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St. Charles County Community News Community News, OFallon, St. Charles, St. Peters, Cottleville, Weldon Spring, Lake Saint Louis, Wentzville, Lincoln County, Family, Events, Chamber of Commerce, Book Buzz, Crossword Puzzle, SUDOKU, Recipe

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  • July 13, 2011 Vol 13 No 28July 23, 2014

    Missouri State Fair to put the focus on kids

    Missouri State Fair

    By Shawn Clubb

    The Missouri State Fair will once again focus on things that grow this year. The difference is that this years fair will focus on kids.

    The 112th Missouri State Fair will run Aug. 7-17 in Sedalia. The State Fairs theme is Harvest the Fun. It will feature all of the competitions, exhibits and festi-val fun that families have come to expect.

    But beyond those time-held staples, the fair will put kidsand kids involvement in agriculturein the spotlight.

    Were doing some specific things for kids this year, Missouri State Fair Market-ing Director Tammie Nichols said. The opening day ceremony will be in front of our family fun center, which is full of en-gagement activities for children. Before it starts, there will be a stage show by a group called Those Funny Little People.

    Opening day will also offer a treat for 130 youths from Boys and Girls Clubs in Kansas City and Sedalia. They will be at the opening day ceremony and then they will experience a fun day at the fair. Part-ners have come together to provide them with a meal, t-shirts and activities, Nich-ols said.

    Aug. 16 will be Celebrate Kids in Agri-culture Day. According to State Fair or-ganizers, the day will be coordinated by the Missouri State Fair and the Missouri Department of Agriculture, and it will

    be sponsored by Missouri Department of Conservation. They said the day will acknowledge youth currently involved in Missouris agriculture industry, and help raise awareness of and encourage an interest in agriculture among Missouri youth.

    Celebrate Kids in Agriculture Day will include free gate admission for children ages 12 years of age and younger; free old-fashioned harvest games including gunny sack races, egg relay races and wa-ter relays; and the Largest Homegrown Tomato Contest and the Fun on the Farm Poster Contest.

    Fostering youth development is the premise of our agriculture showcase, Missouri State Fair Director Mark Wolfe said. The new day, Celebrate Kids in Agriculture, will offer several unique ex-periences especially for youth and their families.

    There will be plenty for kids to do at the fair on every day, Nichols said.

    We are definitely family-friendly, she said. We have tons of professional en-tertainment that kids are going to really enjoy.

    There will even be a comedy pirate show in the Kids Zone. Nichols said the show is entertaining for anybody, any age.

    There are many other ways that the State Fair will be appealing to everyone, she said.

    There will be many free demonstra-tions and concerts.

    However, tickets must be purchased for the headlining acts that will take to the Pepsi Grandstand. Among those are Scotty McCreery and Kelsey K on Aug. 7, Joan Jett and the Blackhearts and Black Stone Cherry on Aug. 8, Sara Evans and Joe Nichols on Aug. 9, Beatlemania Live on Aug. 12, Florida Georgia Line Heres To The Good Times Tour 2014 and Colt Ford on Aug. 13, MercyMe on Aug. 14, Jake Owens Days of Gold Tour starring

    Photo courtesy Missouri State Fair

    See FAIR on page 2

    RecipesSample the Taste of Summer

    11

    Around TownGirl Scouts Shine

    4

    BusinessAdvertiser Spotlight

    7

    SchoolBack to School Fair

    8

    FREE Online Subscription at mycnews.comMovie

    Dawn of the Planet of the Apes Photos courtesy of 20th Century Fox

    9

  • July 23, 2014 Community News - St. Charles County www.mycnews.com2

    In This Issue...

    8

    7

    2

    9

    10

    11

    14

    16

    Vol. 16 No. 30

    Around Town

    Like us on Facebook: facebook.com/mycnews

    mycnewsFREE Online Subscription

    www.

    Around TownLocal news and events like Food Truck Frolic at SCC, OFallons Eggs & Issues Breakfast July 25, and more.

    BusinessNew to the area business, Seniors Helping Seniors will provide extra income and continued independence for seniors.

    SchoolBack to School Fair returns to Wentzvilles Holt High School on Aug. 9.

    MovieLike its 20th Century predecessors, Dawn of the Planted of the Apes explores the dual themes of world conquest and living in harmony.

    Sports and Learn & PlayLocal sport authority Gary B will fill you in on the weekends sporting events. Also, play Sudoku, try your hand at and discover a new book with Novel Ideas.

    RecipesTart cherries are always the right pick.

    Whats HappeningThe only events calendar you need to stay entertained all week long.

    Classifieds

    Over the FenceJoe Morice is to Community News readers what Wilson was to Tim Taylor: enjoy a fresh perspective

    12

    Follow us onwww.pinterest.com/mycnews

    FAIR from Cover

    We have a federal govern-ment that chooses which laws they will abide by and which laws they will ignore. Yet we as citizens are expected to abide by every law and regulation even those that are in violation of our US Constitution. Federal agencies are ignoring our Con-stitution and targeting those who disagree with the current administration. Congress pass-es 200 to 300 new laws every year but federal agencies issue

    3,000 or more new regulations each year. HHS on the so-called affordable health care act alone has issued 11,000 pages of new regulations. We have a govern-ment that is simply out of con-trol and it is time we the people stood up and spoke out to take back our country.

    Our local county sheriff has the legal authority and consti-tutional responsibility to pro-tect the citizens against illegal and unconstitutional actions

    of the federal and state agen-cies. Approx 98 percent of the counties in the U.S. have sher-iffs elected by and accountable to the people. As of Jan. 1, 2015 we will have a Police Chief ap-pointed by and accountable to a small group of politicians. We the people can change that by signing the Sheriff Preserva-tion petition that will allow this issue to be placed on the Nov. ballot so the voters of St Charles County can decide.

    There will be a meeting Tues-day, July 29 at 7pm at St Peters City Hall on Mexico Road that will explain this issue in more detail and provide you the op-portunity to sign the petition to keep the office of sheriff ac-countable to the people. Peti-tions will also be available at area libraries on Saturday Au-gust 2.

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    Jake Owen and Eli Young Band with spe-cial guest The Cadillac Three on Aug. 15, and Halestorm and Sevendust on Aug. 16.

    State Fair Arena will host many events includ-ing the MRCA Finals Rodeo; Knights of Valour full-contact joust troupe; Motocross champion-ship round of the MO Fair Cross Series, featur-ing quads and motorcycles; Flat Track TT Race featuring quads, motorcycles, lawnmowers and outlaw go-carts; the antique, classic and farm

    tractor pull; a garden and mini-rod pull; the Missouri Stock Antique tractor pull; the bull riding championships; and a demolition derby.

    Tickets to the Missouri State Fair Pepsi Grand-stand concerts, State Fair Arena events and Governors Ham Breakfast are on sale through Ticketmaster and the Missouri State Fair Box Office.

    For more information, visit mostatefair.com or call 1.800.422.FAIR

    Letter to the Editor:Protect Your Constitutional Rights Keep Your County Sheriff

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  • www.mycnews.com Community News - St. Charles County July 23, 2014 Around Town 3

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    The Food Truck Frolic and Outdoor Summer Movie Series will return to the St. Charles Commu-nity College on Friday, July 25 and will feature a showing of Frozen the sing-a-long.

