DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC MUS 305 Music History I ?· DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC MUS 305 – Music History I Monday,…

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<ul><li><p> Colorado State University Pueblo </p><p>DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC </p><p>MUS 305 Music History I </p><p>Monday, Wednesday, Friday 9:05 a.m. 10:10 a.m. </p><p> 154 Music Center </p><p> 3 credit hours </p><p> COURSE SYLLABUS </p><p>FALL 2015 </p><p>Instructor </p><p>Dr. David Volk Office hours: TBA or by appointment Office: 175B Music Center Phone: (719) 549-2122 Email: david.volk@csupueblo.edu </p><p>Course Description and Course Objectives </p><p>An in-depth study of music history and representative literature from Antiquity to the Classical period. Prerequisites: successful completion of MUS 118 (Music Appreciation), MUS 150 (Music Theory I) and MUS 210 (Music Theory II). By the conclusion of MUS 305, students will have knowledge and expertise in the following: </p><p>1. The stylistic differences of ancient, Medieval, and Renaissance music 2. Knowledge of the principal composers and works of these eras 3. The development of musical form in these periods 4. The historical influences on music in these periods 5. The development of musical notation in these periods 6. Research methodology in Music History appropriate for completion of an </p><p>undergraduate-level research paper in the students major discipline </p><p>Course Rationale </p><p>The course services music majors as the second of two courses encompassing a complete survey of the history of western music. </p><p>Texts The following texts are required: Concise History of Western Music, fourth edition, by Barbara Russano Hanning (Norton) </p><p>Student Responsibilities </p><p>Homework is due at the beginning of the following class period assigned. Full credit will not be given for homework submitted after this deadline unless the student has made approved and prior arrangements with the instructor. Approved and prior arrangements must also be made in order to receive full credit for homework submitted after the deadline due to an absence from class. An exception may be made at the instructors discretion in such cases as extreme illness or an immediate </p><p>mailto:david.volk@csupueblo.edu</p></li><li><p>MUS 4531: Music History I page 2 </p><p>personal emergency that negated the opportunity for prior notification. Refer to the homework grading policy outlined in the Evaluation section of this syllabus. Daily quizzes are given during the first five minutes of class. Quizzes missed for tardies or absences may not be retaken. </p><p>Methods of Instruction </p><p>Lecture, class discussion, written homework assignments, listening assignments, student classroom presentations, daily quizzes, unit and final exams. </p><p>Evaluation </p><p>Evaluation Chapter Questions 20% Essay Questions 20% Exams 30% Research Paper 30% (8-10 pages, doubled spaced, 12 point New Times Roman, with 1 margins) </p><p>Assistance for Students with Disabilities </p><p>Students are expected to attend every class and are responsible for all material and assignments covered in class. Sufficient leniency is provided for absences due to illness and personal emergency, although students incurring excessive absences of this nature should contact the Registrars Office regarding course withdrawal. Attendance is an important factor in determining a students grade in the course (please refer to grading policies outlined below). Students are expected to make every effort to contact the instructor regarding an absence prior to the beginning of the class period missed. Note: Students exceeding eight absences will not pass and may be administratively dropped from the course. </p><p>Health and Safety </p><p>The health and safety of our students is of paramount concern. Specific health and safety issues confronting musicians are summarized at: http://www.music.iastate.edu/info/advising/healthandsafety.pdf From that publication: Hearing health is essential to your lifelong success as a musician. Noise induced hearing loss is largely preventable. You must avoid overexposure to loud sounds, especially for long periods of time. Musicians use their bodies in specific and highly trained