloneSource: Does Group Participation When Using Brainstorming Facilitate or Inhibit Creative Thinking? Administrative Science Quarterly. Taylor, Berry & Block, 1958. 38. 20% Using traditional brainstormingmoreEncouraged to discuss and critique each others ideasSource: The liberating role of conict in group creativity: A study in two countries. European Journal of Social Psychology, Nemeth et al, 2003 39. You can discover more abouta person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. Plato: Greek Philosopher, Mathematician & Student Of Socrates 40. Six Eight Five 41. Rapid Ideation What?One reason teams end up with under-developed ideas is that we stick with the rst good idea we have, rather than taking the time to explore complementary approaches.This game combats that pattern by forcing us to generate lots of ideas in a short period of time.Take 8 sticky notesYou have 5 minutes from when I say go to sketch 6 to 8 ideas.Well play 4 rounds.After each round Ill ask you to present your ideas to the group very briey (2 minutes each).The idea in each round is to either generate new ideas, build on your own ideas or build on ideas of other people. Source: Gamestorming: A playbook for innovators, rulebreakers and changemakers. 2010. Gray, Brown and Macanufo. 42. Brain Writing 43. Quickly building on ideas What?In a space visible to the players, write the topic around which you need to generate ideas and draw a quick sketch of it. Take your set of index cards and silently write an idea on each card.Continue this process of brain writing and passing cards to the right until there are various ideas on each card.Pass the rst of your ideas cards to the person on your right. When you receive a card, read the card and think of it as an idea stimulation card. Add an idea inspired by what they just read or to enhance the idea and then pass again to their right.Source: Gamestorming: A playbook for innovators, rulebreakers and changemakers. 2010. Gray, Brown and Macanufo. 44. Heuristic Ideation Technique 45. Interesting Combinations of Attributes Step 1:As a team decide on two sets of attributes that dene a matrix. E.g.Source: Gamestorming: A playbook for innovators, rulebreakers and changemakers. 2010. Gray, Brown and Macanufo. 46. Interesting Combinations of Attributes Step 2:Populate the matrix creating a grid of possible new combinationsStep 3:Do a quick sketc