    The fourth annual Mike Hansen Memorial Trivia Night Auction will take place at 6 pm Saturday, Aug. 2 at Immaculate Conception Parish Hall, 2089 Hanley Rd. in Dardenne Prai-rie.

    Tables are still available for event that will feature games, prizes, mulligans, 50/50 raffle, raffle auction, silent and live auctions, and also includes beer and soda. For $160 any-one can reserve a table for eight, or pay $20 per person and be assigned a table. Play-ers are free to bring their own beverages and snacks.

    The annual trivia night hon-ors paramedic Mike Hansen

    who passed away in the line of duty at the age of 38. The funds raised provide educa-tional resources and scholar-ships for students taking EMT and Paramedic classes in St. Charles County. During Han-sens 16 years at St. Charles County Ambulance District, he served as a paramedic, a training officer, a supervisor, and a member of the St. Louis Metro Strike Team. Hansen was also a volunteer firefighter, captain, with Lake St. Louis Fire Protection District for seven years. His legacy lives on through the students and this fundraiser.

    For more information, to

    reserve a table, or to make a donation, please contact Di-ane Hansen by email at han-sendi@me.com, or by phone at 636.236.9227

    The OFallon Chamber of Commerce will be hosting a free breakfast at 7 am on Friday, July 25 at Garden Villas of OFallon, 7092 S Outer 364, where the business community can hear from their State Senator & State Representatives on important issues and challenges brought to the State of Missouri.

    Legislators confirmed include Represen-tative Robert Cornejo, Representative Kurt

    Bahr, and Representative Chuck Gatschen-berger.

    Doors for the Eggs and Issue Breakfast will open at 7 am, and the program will begin at 7:30 am.

    Reservations are required and can be made by contacting the OFallon Chamber of Com-merce at 636.240.1818, Erin@OFallonCham-ber.org or online at www.OFallonChamber.org.

    Food Truck Frolic to Return to SCC July 23

    St. Charles County Paramedic Association Community Outreach to Host 4th Annual Trivia Night Auction

    Chamber to Host Eggs & Issues Breakfast

    Mike Hansen. Photo courtesy St. Charles County Paramedic Association Community Outreach

  • July 23, 2014 Community News - St. Charles County www.mycnews.com4 Around Town

    Adolph and Joyce Mueller have faithfully co-ordinated the annual Dardenne Operation Christmas Child program for ten of the past twelve years. Under their leadership, Operation Christmas Child has challenged the members and friends of Dardenne Presbyterian Church, organized Dardenne as a collection point, and, most importantly, blessed thousands of children around the world each Christmas.

    Since 1993, more than 100 million boys and girls in over 130 countries have experienced Gods love through the power of simple shoe-

    box gifts from Operation Christmas Child. The Christian organization Samaritans Purse works with local churches to deliver the gifts and share the life-changing Good News of Jesus Christ to the children.

    Over the past ten years, Dardenne Presbyte-rian Church has donated 3,732 boxes, and been a drop-off center for area churches and schools that have collected over 40,000 boxes. In the Midwest region of the United States, the closest area contributing more than the Dardenne Prai-rie/St. Charles County area is Dallas, Texas.

    Girl Scout Cadettes Myah Eggert and Danielle Foster of Troop 2359 never thought hu-morous intentions could take such a serious turn.

    The pair recognized a wom-an at their neighborhood pool recently and went to tell her a joke. Once they reached her, they saw something amiss.

    When we got out of the pool, I noticed she wasnt acting right and she was hanging on to the side of the chair and rocking around, Myah said. When I tried talking to her she was non-verbal. Thats when Dani-elle and I had to take action.

    The woman, Karen LeMere, has diabetes and while at the Laurel Park Pool in St. Peters, she became hypoglycemic, meaning her blood sugar had become dangerously low.

    Even though I was nervous I knew I had to try to help, Myah said. Danielle stood behind her to flag my mom out of the pool while I tried to talk to the lady. When I saw her glucose meter out, I thought it might be for her diabetes. So when my mom got out of the pool, Danielle and I ran up and got a soda while my mom stayed with the lady.

    Once they realized some-thing wasnt right with me, they took charge, Karen, a former Girl Scout herself, said. They went and got me a soda from the concession stand to raise my blood sugar then they stayed with me for 45 minutes making sure I was okay. I am very proud

    of those young women.Myah said soon after Karen

    started drinking the soda she started coming back to normal and was able to talk to them and tell them what happened.

    A few years ago, Troop Leader Kim Eggert and her girls took a first-aid class sponsored by the American Red Cross. The woman who taught the class ex-plained situations Kim and the girls may encounter, what signs to look for in each case and the best way to help.

    Remembering the knowledge they gained from the class, Eg-gert told the girls their quick-thinking actions kept Karen from slipping into a diabetic coma. After Karen told the girls she was fine, Kim reminded

    them about the differences be-tween hypoglycemia and other conditions they learned in the first-aid class, such as strokes or coronaries and under what circumstances the girls might need to give cardiopulmonary resuscitation, CPR.

    Myah said after Karen was safe, the reality of what she and Dani-elle did set in. I freaked out be-cause I realized just how scary it was. Thats when Danielle and I started talking to my mom about the first-aid class we took a few years ago and my mom told us if we ever see a person behav-ing like that, think diabetes first because thats the easiest to fix. After a minute or so if the sugar doesnt work, call 911 because its probably a bigger problem.

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    Fun at the Pool Becomes Life-saving Effortfor two Local Girl Scouts

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    Girl Scout Cadettes Myah Eggert, left, and Danielle Foster.Photo courtesy Girl Scouts of Eastern Missouri

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  • 5www.mycnews.com Community News - St. Charles County July 23, 2014

  • After a long week, it is time to relax, feel the gentle breeze from the water at the marina and enjoy a free concert per-formed by Wade Trent. The music will begin at approxi-

    mately 6:30 pm on Friday, July 25. Be sure to bring some lawn chairs or a blanket because available tables and benches are limited.

    The Gator Island Grill will

    open at 6 pm with food and drink specials. View the menu at www.stpetersmo.net. Con-cert goers can also bring their own cooler and food; but no glass containers are allowed.

    There are still several more Sunset Fridays concerts now through Sept. 12. For more information about the Sunset Fridays concert schedule, visit stpetersmo.net and choose Events from the Things to Do drop-down menu.

    St. Peters 370 Lakeside Park is located at 1000 Lakeside Park Drive just off Hwy 370 in St. Peters. From Highway 370, use Exit 2 to reach 370 Lake-side Park Dr. Turn north to park entrance.

    Artists and musicians are invited to par-ticipate in the RSC Art & Family Festival in OFallon. The event will be held from 10 am 2 pm Saturday, Sept. 27, at the Renaud Spirit Center (RSC), 2650 Tri Sports Circle. In ad-dition to showcasing the work of some of the areas best artists, upscale crafters and musi-cians, free activities will be available for kids, including pumpkin painting. Food trucks will provide gourmet fare for sale, and all are in-vited to dress for exercise and take advantage of free admission to the RSC (7 am 7 pm) to try out recreational facilities, including an in-door track, exercise machines, a weight room

    and an indoor aquatic complex. Annual RSC memberships will be available during the event at a 10 percent discount.

