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Cambridge Tutors College Magazine

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    (FRONT COVER) CTC Student MagazineCTC Student MagazineCTC Student Magazine SSSUMMERUMMERUMMER 201220122012

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    CONTENTS

    PRINCIPALS FOREWORD 3

    GO APE! 4

    WORLD BOOK DAY 5

    INTERVIEW WITH JUSTIN KON 6

    NATURES PREDATOR 7

    I TOOK AN ARROW TO THE KNEE 8

    A LABOUR OF LOVE: TEACHING 10

    CAMBRIDGE INTERVIEW EXPERIENCE 11, 17

    THE DUKE OF EDINBURGH AWARD 12

    CLUBS AND ACTIVITIES 14

    A VISIT TO THE LONDON EYE 16

    TALK WITH THAIS 18

    FOOTBALL FUNDRAISING 21

    MUSIC, INC: MAKING NOISE WITH A DIFFERENCE 22

    INFORMAL CONCERT 24

    HOBBIES AND TALENTS; TRADITIONAL DANCING FROM AROUND THE WORLD 25

    LEAVERS PHOTOS 26

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    I t is hard to believe that we are moving towards the end of

    another academic year at CTC. It only seems like yesterday

    (and certainly not last summer!) that I wrote an article for

    the College Magazine in which I paid tribute to CTCs founder

    Principal, Roger Osborne, and to his dream of creating this great

    place of learning of ours. If anything, the past year has again

    demonstrated just how committed and determined we are at

    CTC are to the continued pursuit of academic excellence. I was

    reminded of this in March when I attended the annual awards

    ceremony at the House of Lords for students who sat A level and

    GCSE examinations at colleges belonging to CIFE (the Council for

    Independent Education) in 2011. Around 20 independent schools

    and colleges belong to CIFE so if I tell you that a quarter of the

    academic prizes awarded that day went to CTC students you will

    appreciate how proud and privileged I felt to be present. Such awards serve as a reminder not only

    of the dedication and efforts of our students and staff, but also of just how much can be achieved

    through the pursuit of ones academic goals and ambitions. With this in mind, I wish all CTC

    students a very successful examination period and look forward to celebrating your achievements

    with you later this summer. As for this latest edition of the College Magazine, I would like to

    congratulate everybody involved in it and to thank them for emphasising that for all our focus on

    studying and sitting examinations we also enjoy being part of a close-knit, friendly and

    international community. I have been fortunate this year to visit, on behalf of the College,

    countries as diverse as China, Latvia, Cambodia, Estonia and Vietnam and in each of them I was

    made aware of the high regard in which CTC is held by parents, students and alumni and,

    specifically, of how great that sense of community and integration is valued. It is a very special

    feature of daily life at the College and one which we must always work hard to maintain.

    Well done to the Magazine team and best wishes to all for the summer!

    Mario Di Clemente

    Principal

    PRINCIPALS FOREWORD

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    T hey say that the best way to overcome

    your fear is to face it. Strangely enough it

    is true

    The decision to join the activity was more than

    spontaneous. I did not even bother to find out

    what it really was, that activity with such a fancy

    name. I was simply attracted by a colourful poster

    stuck on the B52 door and encouraged by an

    enthusiastic invitation from Mr. Torres. Thats it.

    Only God knew what kind of adventure was

    actually waiting for us.

    There were 12 of us which is quite impressive for

    a 10 a.m. Saturday morning event. Luckily, the

    destination was quite far away, so we managed to

    sleep an extra 2 hours with the quiet music of the

    morning radio. The college van stopped at a

    remote location and everything started from then

    on.

    Thick ropes, safety belts, a pretty instructor

    explaining how to work with equipment, Mr.

    Torres walking around and taking photos, terrible

    screams far away - that was my very first

    impression of the place. I was not particularly

    scared until we had to have a go.