ways, and injuries can occur that can have lasting impact on performance ability. Performers need to be aware of vocal and musculoskeletal health issues that affect them. Musicians at all levels of achievement can suffer from repetitive stress injuries, neuromuscular conditions or dystonias, and psychological issues including severe performance anxiety. Please feel free to discuss additional health and safety concerns for musicians with me. Although the Music History class does not impose the health and safety risks of other music courses, students should be aware of the potential hearing loss associated with extended exposure to audio playback via headphones and the repetitive strain injuries that can occur from repeated computer keyboarding. Additional information regarding repetitive strain injury may be found here: http://web.eecs.umich.edu/~cscott/rsi.html </p><p>Course Attendance </p><p>Students are expected to attend every class and are responsible for all material and assignments covered in class. Sufficient leniency is provided for absences due to </p><p>http://www.music.iastate.edu/info/advising/healthandsafety.pdfhttp://web.eecs.umich.edu/~cscott/rsi.html</p></li><li><p>MUS 4531: Music History I page 3 </p><p>Policy </p><p>illness and personal emergency, although students incurring excessive absences of this nature should contact the Registrars Office regarding course withdrawal. Attendance is an important factor in determining a students grade in the course (please refer to grading policies outlined below). Students are expected to make every effort to contact the instructor regarding an absence prior to the beginning of the class period missed. Attendance is a critical factor in determining a students grade in this course. Specifically, credit and penalties based on a students attendance are assessed as follows: </p><p> A 6% credit is awarded to every students exam average outlined above. </p><p> A 2% penalty is assessed for every absence the student incurs in the course. </p><p> Students who have more than four absences before October 15 will be asked to drop the class. </p><p> Students who have more than six absences total for the semester will fail the course. </p><p> The instructor reserves the right to waive the attendance penalty for extenuating circumstances. Students must communicate extenuating circumstances with the instructor at the earliest time possible. </p><p> Academic Integrity </p><p>Students are responsible for reading, understanding, and adhering to the colleges policies pertaining to academic integrity and plagiarism. Please refer to the CSU-Pueblo Student Handbook and College Catalog. The penalties for academic dishonesty are severe and ignorance is not an acceptable excuse. Academic dishonesty is any form of cheating which results in students giving or receiving unauthorized assistance in an academic exercise or receiving credit for work which is not their own. Any academic dishonesty is grounds for dismissal. Any student judged to have engaged in cheating may receive a failing grade for the work in question, a failing grade for the course, or any other penalty which the instructor finds appropriate. Academic dishonesty is a behavioral issue, not an issue of academic performance. As such, it is considered an act of misconduct and is also subject to the University disciplinary process as defined in the Student Code of Conduct. The following acts of misconduct are acts of academic dishonesty: </p><p>1) Cheating: intentional using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information, or study aids in any academic exercise. The term academic exercise includes all forms of work submitted for credit or hours. </p><p>2) Fabrication: intentional and unauthorized falsification or invention of any information or citation in an academic exercise. </p><p>3) Facilitating Academic Dishonesty: intentionally or knowingly helping or attempting to help another to violate a provision of the institutional code of academic integrity. </p><p>4) Plagiarism: the deliberate adoption or reproduction of ideas, words, or statements of another person as ones own without acknowledgement. </p><p>5) Unauthorized Collaboration: intentionally sharing information or working together in an academic exercise when such actions are not