Happy Birthday CRMC 20 Years!. Happy Birthday 20 + Years!

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<ul><li> Slide 1 </li> <li> Happy Birthday CRMC 20 Years! </li> <li> Slide 2 </li> <li> Happy Birthday 20 + Years! </li> <li> Slide 3 </li> <li> In mathematics there are VARIABLES and CONSTANTS During CRMCs twenty year history there have been many variables, but one constant. Ruby A. Tucker </li> <li> Slide 4 </li> <li> R Responsible: Whatever task was asked of Ruby, I was ALWAYS sure it would be well done. U Unassuming: Ruby is a wonderful unassuming personthere is not a pretentious bone in her body! And she is always ready to give credit to others. B Beautiful spirit: It was a privilege to get to know Ruby. She is a beautiful spirit and is the first to see the beautiful spirit in other, especially children. Y Young at heart. Rubys energy keeps us young at heart Helen P. Collins </li> <li> Slide 5 </li> <li> Whenever I think about my time at CRMC even beyond the PRIME camps the one face I see every time is that of Ruby Tucker- her smile, bright eyes and eager-to-be-of- assistance-demeanor. The thing about Ruby you never really had to ask her to do anything: by the time youd figure out something needed doing, Ruby was always busy getting it done! What a real jewel! Susan Pruet </li> <li> Slide 6 </li> <li> Slide 7 </li> <li> Ruby is CRMC's value-added resource. She has a love and appreciation for the great lessons and activities whose dusty pages might be passed over for the glossy print. Ruby always cheered when I dug out some of my favorite activities on yellowed, faded pages or even purple ditto sheets. She is a champion for the best mathematics for every student. She has cheerfully served as a mentor and coach. She has earned an advanced degree in cutting and pasting and an award for best supporting actress in the Phillips/Tucker Road Show. Ruby's service to the mathematics community proves that the best things in life and at CRMC are free. Thanks, Ruby. Kitty Fouche </li> <li> Slide 8 </li> <li> I was blessed to be able to work alongside Ruby when I came to the Collaborative as the secondary resource teacher. I learned so much from her example then. I am especially blessed, as is everyone associated with the Collaborative that Ruby continues to be a shining example for all of us. She is both a mentor and a friend! Kenneth Jones </li> <li> Slide 9 </li> <li> Ruby A. Tucker PRIME Scholarship This scholarship, administered by the CSU Foundation, will provide financial assistance to help girls with financial need attend PRIME Camp. </li> <li> Slide 10 </li> <li> CRMC First Director Helen Purks Collins 1989-1995, 1998 </li> <li> Slide 11 </li> <li> CRMCthe earliest days </li> <li> Slide 12 </li> <li> 1989: The Ford Foundation $ 8,000 matching grant $ 8,000 matching grant to create a local urban math collaborative </li> <li> Slide 13 </li> <li> 1989: The Ford Foundation Existing Mathematics Collaboratives: Cleveland Cleveland Minneapolis-St. Paul Minneapolis-St. Paul San Francisco San Francisco Philadelphia Philadelphia Los Angeles Los Angeles Pittsburgh Pittsburgh New Orleans New Orleans St. Louis St. Louis Raleigh-Durham Raleigh-Durham Memphis Memphis San Diego San Diego </li> <li> Slide 14 </li> <li> We needed to We needed to write the grantthe original collaborative was for high school teachers write the grantthe original collaborative was for high school teachers enlist area school system support enlist area school system support create a board of business and industry leaders and educators (the collaboration) create a board of business and industry leaders and educators (the collaboration) raise $ 8,000 raise $ 8,000 </li> <li> Slide 15 </li> <li> CADRE of TEACHERS Chattahoochee Council of Teachers of Mathematics, NCTM affiliate </li> <li> Slide 16 </li> <li> Former Mayor Bill Feighner Hosted luncheon Helped develop the board Gene Demonet,Chairman of the Board Frank Brown Jim Ballengee John Boland Joyce Lee Glenn Vaughn Rolla Baumgartner Bob Bushong </li> <li> Slide 17 </li> <li> Now what? </li> <li> Slide 18 </li> <li> Birds of a Feather </li> <li> Slide 19 </li> <li> Ford Foundation $10,000NRM </li> <li> Slide 20 </li> <li> C to Shining C Collaborative to Shining Collaborative $10,000 Travel Grant </li> <li> Slide 21 </li> <li> PRIME Positive Reinforcement in Mathematics Education Kitt Lumley Ruby Tucker </li> <li> Slide 22 </li> <li> Woodrow Wilson Foundation Pam Coffield Statistics and Data Analysis Geometry </li> <li> Slide 23 </li> <li> Mathematical Modeling Business and Industry Mathematicians Mathematics Teachers </li> <li> Slide 24 </li> <li> Multiple grants per year Multiple grants per year High School Teachers Middle School Elementary </li> <li> Slide 25 </li> <li> The Knight Foundation $30,000 for Prep PRIME Telephone call from Knight Think B I G G E R $250,000 Algebra for All </li> <li> Slide 26 </li> <li> Provided leadership for initiatives for the state of Georgia Project 92 Project 92 SYNERGY