colourful language

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Slideshow presented to the AIC Language & Colour Study Group at the AIC 2013 Congress in

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  • 1. Colourful Language AIC CONGRESS 2013 LANGUAGE AND COLOUR STUDY GROUP Eleanor Maclure July 2013
  • 2. MA Graphic Design Major Project Colourful Language
  • 3. Introduction
  • 4. COLOURFUL LANGUAGE AIC 2013Language and Colour Study Group The philosopher Wittgenstein famously asked How do I know that this color is red?It would be an answer to say: I have learnt English. (Batchelor, 2000 pp.91)
  • 5. COLOURFUL LANGUAGE AIC 2013Language and Colour Study Group Colourful language is a visual research project that uses design methodologies to explore different aspects of the relationship between colour and language. Introduction
  • 6. COLOURFUL LANGUAGE AIC 2013Language and Colour Study Group Introduction
  • 7. Proposal Outline
  • 8. COLOURFUL LANGUAGE AIC 2013Language and Colour Study Group Research Question How We Talk about Colour Exploring the way we use language to describe and define colours.
  • 9. COLOURFUL LANGUAGE AIC 2013Language and Colour Study Group Research Question 1.The Names of Colours: Analysis of the body of words used to describe colour, how they can be categorised, their origins, their meanings. 2.The Names of Colours: how do they visually relate to each other. For example how does red relate to pink, maroon or terracotta? How do these colour terms relate to each other in turn? 3.The Names of Colours: The consistency of their application, interpretation, definition and understanding. For example, the variation in how colour terms can be used to label colours and how varying colours can be identified using the same term.
  • 10. Research Methodology
  • 11. COLOURFUL LANGUAGE AIC 2013Language and Colour Study Group Research Methodology A range of methodologies were used to address different aspects of the research question. These developed into sub-projects which were used to explore both the subject and the effectiveness of the process.
  • 12. COLOURFUL LANGUAGE AIC 2013Language and Colour Study Group Research Methodology Research methods included: Interviews Digital image manipulation Typologising collected material Information graphics Analysing existing bodies of text Generative systems Photography Survey
  • 13. Outputs
  • 14. COLOURFUL LANGUAGE AIC 2013Language and Colour Study Group Outputs Each sub-project became a book, with its own internal visual identity. The projects were united using a consistent cover design, creating a series.
  • 15. COLOURFUL LANGUAGE AIC 2013Language and Colour Study Group Outputs
  • 16. COLOURFUL LANGUAGE AIC 2013Language and Colour Study Group RED REDSEARCH RESULTS SEARCH RESULTS RED REDPIXELATED PIXELATED REDRED BLURREDBLURRED RED REDCOLOUR AVERAGED COLOUR AVERAGED Outputs
  • 17. COLOURFUL LANGUAGE AIC 2013Language and Colour Study Group Outputs
  • 18. COLOURFUL LANGUAGE AIC 2013Language and Colour Study Group Outputs
  • 19. COLOURFUL LANGUAGE AIC 2013Language and Colour Study Group Outputs
  • 20. COLOURFUL LANGUAGE AIC 2013Language and Colour Study Group Outputs Light Sources Type of Light Source Quantity of Light NATURAL DAYLIGHT FLUORESCENT BULBS INCANDESCENT BULBS OTHER DONT KNOW BRIGHT MEDIUM DIM Viewing Conditions The way we see colour is largely dependent on the quality of light that we view it in. The brightness and temperature of different light sources can vary widely, colours viewed in natural daylight will often look different under energy saving or compact fluorescent lights, for example. This phenomenon is known as metamerism. In order to allow for this discrepancy I asked participants some multiple-choice questions about the lighting conditions they viewed the survey in. Just over half of respondents viewed the survey in artificial light, with an almost equal number split between fluorescent and incandescent sources. The remaining participants viewed the survey in natural daylight, with just under two thirds reporting the light as having medium brightness. 19% of participants said that they had taken the survey in dim light, while 17% said described their light source as bright. This variation is but one of the factors that could have affected how respondents perceived the colour samples in the final sections of the survey. Although it was impossible to control these variables in the process of conducting the survey, it is a greater reflection of how we experience colour in everyday life, where there is potentially even greater variability in the sources and quality of the light that surrounds us. In addition to the quantity and sources of light, participants were also asked what type of computer and screen they viewed the survey on. This was to take into account the fact that different types of screens have slightly different colour gamuts, affecting the way colours are rendered. It would have been possible to extend this line of questioning to ask participants about the brightness and colour calibration of their monitors, however for the purposes of this project that level of detail seemed unnecessary. Sources and quantity of ambient light, type of computer and screen can all affect how we perceive colours in the digital realm. Participants were all asked a series of straightforward questions about how they viewed the survey in order to allow for these factors. 45 respondents did not have English as a first language. 26Different languages were represented in the survey. Is English your first language?What is your Nationality? Language Top 10 Languages Represented 1. Portuguese 2. French 3. German 4 Greek 5. Spanish 6. Welsh 7. Arabic 8. Chinese/Cantonese 9. Japanese 10. Polish YES NO 65% of respondents identified themselves as British or English. 36 Different nationalities took part in the survey. Nationality Top 10 Nationalities Represented 1. British/English 2. American 3. French 4 Portuguese 5. Australian 6. Brazilian 7. Scottish 8. German 9. Greek 10. Japanese ENGLISH/BRITISH OTHER AMERICAN
  • 21. COLOURFUL LANGUAGE AIC 2013Language and Colour Study Group Comments It was obviously not black. It just wasnt. Blacks not hard to identify. It wasnt black. There were several people in that argument, split about half for green and half for brown. I had a similar discussion about that same colour a few years later with someone else. We then discovered my friend was colour blind Perception is in the eye of the beholder... Sometimes it is difficult to know when one colour ends and another begins - at what point does red become orange? etc Blue/green colours often lead to disagreement between people. There was a large group of us over 10, perhaps 20 in this argument at one point. Both names refer to the same hex code in the html specification. Colour Disagreements The types of objects disagreed about: Was the disagreement resolved in any way? YES NO AGREED TO DISAGREE MEASURED IT/LOOKED IT UP CLOTHING COLOUR PAINT COLOUR CAR COLOUR SOFT FURNISHINGS BOUNDARIES BETWEEN COLOURS OTHER Outputs Pinky purple, Baby pink, Pink, Fuchsia, Fuchsia pink, Magenta, Raspberry, Coral, Crimson red, Blood red, Venetian red