    I promise that I have never experienced anything

    like that before. I cannot estimate the actual

    height at which we had to overcome the

    obstacles, but people down there seemed to be

    no bigger than ants. My heart was beating so fast

    that sometimes I thought I could not control my

    movements. I must admit that I have a sort of

    height phobia, but the most terrible thing is that

    there was no way to go back: you must either

    keep going or - keep going. We had to pass over

    the long suspension bridges made from wooden

    boards situated at a certain distance from each

    other. And the golden rule was, Always stay

    attached if you dont want to fall down and end

    your lifes journey in such a pathetic way.

    The most frightening moment, I remember, was

    when we had to jump and slide towards a huge

    By Quynh Chi Le (Kate)

    GO APE!

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    net. That was a split second when I started to

    think of my family, my friends and thats when 18

    years of my life just flashed in front of my eyes so

    quickly - as if everything which had happened to

    me before became no longer important, apart

    from the dearest people whom I love. It was

    freakingly scary yet breathtaking, unbelievably

    dizzy, yet unforgettable. I cannot find better

    words to describe my feelings. I felt proud. Proud

    that I could surprise myself, face the fear and

    win!

    In summary, every article conveys a message to

    readers and this one is not an exception. The

    moral is: opportunity knocks only once, so when

    you are young grab every single available

    opportunity to try and discover something new.

    Listen to Mr. Torres. He knows what hes doing!

    World Book Day

    World Book Day originated in Catalonia. People would

    give gifts of books and roses to each other. This

    tradition began 80 years ago. The day is now

    observed in approximately 30 countries across the

    world, although interestingly not on the same day in

    every country.

    To celebrate this event a book bring and buy sale was

    held in the library on March 1st.

    Students and staff kindly donated books which were

    then sold to eager customers.

    The book sale along with a quiz made a grand total

    of 92.10p. These proceeds were sent to Book Aid

    International. The organisation uses the money to

    distribute books in developing countries. This is

    done to help promote literacy by creating reading

    and learning opportunities for disadvantaged

    children, in order to help them realise their potential

    and eradicate poverty.

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    By Sara Akhavan

    INTERVIEW WITH JUSTIN KON

    When were you at CTC?

    I came to CTC in the cold, wintry month of

    December 1975 to do my A Level course which I

    successfully completed in June 1976. I left

    Croydon to pursue my tertiary education at the

    University of Essex in September 1976.

    Where and what is your occupation now?

    I am a Managing Director of a Logistics Company

    in Petaling Jaya, Malaysia.

    How did it feel being one of the earlier batches

    of Malaysian students in CTC?

    I was the second batch of Malaysian students to

    study in CTC. There were less than 10 Malaysian

    students studying at CTC during my time. As we

    were far away from home, we became a closely-

    knit group. Later, we began to make new friends

    with the English students and many other students

    from Luxembourg, Japan, Nigeria, Thailand, Hong

    Kong, Iran, Pakistan and Indonesia. This gave us a

    very good exposure as CTC is like a mini United

    Nations with students coming from all over the

    world.

    How was Croydon in the 1970s and what are

    the biggest changes you think it has made?

    I remember Croydon was a very beautiful town

    with many green parks, wonderful shops at the

    Whitgift Centre and restaurants in the mid 1970s.

    Today, the population is probably much more

    cosmopolitan with many more departmental

    stores, shops, a wide choice of restaurants, office

    towers and luxury apartments. I also noticed CTC

    has grown by leaps and bounds with new premises

    being added to the original building, a well-

    stocked library, up-to-date computer facilities,

    cyber caf, increased student numbers and a very

    international student body.

    In September 2011, I was travelling from London

    to Brighton by train which had a brief stopover at

    East Croydon Station - I found the First Capital

    Connect train to be very clean and comfortable

    compared to British Rail in the 1970s. The skyline

    in Croydon has definitely been transformed for

    the better. As Croydon is just south of London, I

    learnt that many foreign companies are locating

    their offices there too.

    What was the first thing you thought to

    yourself, when you arrived in Croydon?

    Culture shock came to my mind as everything

    looked so different from home. The weather was

    very cold which was a complete contrast to our

    warm, tropical climate of a perpetual summer.

    The food was bland but I told myself that I had to

    adapt my taste buds and learn to appreciate

    British food, otherwise, I would go hungry.

    How did you cope with the