    Artists and artisans can apply for booth space and demonstrate their art as well as sell their paintings, photography, pottery, glass de-signs, textile and fabric art, jewelry, sculpture, paper arts, altered books, woodenware and other artwork. The 10 x 10 space for artists in-cludes a tent canopy, table and chairs. The cost per booth is $10 and the deadline to apply for space is July 31. For an application or more in-formation, please contact Darren at dgranaas@ofallon.mo.us, or call 636.474.8150.

    For a fun-filled night with great perks, order tickets to OFallon Parks & Recreation Night at T.R. Hughes Ballpark on Sunday, July 27. The gates will open at 4:05 pm, with OFallons own River City Rascals batting against the Normal CornBelters at 5:05 pm. The ballpark is locat-ed at 900 T.R. Hughes Boulevard in OFallon.

    Besides admission to the game, the discounted ticket price of $10 (in advance) includes pre-game and game-time activities, a food voucher for a hot dog, chips and a drink, and a box seat located along

    the third base line behind the vis-itors dugout. Admission is free for children ages two and under. Festivities include the pre-game parade, vendor booths, kids games, face painting and more. Patrons also could win a chance to throw out the first pitch or participate in on-field games be-tween innings.

    Reserve your Parks & Rec Night tickets today by calling 636.240.2287, and pick them up

    at the Rascals box office. For more information about the ballpark or the River City Rascals, visit www.rivercityrascals.com.

    July 23, 2014 Community News - St. Charles County www.mycnews.com6 Around Town

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    pinterest.com/mycnewsTwo St. Louis Area Couples Help to ProvideSeniors Extra Income and Independence

    Candace Jennings Hired as Regional President -Hospital Operations for SSM Health Care St. Louis

    Two local couples have launched nonmedical home care-giving services matching seniors seeking employment with seniors who need help to continue liv-ing independently in their own homes.

    Mary and Michael Kierath have opened a Seniors Helping Seniors franchise to serve resi-dents in St. Louis County. Dan and JoAnn Goff have opened a Seniors Helping Seniors franchise to serve residents in St. Charles County.

    Seniors Helping Seniors in-home services, headquartered in Wyomissing, Pa., has opened more than 250 franchises in 42 states since 1998 following a unique, peer-to-peer business model that provides seniors with a way to give and to receive by hiring seniors to provide non-medical services to other seniors.

    The demand for this service is rapidly growing as our popu-lation continues to age, Seniors Helping Seniors co-founder Ki-ran Yocom said. We accepted Mary and Michael and Dan and JoAnn into our family of fran-chise owners because they truly understand the needs of this populationnot only on a pro-fessional level, but also on a per-sonal level.

    The couples stressed that the Seniors Helping Seniors business model is different than other companies because the older caregivers and receivers can re-late to each other based on simi-lar life experiences. They added that there is a shortage of em-ployment for seniors in the area, and this will provide an oppor-tunity for seniors to serve each other and get paid to do so.

    Nonmedical services provided may include, but are not limited to, cooking, light housekeeping, yard work, pet walking, shopping, transportation, home mainte-nance, small repairs, grooming, companionship, overnight visits, post-operative assistance and re-spite care.

    For information about ser-vices or employment call 636.294.3012 for St. Louis Coun-ty or 636.333.9788 for St. Charles County.

    About Seniors Helping Se-niors in-home services: Kiran and Philip Yocom started Seniors Helping Seniors in-home services in Berks County, Pa., initially as a nonprofit organization to provide a much-needed and appreciated service in their community. The Seniors Helping Seniors organi-zation was incorporated in 1998 as a way to spread the philosophy across the country through fran-chises. Prior to launching Seniors Helping Seniors in-home services, Kiran Yocom served with Mother Teresa in India for 14 years.

    After an extensive nationwide search, SSM Health Care has hired Candace Jennings, FACHE, as the new regional president - hospital operations, for SSM Health Care St. Louis. In this role, Jennings will have responsibility for seven hospitals in the St. Louis area in-cluding: Cardinal Glennon Chil-drens Medical Center, DePaul Health Center, St. Clare Health Center, St. Joseph Health Center, St. Joseph Health Center Wentz-ville, St. Joseph Hospital West and St. Marys Health Center, along with St. Joseph Medical Park.

    Candace exemplifies the type of leadership we have at SSM Health Care, and demonstrates the commitment and passion to our organizations mission of re-vealing the healing presence of God through exceptional health care services, said Chris Howard, president - hospital operations, SSM Health Care.

    Before joining SSM Health Care, Jennings served as se-nior vice president for Tennes-see Operations, a division of the Mountain States Health Alliance (MSHA). In this role she served as the market leader for the Ten-nessee division which included five acute care and three specialty hospitals. During her tenure, she successfully led several major ini-tiatives that enhanced the high-

    quality care and service Mountain States Health Alliance provides in Tennessee, including process improvements, quality improve-ment, physician alignment, ser-vice excellence, facility upgrades and financial success in a chal-lenging environment.

    During her seven years with MSHA, Jennings also held the po-sitions of vice president and COO, Washington County operations and senior vice president and CEO, Washington County operations.

    Jennings, a registered nurse, joined Mountain States in 2007 as the chief operating officer for St. Johns Hospital, Springfield, Ill. She also served as senior practice partner at Wheless and Associ-ates, a retained executive search firm in Birmingham, Ala., and as senior vice president and hospital administrator at Northeast Bap-tist Hospital, San Antonio. She also spent five years as a consul-tant to health care organizations with Ernst & Young.

    Jennings holds a masters degree in health services administration and a master of science in nursing from the University of Alabama in Birmingham. She is a Fellow in the American College of Health-care Executives, is certified as an Advanced Nurse Executive by the ANCC and serves on several com-munity boards in Johnson City,

    Tenn., and is currently on the Ten-nessee Hospital Association board.

    Jennings begins her new role with SSM Health Care on August 18.

    Dan Goff (left) of Seniors Helping Seniors will serve St. Charles County with his wife JoAnn, while Mary Kierath (right) of Seniors Helping Seniors will serve St. Louis County with her husband Michael. Photo by Ray Rockwell

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    SCC Young Peoples Theatre to Hold Open Auditions for Sleepy Hollow

    SCC Freezes Tuition for 2014-15

    Wentzville School DistrictBack to School Fair August 9 at Holt High

    St. Charles Community Colleges Young Peoples Theatre will hold open auditions for the production of Sleepy Hollow: A Musical Tale Saturday, Aug. 16.

    Auditions are open for all students ages 8-18 and will be held at 8:30 am in the theater of the Donald D. Shook Fine Arts Building on the SCC campus in Cottleville. A parent or guardian must be present with their child during the audition process.

    All auditions will consist of a song that will be taught, a short dance combination and brief read-ings from the script. Students should wear comfort-able clothes and shoes (no flip-flops). Any student cast must either have completed the Introductory Theater Workshop I class or enroll in that class in

    addition to being in the production. Sleepy Hollow: A Musical Tale will be performed

    in the theater of the Fine Arts Building at 7 pm Friday-Saturday, Oct. 17-18, and 2 pm Saturday-Sunday, Oct. 18-19.

    The musical is set on Halloween night, when modern-day kids decide to trick or treat at the old Crane House and are magically transported right into the middle of the classic tale of Ichabod Crane, Brom Bones, Katie Van Tassel and the Headless Horseman. Spooky and hilarious moments ensue as the kids cope with life in 1790 and how to find their way back home.