SYNERGY </li> <li> Slide 27 </li> <li> CRMC $ 3,511,419.00 </li> <li> Slide 28 </li> <li> Birds of a Feather </li> <li> Slide 29 </li> <li> Improve math education for our students </li> <li> Slide 30 </li> <li> Develop Teacher Leaders CRMC! </li> <li> Slide 31 </li> <li> CRMC Second Director Susan Pruet 1995-1997 1995-1997 </li> <li> Slide 32 </li> <li> CRMC Events 1997-1999 Great New Hires! Great New Hires! Elementary Math/Science Camps Elementary Math/Science Camps MathFest MathFest CSU-Math Department/CRMC grant CSU-Math Department/CRMC grant College Algebra through Mathematical Modeling College Algebra through Mathematical Modeling CRMC moved to Center for Excellence in Math/Science Education (CEMSE) CRMC moved to Center for Excellence in Math/Science Education (CEMSE) </li> <li> Slide 33 </li> <li> My Favorite Problem from Columbus Fractions Food Andughh Dieting Just in time for Thanksgiving! </li> <li> Slide 34 </li> <li> Susans diet allows her to eat pound of turkey breast. She ordered pound of turkey from the local deli. The sales person sliced 3 uniform slices, weighed the slices, and said, This is a third of a pound. So, how many of the 3 turkey slices could Susan eat and stay on her diet and get to eat as much as she is allowed? The Turkey Problem </li> <li> Slide 35 </li> <li> CRMC Third Director Ann Assad 1998-2004 1998-2004 </li> <li> Slide 36 </li> <li> Connecting the Dots: Seeing the Whole Picture Ann Assad Austin Peay State University Clarksville, Tennessee </li> <li> Slide 37 </li> <li> Emerging research and recently published documents guided our work. </li> <li> Slide 38 </li> <li> National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Principles and Standards for School Mathematics (2000) Emphasis on the Process Standards Problem Solving Problem Solving Reasoning and Proof Reasoning and Proof Communication Communication Connections Connections Representation Representation </li> <li> Slide 39 </li> <li> Integration of Six Guiding Principles across the Standards Equity high expectations and strong support for all students. Equity high expectations and strong support for all students. Curriculum a coherent curriculum, well articulated across the grade levels. Curriculum a coherent curriculum, well articulated across the grade levels. Teaching challenging students and supporting their learning. Teaching challenging students and supporting their learning. Learning actively building knowledge through experience and prior knowledge. Learning actively building knowledge through experience and prior knowledge. Assessment providing useful information for both teacher and student. Assessment providing useful information for both teacher and student. Technology influences the mathematics that is taught and enhances students learning. Technology influences the mathematics that is taught and enhances students learning. </li> <li> Slide 40 </li> <li> Education Development Center K-12 Curriculum Summaries (1998, 2005) Provides information about research- based curricula for elementary, middle grades, and high school. Provides information about research- based curricula for elementary, middle grades, and high school. </li> <li> Slide 41 </li> <li> Education Development Center Choosing a Standards-Based Curriculum (2000) Provides guidance in reviewing standards- based curricula and for selecting and implementing curricula. Provides guidance in reviewing standards- based curricula and for selecting and implementing curricula. </li> <li> Slide 42 </li> <li> Based on these documents, along with current research, CRMC developed a vision of P-12 mathematics education that integrated curriculum, teaching, and learning both horizontally (within grade levels) and vertically (between grade levels). </li> <li> Slide 43 </li> <li> The implementation of this vision was the development of three integrated projects funded by Improving Teacher Quality State Grants (formerly Eisenhower). High School Project Middle School Project Early Childhood Project </li> <li> Slide 44 </li> <li> Teachers came together to share and learn. </li> <li> Slide 45 </li> <li> Students and teachers worked together in camps and classrooms. </li> <li> Slide 46 </li> <li> Slide 47 </li> <li> We relentlessly solved problems (and still do). </li> <li> Slide 48 </li> <li> A Question: What is the relationship between the area of a great circle of a sphere and the surface area of the sphere? </li> <li> Slide 49 </li> <li> Slide 50 </li> <li> Slide 51 </li> <li> Slide 52 </li> <li> Data Collected by Students Area of Great Circle (A1) Surface Area of Sphere (A2) Ratio of A2 to A1 520.54.10 22.8883.86 12413.42 3124.00 1.255.254.20 Average3.92 </li> <li> Slide 53 </li> <li> Data Collected by Students Area of Great Circle (A1) Surface Area of Sphere (A2) Ratio of A2 to A1 520.54.10 22.8883.86 12413.42 3124.00 1.255.254.20 Average3.92 </li> <li> Slide 54 </li> <li> Area of a circle A c = r 2 Surface area of a sphere A s = 4 r 2 A s A c = 4 Compare our results to