approved by the course instructor. </p><p> This is not meant to be an exhaustive list of all acts of academic dishonesty, but is a guide to help faculty and students understand what constitutes academic dishonesty. </p><p>Use of Personal Technology in the Classroom </p><p>The use of personal technology in the classroom (cell phones, tape recorders, laptop computers, cameras, etc.) is often distracting and counterproductive to classroom instruction. I reserve the right to limit the use of such technology in their classrooms </p></li><li><p>MUS 4531: Music History I page 4 </p><p> and establish grade penalties when the use of technology violates course policy. Even in courses where no explicit policy is outlined in the syllabus, students should, as a courtesy, request and receive permission to use personal technology in the classroom prior to doing so. </p><p>Incompletes </p><p>The instructor will grant a grade of incomplete in this course only in the most extenuating of circumstances. An incomplete will not be granted simply to extend time to complete work that should have been done in a timely manner. </p><p>Missed Exams </p><p>Students who, for the most extenuating circumstances, will be absent for an exam must arrange to take the exam prior to the exam date. No student will be permitted to take an exam after the scheduled exam time. Subsequent exam grades will substitute for the missed exam per the grading policy outlined below. No make-up will be given for a missed final exam without approval of the Dean. </p><p> Course Calendar </p><p>Please refer to the course calendar provided separately. </p><p>Grading Scale </p><p>For class assignments, letter grade equivalents are: A = 90 - 100% B = 80 - 89% C = 70 - 79% D = 60 - 69% F = 0 - 59% </p></li><li><p>MUS 4531: Music History I page 5 </p><p>Course Calendar Mon., Aug. 24 Class Orientation Wed., Aug. 26 Library visit Fri., Aug. 28 Ancient Greek Music Chapter 1 questions due Mon., Aug 31 Boethius, St. Benedict, introduction to plainchant Paragraph on paper topic </p><p>Wed., Sept. 2 The Mass Fri., Sept. 4 The Mass, concluded Chapter 2 questions due Mon., Sept. 7 Harmonization of chant: Musica enchiriadis Wed., Sept. 9 Further embellishment of chant: troping, Guido Fri., Sept. 11 Other developments in 11thC: golliards, melismatic organum Identify comparison Mon., Sept. 14 12thC: Hildegard, rhythmic modes (discant style, clausula) Chapter 3 questions due Wed., Sept. 16 12thC/13thC: secular motet Fri., Sept. 18 13thC: Franco of Cologne Biographical timeline Mon., Sept. 21 14thC: Philip di Vitry, ars nova Wed., Sept. 23 14thC: Guillaume Machaut isorhythmic motet, formes fixes Chapter 4 questions due Fri., Sept. 25 14thC: ars subtilior Mon., Sept. 28 14thC/15thC: Dunstable, the English countenance Biographical section Wed., Sept. 30 review for Exam I Fri., Oct. 2 Exam I Mon., Oct. 5 15thC: DuFay Chapter 5 questions due Wed., Oct. 7 late 15thC composers Initial comparison outline Fri., Oct. 9 early 16th century: Josqin, mass, secular song Chapter 6 questions due Mon., Oct. 12 The Reformation and Counterreformation Wed., Oct. 14 Music of the late 16th century: madrigal Chapter 7 questions due Fri., Oct. 16 Florentine Camerata and the invention of opera Thesis paragraph Mon., Oct. 19 discuss research papers Chapter 8 questions due </p><p>Wed., Oct. 21 Music in the early 17th century Fri., Oct. 23 review for Exam II Mon., Oct. 26 Exam II Paper Outline Wed., Oct. 28 Arcangelo Corelli Chapter 9 questions due </p><p>Fri., Oct. 30 Music in the late 17th century Mon., Nov. 2 1700s Chapter 10 questions due Wed., Nov. 4 1710s Paper Draft 1 Fri., Nov. 6 1720s Chapter 11 questions due </p><p>Mon., Nov. 9 1730s Wed., Nov. 11 1740s Chapter 12 questions due Fri., Nov. 13 discuss research papers Mon., Nov. 16 discuss research papers Chapter 13 questions due Wed., Nov. 18 review for Exam III Paper Final Draft Fri., Nov. 20 Exam III </p><p>Mon., Nov. 23 THANKSGIVING Wed., Nov. 25 THANKSGIVING Fri., Nov. 27 THANKSGIVING Mon., Nov. 30 Research Paper presentations Wed., Dec. 2 Research Paper presentations Fri., Dec. 4 Research Paper presentations </p><p> Textbook link: http://linusbooks.com/?wpsc-product=the-art-of-organized-sound-david-p-volk </p>http://linusbooks.com/?wpsc-product=the-art-of-organized-sound-david-p-volk</li></ul>