    For more information about auditions or the play, call 636.922.8233 or visit www.stchas.edu/YPT.

    Good news for area residents thinking about attending St. Charles Community College (SCC) for the first time (and for current and returning SCC stu-dents as well): College officials have announced that tuition rates have been frozen for the 2014-15 academic year.

    SCC offers educational op-portunities for first-time college students, transfer students, re-turning learners and high school juniors and seniors who want to

    dual-enroll. With tuition frozen, the cost to attend SCC is a great deal that just got better, said Chris Breitmeyer, vice president for academic and student affairs. SCC faculty and staff continue to work hard to ensure our stu-dents have a high-quality, af-fordable educational option, and keeping tuition flat demonstrates that dedication.

    In addition to quality aca-demic programs, SCC provides support and resources to encour-

    age student success that include financial assistance, scholarship options, a free on-campus tutor-ing center, veterans resources, accessibility services, a child de-velopment center and a number of clubs, activities, sports and events.

    To register for the fall semester, visit www.stchas.edu/Discover-SCC or call 636.922.8000. SCCs classes are $95 per credit hour for in-district students and $143 for out-of-district, in-state students.

    The Wentzville School District will host the fourth annual Back to School Fair for Wentzville School Dis-trict families on Saturday, Aug. 9 from 8 am 12 pm at Holt High School. The event is free for District fam-ilies and will feature dozens of vendors, free school supplies, games and fun activities for children.

    Last years event drew over 3,300 people, and thousands of dollars worth of school supplies were given away to District students. The Back to School Fair is designed to bring together local businesses, community groups and our District families in one place to share valuable information, discounts and free school supplies in a fun and festive atmosphere, said Director of Community Relations, Matt Deich-mann. Its beneficial to our students, their families and our community, and its a tremendous way to kick off the new school year.

    As part of the Fair the Kiwanis Club of West St. Charles County will sponsor a free pancake break-fast. Missouri Child Identification Program (Mo-CHIP) representatives will provide free child ID kits that include a disk with the childs information, photograph, fingerprints and vital information

    necessary for authorities in the event of abduction. Parents are encouraged to fill out the MoCHIP pa-perwork prior to the fair to save time, which can be found at: www. wentzville.k12.mo.us.

    The event is free, but families are encouraged to bring a non-perishable food item to donate at the door to Operation Food Search. If you are a business or community group interested in participating in the fair, you can find more information and register by visiting the District website at www.wentzville.k12.mo.us and clicking on the Back to School Fair logo on the left side of the homepage.

    Photo courtesy Wentzville School District

    www.mycnews.com

  • www.mycnews.com Community News - St. Charles County July 23, 2014 9Movie

    Dawn of the Planet of the Apes Photos courtesy of 20th Century Fox

    By Steve Bryan - Rated: PG-13Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

    The 2011 Planet of the Apes re-boot came as a welcome surprise to science fiction fans. Combin-ing an intelligent script with the talented Andy Serkis, Rise of the Planet of the Apes showed how good scientific intentions led to the near-extinction of mankind.

    Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, the latest installment, picks up the story 10 years later. Caesar, played once again by Serkis, leads an ape community that in-cludes his wife and son. Caesar and his comrades also believe humans to be extinct until a rou-tine hunting party encounters some survivors in the woods.

    Malcolm (Jason Clarke) pleads with Caesar to give him access to an abandoned hydroelectric plant. He hopes to use the equip-ment to generate power for the surviving humans living in the nearby city. Caesar and Malcolm form an unlikely alliance, but other humans and apes conspire against peaceful coexistence.

    Like its 20th Century prede-cessors, Dawn of the Planet of the Apes explores the dual themes of world conquest and living in harmony. Unlike the typical summertime blockbuster, this is a thought-provoking film that focuses more on the story and less on the special effects.

    One cannot say enough, though, about the human special effect that is known as Andy Ser-kis. Much has been written about his motion-capture performanc-es in The Lord of the Rings fran-chise and the upcoming Aveng-ers sequel. Fans and co-workers also lobbied to get him an Oscar nod, which just might happen after this performance.

    Combining technology with his own incredible talent, Andy Serkis personifies the wise leader of the apes. Even ham-pered by a motion capture suit, the actor gives a truly moving performance. Each gesture and expression comes through loud and clear. Audiences dont need to see Serkis to feel his talent.

    Toby Kebbell matches Ser-kis as Koba, a rabble-rouser amongst the ape population. Koba and Caesar share differ-ent beliefs, which threatens to tear the community apart. Caesar preaches that apes must not kill apes, but Koba will kill

    anyonehu-man or apeto further his own agenda.

    D i r e c t o r Matt Reeves hits all the right notes with this sequel. Balanc-ing the tech-nology with a talented cast yields a film thats delightfully dif-ferent than other offerings. From the looks of things, Reeves and Serkis already are on board for the third film, which means Cae-sars story isnt over yet.

    Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, rated PG-13 for intense sequenc-es of sci-fi violence and action and brief strong language, cur-

    rently is playing in theaters.Born and raised in South St.

    Louis, Steve Bryan is now based in Anaheim, California, and has been allowed access to movie and television sets to see actors and directors at work. Though his writing has taken him far from St. Louis, Steve is, at heart, still the same wide-eyed kid who spent countless hours watching classic movies at neighborhood theaters.

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  • July 23, 2014 Community News - St. Charles County www.mycnews.com10 SportsGary Baute

    www.kflandscapes.com

    www.fiueros.comwww.fiueroshotsauces.com

    Another River City Rascals Player Goes to the Big Leagues

    The team is respon-sible for getting third

    baseman Taylor Ard (pictured) back into a po-

    sition in the Major League Baseball system.

    After being with the team for less than a sea-son, Ard will be joining the Arizona Diamond-backs affiliate roster.

    Prior to signing a con-tract with the Rascals this past spring Ard was in the

    Seattle Mariners organization He never had an opportunity to start at his

    natural position in the hot corner but manager Steve Brook was able to work him in there.

    Impressive numbers for the 50 games he was in OFallon include: a .338 average, nine home runs, 33 runs batted in, nine out of 10 stolen bases and 17 walks.

    Ard becomes the fourth Rascal to be signed by a Major League Organization this season.

    * A great event

    Rascals Hit Slight Bump Starting Second Half of Season

    The weekend after the All-Star game, which the West won 2-0, the Rascals were only able to win one of three games, dropping them from the top spot in the Division.

    That has not stopped several on the team to continue putting up impressive numbers.

    Catcher Josh Ludy stays consistent with his batting average, runs batted in, and home runs staying near the top in the entire league.

    The squads infielders continue to keep their averages above .300. Johnny Morales leads with a .345 average, while Taylor Ard is a close sec-ond at .341, Hector Crespo stays just above at .303, and Catcher Zach Kometani rounds it out with a .305 clip.

    Near the top of the leagues stats in saves is Gabriel Shaw with 15.