the formulas for area. </li> <li> Slide 55 </li> <li> Some problems to think about. </li> <li> Slide 56 </li> <li> What is the minimum number of angle measures you need to have in order to know the measures of all the angles in the triangles represented here? From Fostering Geometric Thinking: A Guide for Teachers Grades 5-10 by Mark Driscoll </li> <li> Slide 57 </li> <li> Find four points in a plane that can serve as the vertices for two different but congruent quadrilaterals. From Fostering Geometric Thinking: A Guide for Teachers Grades 5-10 by Mark Driscoll </li> <li> Slide 58 </li> <li> CRMC Fourth Director Kitty Fouche 2004-2005 2004-2005 </li> <li> Slide 59 </li> <li> Slide 60 </li> <li> Wrap a string around the blob. Then use the string to form a rectangle. Find the area of the rectangle. This area will be the same as the area of the blob? </li> <li> Slide 61 </li> <li> I would say this was a very creative way to come up with the solution to this problem. I would commend him for his intelligent and creative thinking. I would say this was a very creative way to come up with the solution to this problem. I would commend him for his intelligent and creative thinking. </li> <li> Slide 62 </li> <li> I would say he has definitely understood the concept of area. I would say he has definitely understood the concept of area. </li> <li> Slide 63 </li> <li> I would tell him that his answer was very brilliant and would congratulate him. I would tell him that his answer was very brilliant and would congratulate him. </li> <li> Slide 64 </li> <li> I would say the student was rather ingenious to have thought of the method to find area. It shows hes thinking ahead and knows what he is doing. I would praise him on his work. I would say the student was rather ingenious to have thought of the method to find area. It shows hes thinking ahead and knows what he is doing. I would praise him on his work. </li> <li> Slide 65 </li> <li> First I would comment that he/she has done a good job, and that this way is a possibility. However, there is a simpler way. Simply do what she/he has done to start but a rectangle may be difficult to form. Simply form the string into a square or a triangle or even better simply measure the piece of string on a ruler and the measurement will give you the area. First I would comment that he/she has done a good job, and that this way is a possibility. However, there is a simpler way. Simply do what she/he has done to start but a rectangle may be difficult to form. Simply form the string into a square or a triangle or even better simply measure the piece of string on a ruler and the measurement will give you the area. </li> <li> Slide 66 </li> <li> A very good start Karen! You are on the right track. Isnt that blob shaped more like a circle? (Karen agrees and proceeds to find the area of the circle. A very good start Karen! You are on the right track. Isnt that blob shaped more like a circle? (Karen agrees and proceeds to find the area of the circle. </li> <li> Slide 67 </li> <li> Mouse and Elephant: Measuring Growth Middle Grades Project by Fitzgerald, Phillips, Lappan, Winter, and Shrover </li> <li> Slide 68 </li> <li> Spaghetti and Meatballs for All by Marilyn Burns </li> <li> Slide 69 </li> <li> NCTM Illuminations Lesson Apple Pi </li> <li> Slide 70 </li> <li> A very good start Karen! You are on the right track. Isnt that blob shaped more like a circle? (Karen agrees and proceeds to find the area of the circle. </li> <li> Slide 71 </li> <li> Finding the Area of a Circle: Use a Cake Pan and Leave Out the Pi Arithmetic Teacher May 1986 by Walter Szetela &amp; Douglas T. Owens </li> <li> Slide 72 </li> <li> Method 1 Counting squares </li> <li> Slide 73 </li> <li> Slide 74 </li> <li> Slide 75 </li> <li> Slide 76 </li> <li> Take mean of Underestimate and Overestimate </li> <li> Slide 77 </li> <li> Developing an Area Formula for a Circle with "Goldilocks and the Three Bears" Jerry A. Ameis Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School November 2001, Volume 7, Issue 3, Page 140 </li> <li> Slide 78 </li> <li> Method 2 Inscribed and circumscribed squares </li> <li> Slide 79 </li> <li> Slide 80 </li> <li> Slide 81 </li> <li> Slide 82 </li> <li> Take mean of Underestimate and Overestimate </li> <li> Slide 83 </li> <li> Method 3 Octagonal (Egyptian) method </li> <li> Slide 84 </li> <li> Slide 85 </li> <li> Slide 86 </li> <li> Slide 87 </li> <li> Slide 88 </li> <li> Slide 89 </li> <li> Method 4 Weighing method </li> <li> Slide 90 </li> <li> Method 5 Random numbers </li> <li> Slide 91 </li> <li> Method 6 Parallelogram </li> <li> Slide 92 </li> <li> Slide 93 </li> <li> Slide 94 </li> <li> Slide 95 </li> <li> Slide 96 </li> <li> Slide 97 </li> <li> Slide 98 </li> <li> Slide 99 </li> <li> Slide 100 </li> <li> Slide 101 </li> <li> Slide 102 </li> <li> Area of Rectangle = L W L the circumference L (2 r) W r Area of Rectangle (2 r)r Area of Circle = r 2 </li> <li> Slide 103 </li> <li> Method 7 Marble...</li></ul>