glenohumeral dislocations and humerus fractures

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Anatomy of the Shoulder - The glenohumeral joint is a ball-and-socket joint - The humerus head (the ball) fits into the glenoid of the scapula (socket) - The labrum is the most important piece of cartilage allows humerus to rotate with minimal friction

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Glenohumeral Dislocations and Humerus FracturesNikole Blackwell
- The glenohumeral joint is a ball-and-socket joint
- The humerus head (the ball) fits into the glenoid of the scapula (socket)
- The labrum is the most important piece of cartilage allows humerus to rotate with minimal friction
Glenohumeral Dislocation Causes
Most common is when the head of the humerus is forced in an anterior direction past the labrum.
Anterior dislocation is abduction , external rotation, and extension
Common in football and rugby players
Glenohumeral Dislocation Causes
Initial trauma involving posteriorly directed force to a flexed, adducted, and internally rotated shoulder
Partial dislocation, humerus head is partially out of socket
Glenohumeral Dislocation Signs
with an anterior dislocation an athlete displays flattened deltoid contour
carries arm slightly abducted and in external rotation
Glenohumeral Dislocation Signs
Glenohumeral Dislocation Facts
Non-operative management is favored when dislocation presents fewer than 6 weeks, and less then 20% of humeral head defect
Glenohumeral Dislocation Facts
Rare but occasionally baseball players will suffer from dislocations
One study found traditional rehab was insufficient for 34% of overhead athletes w/ posterior glenohumeral dislocation.
Glenohumeral Dislocation Care
Apply cold packs to prevent hemorrhage
A doctor needs to preform closed reduction to put the arm back in place
Remain in a sling for one week then begin physical therapy
The head of the humerus is part of the shoulder
The radial groove and deltoid tuberosity are part of the humerus shaft
The medial and lateral epicondyles and the olecranon fossa are part of the elbow
Humerus Fracture Causes
Type I- shearing or avulsion forces
Type II- occur same as type I but fracture continues through metaphysis
Type III- vertical fracture lines through epiphysis
Type IV- fracture crosses epiphysis, epiphyseal plate
Type V- comprehensive forces are directed to bone in an uncommon motion
Humerus Fracture causes
Complete fractures result from impaction of proximal ulna onto distal humerus
Impact can occur with elbow flexed or unflexed
Occasionally happen in sports
Humerus Fracture Signs
Pain
Humerus Fracture Facts
Both types of fractures are common in elderly and older adult persons
Fracture patterns are similar across all ages, but older people are more prone due to osteoporosis
Humerus Fracture Care
Immediate application of splint or support with a sling
An athlete with a humerus fracture are out of competition for 2 to 6 months, depending on severity
Distal humerus fractures are mostly treated surgically
Athletes are told to avoid 90/90 positioning
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