    STANDINGS: WIN LOSS GB LAST 10 (as of 7/20)Grizzlies 36 19 5-5RASCALS 33 20 2.0 7-3Boomers 30 24 5.5 5-5CornBelters 27 26 8.0 5-5Aviators 24 20 11.0 4-6Slammers 21 33 14.5 4-6ThunderBolts 19 34 16.0 3-7

    RASCALS HOME SCHEDULE: (All games @ 7:05pm/Sundays 5:05pm)

    Thurs., Fri., Sat., July 24, 25. 26 against the Greys Sun., Mon., Tue., July 27, 28, 29 against the CornBeltersFor more information, visit

    www.RiverCityRascals.com* Battle at the top

    St. Louis Rams Training Camp Starts Friday The Rams invite their fans to come to their

    facility in Earth City to see the making of the 2014 roster for free.

    Visit www.stlouisrams.com to confirm dates and practice times as they are subject to change:

    Friday, July 25: Practice 1:30 pm. Saturday, July 26: Practice 1:30 pm Sunday, July 27: Practice 3:30 pm Tuesday, July 29: Practice 1:30 pm Thursday, July 31: Practice 3:30 pm Friday, August 1: Practice 1:30 pm Saturday, August 2: Scrimmage 12:30 pm at Edward Jones Dome Monday, August 4: Practice 1:30 pm Tuesday, August 5: Practice 3:30 pm Thursday, August 7: Practice 1:30 pm Monday, August 11: Practice 1:30 pm Tuesday, August 12: Practice 3:30 pm Thursday, August 14: Practice 1:30 pm Tuesday, August 19: Practice 1:30 pm Wednesday, August 20: Practice 1:30 pmMore updates to follow.*And it begins

    Gary Baute, a St. Louis native, may be educated in busi-ness but he lives and breathes sports. As a fan or an athlete, Gary is all sports all the time. He hosted a radio sports program on KFNS, emceed the River City Rascals inaugural season, and co-hosted SportsRadioSTL.com, among many other activities. Currently he broadcasts a radio show on 590 The Man and 1380 The Woman.

    Fill in the blank squares in the grid, making sure that every row, column and 3-by-3 box includes all the digits 1 through 9.

    SUDOKU:

    See solution on page 13

    Tragic Family Drama, Everything I Never Told You

    Reprinted with permission. Missourian Publishing Company. Copyright 2014.

    Tragedy strikes at the onset in Everything I Never Told You, a debut novel by Celeste Ng fea-

    turing a Chinese-American family fraying at the seams.Set in 1970s Middlewood, Ohio, the Lees are brought to the

    brink when 16-year-old Lydia, the oldest, favored child, disap-pears. Foul play is suspectedone doesnt just disappear from their home in the middle of the night.

    The outcome of this blow is devastating for her parents, who rather than pulling together, pull apart, the loss opening unre-solved issues in their marriage. Margaret, Lydias mother, is Cau-casian, a woman with a lifelong dream of becoming a doctor. Her goal is put on hold when she meets James Lee, a Chinese pro-fessor at the college she attends. They instantly fall in love and marry.

    As the years pass, Margaret transfers her desire to be a doctor onto Lydia, whose primary lot in life is to please her parents. Though Margaret and James son is an accomplished student in his own right, Nath is passed over, and his younger sister, Hannah, seems a lost child, an afterthought in the Lees marriage, an unplanned pregnancy that puts the final clamps on Margarets dream.

    Moving back and forth in time, we learn about this marital stressor as well as other issues the couple struggles withchief among them the strain of racial discrimination. James worries that Margaret has always felt she made a mistake in marrying him. While all Margaret has wanted is to do is marry for love, not subject herself to her mothers desire that she wed someone like her, in regard to race and social standing.

    As the familys background comes to light, mystery shrouds Lydias disappearance, a private girl in love with Jack, a neighbor boy with a bad reputation.

    Quiet and intense, Everything I Never Told You is a family drama that reveals its secrets slowly, drawing you in, then revealing a shocking and tragic conclusion.

  • www.mycnews.com Community News - St. Charles County July 23, 2014 11Fuel Summer Activities with the Right FoodTart Cherries are the perfect pick Recipe:

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    Ingredients:1 1/4 cups tart cherry juice 1/4 cup unflavored gelatin1/3 cup honey

    Directions:In a small bowl, stir together the juice and the gelatin until the gelatin is fully dissolved. Pour the mixture into a small saucepan on low-medium heat and add the honey. Continue stirring until well mixed but making sure not to boil. Remove from heat, allowing it to slightly cool before pouring into a rectangular hard candy sheet mold (use a sheet mold tray with 64 molds of 3/4 x 1). Allow it to cool for about 10 minutes or until it begins to gel before transferring into the refrigerator. Place in the refrigerator at least 30 minutes to allow it to set.

    Tip:Instead of a candy sheet mold, try using an ice cube tray or mini muffin tin.

    To get more tips and recipes, and find information on tart

    cherries and recovery, visit www.choosecherries.com.

    1 Kuehl KS, Perrier ET, Elliot DL, Chestnutt J. Efficacy of tart cherry juice in reducing muscle pain during running: a ran-domized controlled trial. J. Int. Soc. Sports. Nutr. 2010;7:17-22.2 Howatson G, McHugh MP, Hill JA, Brouner J, Jewell AP, van Someren KA, Shave RE, Howatson SA. Influence of tart cherry juice on indices of recovery following marathon running. Scand. J. Med. Sci. Sports. 2010 Dec;20(6):843-52.

    Warm weather means the start of training season for many peoplewhether thats preparing for a race or simply beginning a routine of regular biking or swimming. One food that many athletes are adding to their training regimen is tart cherries.

    Studies suggest tart cherry juice may help ath-letes reduce muscle pain after intense exercise, said registered dietitian and sports nutritionist Mitzi Dulan. I like to recommend tart cherry juice to the athletes I work with because it can help them in the recovery process, but everyone can benefit by enjoying these tasty, tart-sweet fruits more often.

    Tart cherries, specifically the Montmorency va-riety, contain anthocyanins that have been found to help reduce inflammation. One recent study found that experienced runners (ages 2644) who drank Montmorency tart cherry juice before and after a long-distance race experienced a faster re-covery of strength and less muscle pain compared

    to those who drank a different beverage. (1)Most of the exercise recovery studies have pro-

    vided participants with two 8-ounce servings of tart cherry juice a day, which is the equivalent of nearly 100 Montmorency tart cherries. (2) Here some of Mitzis tips for enjoying the benefits of tart cherries:

    Revitalizer Smoothie: Blend frozen tart cher-ries, tart cherry juice, coconut water and a splash of vanilla extract for a post-workout smoothie.

    Hit the Trails: Try an easy, do-it-yourself trail mix using dried cherries, almonds, pistachios and whole-grain cereal.

    Give it a shot: Look for tart cherry juice con-centrate in your local supermarket, or buy it on-line. You can mix it with water or drink it straight as a shot.

    Real-Food Fuel: Make your own energy gels or sports chews by mixing tart cherry juice, unfla-vored gelatin and honey.

    Tart Cherry Recovery Chews Prep time: 5 minutes | Cook time: 10 minutes | Yield: 128 individual chews

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  • EVENTS July 24: Bingo Party and Luncheon 11am-1pm, Carrington Place of St. Charles, 2150 West Randolph St. in St. Charles. Lunch served at 11am, game play to follow lunch. For more information, call 636.946.9891, or visit stcharles@carringtonplaces.com.

    July 24: Dive in Movie: Frozen (Rat-ed PG)8:30-10pm, Alligators Creek Aquatic Center (in Civic Park), 403 Civic Park Dr. in OFallon. Cost is $3.50 for resi-dent children and seniors (55+) and $4.50 for resident adults. Non-resi-dent admission is $4.50 for children and seniors and $5.50 for adults. For more information, call 636.272.1626 or 636.474.8130 or visit www.ofallon.mo.us/parks&rec/alligators-creek-aquatic-center.

    July 24: Movie in the Park: The Nut Job 8pm, movie begins at approximately

    9pm, Renaud Spirit Center (RSC) outside, 2650 Tri Sports Circle in OFallon. Event is free, but pre- reg-istration is encouraged. For more in-formation, call 636.474.3732, or visit www.renaudspiritcenter.com.

    July 25: Vietnam Veterans of Amer-ica Chapter 458 Breakfast8:30am, JJs Restaurant in St. Charles, 1215 S Duchesne Dr. Veterans wel-come.

    July 25 through August 29: Sherry Salant, alcohol ink paintings5:15 am 9 pm Monday Friday; 7am 5pmSaturdays; 10am 5pm Sundays. OFallon Cultural Arts Gal-lery in the Renaud Spirit Center, 2650 Tri Sports Circle in OFallon. Free gallery admission and parking. For more information, call 636.474.2732, email Darren at dgranaas@ofallon.mo.us, or visitwww.ofallon.mo.us/parks&rec/cultural-arts.

    July 26: Christmas in July Craft Fair and FundraiserPresented by Tri-County Citizens Advisory Board to Probation & Parole. 9am-3pm, Calvary Church, 3998 Mid Rivers Mall Dr. in St. Pe-ters. For more information, call Nancy Corbin at 636.916.0029 or 636.288.4725.

    July 26: Foundry Bluegrass Fest6pm, Foundry Art Centre, 520 N. Main Center in St. Charles. Fea-turingOzark-born musician and songwriter Dale Pyatt, St. Charles own Cousin Curtis and the Cash Rebates, and St. Louisthe Lonesome Pines Bluegrass Band. Cost is $20, $15 for Foundry Member. For more information, visit www.foundryart-centre.org/performances

    July 26: Free Night: Lego Movie7-10pm, John Weldon Elementary School, 7370 Weldon Spring Rd. in OFallon. For more information, visit www.graceriver.cc

    July 26: New Beginnings Worship Center: The Chosen Ones Gospel Group6pm, New Beginnings Worship Cen-ter, 108 Birdie Hills Rd. in St. Peters.For more information, call 636.544.2030 or 314.269.6304.

    July 27: OFallon Parks and Recre-ation Night4:05pm, game at 5:05 pm, T.R. Hughes Ballpark, 900 T.R. Hughes Blvd. in OFallon. Tickets are $10 ticket. For more information, call 636.240.2287, ext. 242, or visit www.rivercityrascals.com.

    July 27: Dream On Worship Series8, 9:15, 10:45am, SunRise United Methodist Church, 7116 Twin Chim-neys Blvd. in OFallon. For more in-formation, visit www.sunrisefamily.org, or call 636.978.2727.

    July 27-Aug.1: Vacation Bible School at Wentzville Christian Church6-8:30pm, Wentzville Christian Church, 1507 Highway Z in Wentz-ville. Children, ages 3 to 5th grade. Jungle Safari is a VBS filled with fun activities and adventure! Event is free; please register online at wentzvillecc.org/VBS or call the church office at 636.327.6622.

    July 30: Korean Mission: Kong-Duc Presbyterian Church Visit from Seoul, Korea Dardenne Pres-byterian Church, 7400 State Hwy N in OFallon. Reservations will be-gin on July 13 and end July 27. Call Dardenne Presbyterians church of-fice at 636.561.4347 for reservations.

    August 1-3, 8-10: Act Two Theatre: The Curious SavageFriday and Saturday at 8pm, Sunday matinees at 2pm, Performing Arts Theater at the St. Peters City Hall Cul-tural Arts Centre. Reserved Seating is $14 for Students and Seniors and $18 for Adults for all shows.Group pric-ing of $12 is available for groups of 12 or more. For more information, call 636.219.0150, email info@acttwothe-atre.com, or visit www.acttwotheatre.com.

    Aug. 2: Western St. Charles County Chamber Back to School Family Fair8am 1 pm, Morning Star Church, 600 Feise Rd. in Dardenne Prairie. Free school supplies for children and fun activities. For more information, visit www.westernstcharlescoun-tychamber.com.

    Aug. 2: St. Louis International Chil-drens Film Festival: My Dog the Champion1 pm., Lindenwood University, Young Hall. Appropriate for all ages. For more information, visit www.cin-emastlouis.org/about-festival.August 3: Treasure Emporium Flea

    Market11am-7pm, Sacred Heart Church annual picnic, 100 Thompson Dr. in Troy.

    Aug. 3: St. Francis of Assisi/Immac-ulate Conception Portage Picnic12pm 7pmWashington & 2nd. Streets in Portage Des Sioux. Chicken and beef dinners, $10 for adults, $5 for children. Bingo, theme basket raffle, garden tractor pull, childrens games, and live music. For more information, call 314.623.3299.

    Aug. 4-8: Vacation Bible School 9 11:30 am, Dardenne Baptist Church For children grades 1 through 6. Ad-mission is free. Kids will enjoy a week of fun, food, and exciting learning. To register, or for more information, call 636.625.2015 or visit www.darden-nebaptistchurch.org.

    Aug. 9: St. Louis International Chil-drens Film Festival: Welcome to the Space Show1 pm., Lindenwood University, Young Hall. Appropriate for ages 8 and older. For more information, visit www.cinemastlouis.org/about-festival.

    Aug. 9: Troy Area Chamber of Commerce Memories on Main Street8am-4pm, downtown Troy. 35 classes of cars, live music, vendors. For more information, visit troyonthemove.com, or call 636.462.8769.

    Aug. 9: National Night Out5:30-8:30pm, Dardenne Prairie City Park, 2032 Hanley Rd. Enjoy life size games such as Tic Tac Toe, Con-nect Four, Kerplunk; a showing of the Lego Movie and more. For more information, contact Melissa Nord-mann at 636.755.5308, or Melissa@dardenneprairie.org

    Aug. 23 Summer Concert Series: Funky Butt Brass Band7-10pm, Dardenne Prairie City Hall, 2032 Hanley Rd. For more informa-tion, contact Melissa Nordmann at 636.755.5308, or Melissa@darden-neprairie.org

    Send your event to editor@mycnews.com and we'll print it!

    July 23, 2014 Community News - St. Charles County www.mycnews.com12 Whats Happening

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  • Aug. 24: Center for Autism Educa-tion 11th Annual Golf Tournament.11:30am-6pm, Bear Creek Golf Club, 158 Bear Creek Dr. in Wentzville. Cost is $380 for a foursome, includes 18 holes of golf with cart, lunch, dinner and beer. For more infor-mation, or to register, contact Tony Bryan at tbryan@teachautism.org or 636.978.7785.

    Aug. 25-Nov. 17: Morning Star Church DivorceCare Support GroupMonday evenings, Morning Star Church, 1600 Feise Rd. in Dardenne Prairie. One-time fee of $20 to cover the cost of materials. Deadline to register is Aug. 11. For more infor-mation, or to register, visit www.msc-wired.org.

    August 28: Ralph Kaufman Golf Tournament to benefit childrens charitiesRegistration 10am, Whitmoor Coun-try Club, 1100 Whitmoor Drive in St. Charles. Lunch at 11am, shotgun start at noon. Register online at www.ralphkaufmanmemorial.com.

    September 5 & 6: Christmas Tradi-tions Auditions Signups begin July 25, visit www.st-charleschristmas.com/auditions to sign-up and for more information. Spots for caroler, character, or inter-national Santa during Christmas Tra-ditions 2014.

    Sept. 20: St. Charles County His-torical Society House Tour 12-4pm, St. Charles County His-torical Society, 101 S. Main St. in St. Charles. See inside 18th and 19th century houses and an unbelievable Church. for more information, or to buy tickets, visit www.scchs.org, or call 636.946.9828.

    Sept. 27: Light the Night Fundrais-ing WalkRegistration at 5pm, walk starts at 7:30pm, Forest Parks Central Fields.For more information call 314.590.2230 or visit www.lightthe-night.org/gat.

    Ongoing Events

    1st Monday: Gardeners of St. Charles County Monthly Meet-ing6:30pm. Location varies. 314.304.7480.

    2nd Monday: Winghaven Civil War Round Table6:30pm, Midwest BankCentre board room, 2299 Technology Dr. OFallon. For more informaiton call Mike at 314.276.5018.

    4th Monday: American Legion Post 388 Meets6:30 pm at Holy Cross Lu-theran Church, 607 Westridge. 636.219.0553.

    Every Monday: St. Peters Rotary ClubNoon at St. Peters City Hall, One St. Peters Centre Blvd. www.stpetersro-tary.org.

    Every Monday: The Seasoned Eye Carvers meeting.9am-noon, St. Charles Senior Citi-zens Center, 1455 Fairgrounds. For more information, visit www.st-charlesareawoodcarvers.com.

    Every Monday, Wednesday and Fri-day: Fitness First Exercise Classes9:30-10:30am, American Legion Hall, 504 Luetkenhaus Blvd., Wentz-ville. 314.369.6521.

    Tuesday and Friday Evenings: Tae Kwon Do ClassesDardenne Presbyterian Church, 7400 South Outer 364 in Dardenne Prairie. For more information, call 636.561.4347.

    1st Tuesday: Fleur de Lis Garden Society6:30pm at the Kisker Road Library, 1000 Kisker Road. Info: Jeanne at 314.605.8563.

    2nd Tuesday: Show-me Stitchers Embroiderers Guild of America 7pm at the Ladue Chapel. Info: www.showmestitchers.com.

    Last Tuesday of every month, St. Charles American Legion Post 312 spaghetti dinner.5pm, St. Charles American Legion Post 312, 2500 Raymond Drive in St. Charles. $5 per person. For more information call Post 312 at 636.947.7666.

    4th Tuesday: OFallon Garden Club6:30pm at Sunrise Methodist Church, 7116 Twin Chimney Blvd. Info: Barb at 636.978.5930.

    Every Tuesday: Kiwanis Club of St. CharlesNoon-1pm at Bogey Hills Coun-try Club, 1120 Country Club Rd. in St.Charles.

    Every Tuesday: St. Charles Opti-mist ClubNoon-1pm at Pios Restaurant.

    Every Tuesday: Quilting Guild at the OFallon Family YMCA1-4pm Free. Quilt for local charities. No sewing experience required.

    Every Tuesday: Toastmasters Meet-ing7pm at the Renaud Spirit Center, 2650 Tri Sports Circle, OFallon. Info: 636.379.2505.

    Every Tuesday: Gateway Spotlight ChorUS7:15-9:45pm at First United Method-ist Church, 801 First Capitol Drive in St. Charles. Info: www.gatewayspot-light.org or 636.256.6823.

    Every Tuesday & Thursday: Tai Chi

    at the St. Charles County Family YMCA8-9am & 10:15-11:15am. No experi-ence necessary. 636-928-1928.

    Tuesdays & Thursdays: Get Fit Ex-ercise Classes9-10am and 5:30-6:30pm at Im-maculate Heart of Mary Church Hall, New Melle. 314.369.6521.

    Tuesdays and Fridays: TaeKwonDo Ministry 5:30pm, Dardenne Presbyterian Church 7400 South Outer 364 in Dardenne Prairie. Moses Kim brings Christian teaching into taekwondo. For more information, or to sign up, call 636.561.4347.

    Every Wednesday: Active Older Adults Game Day at the OFallon

    Family YMCA10am Free. Bring a favorite snack to share. Anybody welcome.

    Every Wednesday: Crossroads Cribbage Club 10am Meets at 1380 Boone St., Troy, MO 63379. 636.528.8379.

    Every Wednesday: Mens Golf League5pm, tee off at 5:30 pm at Heritage of Hawk Ridge. www.lakesaintlouis.com, under the parks and recreation section.

    Every Wednesday: Charity Bingo6:45pm VFW Post 5077 sponsors, at VFW Hall, 8500 Veterans Mem. Pkwy., OFallon. 636.272.1945 or www.vfwpost5077.org.

    www.mycnews.com Community News - St. Charles County July 23, 2014 Whats Happening 13

    This Months Shelter: Heartland Humane Society of MissouriPO Box 113, OFallon, MO 63366 636-922-0569 info@hhsrescue.org

    The U.S. Humane Society estimates 6 to 8 million dogs and cats enter shelters each year, and 3 to 4 million are euthanized. Please do your part to control overpopulation and to

    limit the number of unwanted animals. SPAY AND NEUTER YOUR PETS!

    If youve adopted a new family

    member that you saw in Community News, send us a

    picture of you and your new pal. Also

    include a brief story about your pets background and how theyre doing now. Wed

    love to share your happy story with other readers!

    Community News, 2139 Bryan Valley Commercial Dr.,

    OFallon, MO 63366 or editor@

    mycnews.com.

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  • July 23, 2014 Community News - St. Charles County www.mycnews.com14

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  • www.mycnews.com Community News - St. Charles County July 23, 2014 15

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    Chamber. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cheese . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Better You . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    Movie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Real Estate/Automotive . . . .

    Coupon Crazy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Whats Happening . . . . . . . . .Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    July 11, 2007 Vol 9 No 28

    Follow these tips to keep your family and pets safe from mosquitoes.

    See MOSQUITO page 3

    Mosquito Season

    ( A R A ) lanoitaN -

    Friendship Day is Au-gust 5 and in light of a recent survey that indicates w o m e n place high v a l u e on their friendships, Olay is oering women a chance to treat themselves with a trip to New York City. Olay is hosting a summer contest called Light Up Your Life. Women

    can upload a two-min-ute video describing how a close friend lights up their life to www.ra-

    diancerib-bons.com.

    -test closes Aug. 31,

    in October. No purchase is neces-sary. For ocial contest rules, visit www.radianceribbons.com.

    Light Up Your Life Contest invites Women to Honor Friendships

    By Shelly A. SchneiderMissouri is home to about 50 species of mosquitoes. Some live less than a week, while others may live several months. Community Health and the Environ-ment states it is only the female mosquito that bites and she does so to obtain the blood meal needed to lay viable eggs.While mosquitoes usually do little more than drive the family from the out-doors to the indoors, they are sometimes

    snamuH .sesaesid suoregnad

    fo sreirracmay contract malaria, yellow fever, den-gue, and encephalitis; and dogs may get heartworm. Most of these diseases, with the exception of human encephalitis and canine heartworm, have been fairly well eliminated from the entire United States. Health ocials said outbreaks of mosqui-to borne encephalitis have periodically occurred in Missouri. Canine heartworm is an endemic problem, with costs to animal own-ers escalating each year, health ocials warned. Eective mosquito control measures including the elimination of swamp areas, and maintenance eorts to keep road ditches clear and water free have done much to control mosquito for disease transmission.

    -toes: floodwater and permanent water mosquitoes. Floodwater mosquitoes lay their eggs on damp soil where flooding will occur or, in some cases, above the water line in tree holes, artificial con-tainers, or other small bodies of water. When rain fills these areas and floods the in the larval stages, broods of mosquitoes -toes are mainly of the pest variety, and are the first to emerge in the spring months. Many of these mosquitoes are strong fly-ers and may range up to ten miles or more a blood meal to lay eggs.

    their eggs directly on the water surface, -cies in this group do not venture far from their breeding sites.

    If you believe you have a mosquito breed-ing problem on your property, but are not sure, please call the Department of Com-

    fO .tnemnorivnE eht dna htla

    eH ytinum

    -ficials will make an inspection and evalua-tion appointment, and then recommend a possible solution.St. Charles County residents have the

    greatest prevention methods right at their fingertips. Proper maintenance of the property is the first step toward mosquito prevention. All trash and refuse that could property should be adequately graded and

    drained, to prevent any pools or puddles of water that may last ten days or longer. County mosquito control ocer Barry

    McCauley lists several things homeowners may do to keep mosquitoes from ruining their summer:

    November 14, 2007

    Vol. 86 No. 46

    Established 1921 - Wee

    kly for 86 Years

    Family Owned & Opera

    ted

    Serving St. Louis & St. C

    harles Counties

    Movie TalkCover story...

    ...............................3

    Shelly Schneider..................

    ......6

    Old Town Florissant ..........

    8, 9

    Explore St. Charles...........1

    0, 11

    On the Town .......................

    .....12

    Sports with Gary Baute.......

    .. 14

    Its About St. Peters...........

    ... 16

    Movie Review .......................

    . 17

    Classifi eds .......................2

    2, 23

    2139 Bryan Valley Com

    mercial Dr.

    OFallon, MO 63366

    P: 636-379-1775 FX: 6

    36-379-1632

    E-Mail: cnews@centuryt

    el.net

    IN THIS ISSUE

    Inside...COUPON CRAZY

    www.mycnews.com

    See ENTERTAINMENT p

    age 17

    See WOMENS FAIR pag

    e 3

    By Shelly A. Schneider

    The 16th Annual

    Womens Fair

    will be Fun, Fit

    and Fabulous!

    Womens Fair

    FIT!FUN!

    FABULOUS

    ! ,ysub oot steg ti erofeb ,seidaL .renroctake a day for

    you. Now is the time to dna tnemevorpmi-fles rof esruoc a tes

    self-awareness and to have

    fun in the

    process! Women will fi nd th

    e answers

    to questions on health, fam

    ily, career,

    image, fashion, and more

    at the 2007

    Womens Fair Fun, Fit,

    and Fabu-

    lous set for Saturday, No

    v. 17, at St.

    Charles Community College.

    sented by the college in p

    artnership

    with JCPenney and SSM

    St. Joseph

    Health Center-Hospital Wes

    t, will take

    place from 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m.

    in the Stu-

    dent Center on the SCC Ca

    mpus, 4601

    Mid Rivers Mall Drive in C

    ottleville.

    Women from throughout

    the area

    will gather for a day of edu

    cation, re-

    laxation, prizes, food, and fu

    n, includ-

    ing nine mini-seminars, a fas

    hion show

    and keynote speaker, and m

    ore than 50

    vendors displaying produc

    ts and ser-

    vices.

    exhibits and seminars and a c

    ontinental

    cial $20 VIP tickets includ

    e a fashion

    show, keynote speaker, and

    full-course

    luncheon catered by Grapp

    a Grill in

    addition to the breakfast, ex

    hibits, and

    seminars. For the fourth c

    onsecutive

    year, JCPenney will host the

    lunchtime

    fashion show, with styles

    for all ages

    as well as automatic entry in

    to a grand

    prize drawing a personal

    beauty bas-

    ket courtesy of JCPenney.

    fair gives participants nine

    mini-semi-

    nars to choose from includ

    ing infor-

    mation on exercise, fi tness, b

    reast care,

    urinary incontinence, and

    plastic sur-

    gery. Other personal improv

    ement and

    awareness topics include bra

    fi tting and

    wardrobe, ups and dos f

    or holiday

    hair, makeup made easy, an

    d the spirit

    the spirit. Seminar sess

    ions (three topics to

    choose from during each t

    ime frame)

    begin at 9:30 a.m., 10:40 a.m

    ., and 1:30 s

    at 11:45 a.m. and runs unti

    l 1:15 p.m.

    Doors open at 8:30 a.m.

    A special feature during

    the lun- ygrene-hgih a eb lliw raey siht noehc

    presentation by author Dan

    Coughlin. Chris Kattan a

    nd Carmen Electra in Yari Film

    Groups Christmas in Wonde

    rland - 2007

    FOUR GREAT PUBLICATIONSHuneke Publications, Inc. offers four publications: two weekly newspapers and two news magazines, each covering a unique market segment within St. Louis County and St. Charles County. As a member of the Missouri Press Association, all of our publications feature verified circulation and an earned credibility among our peers.

    COMMUNITY NEWSFirst published in 1921, Community News is the longestpublished weekly newspaper in the St. Louis metropolitanarea and has established a large audience of loyal readers.Community News circulates across a broad geographic regionwith newstands, home throw and online subscription.

    OUR TOWN MAGAZINEPublished bi-monthly, Our Town is direct mailed to all business addresses in its service area, plus online subscribers. It is a unique business-to-business magazine featuring chamber of commerce news plus articles on the economy, technology, human resources, and marketing.

    COMMUNITY NEWS - St. Charles CountyPublished weekly with a powerful circulation combination of newsstands, home throw, and online subscription. The St. Charles County edition features countywide coverage including the cities of: St. Charles, St. Peters, Cottleville, Weldon Spring, OFallon, Dardenne Prairie, Lake St. Louis, and Wentzville, plus Troy.

    CROSSROADS MAGAZINEThis monthly lifestyle magazine covers the fast-growing Wentzville and Lake St. Louis areas. It is direct mailed with additional copies available in newsstands, plus online subscribers.

    Our publications use a combination of online subscription, direct mail, home delivery, and voluntary circulation methods. Voluntary refers to a circulation method where readers voluntarily choose to pick up a publication to read. This method is powerful because locations are carefully chosen and newsstands are monitored for 100% pick up. Community News has developed a network of over 650 convenient locations including every major supermarket chain. Our voluntary method is powerful for three reasons: 1 QUALITY READERS A voluntary reader is an interested reader, actively outside of the home, in stores, seeking out information about the community 2 TOTAL UTILITY 100% pick up assures no wasted papers. Every paper reaches an interested reader, yielding a full value for the entire print run. 3 EXPANDING SET Every print run reaches a unique

    group of readers, because the majority of voluntary readers are occasional readers. Over time, these unique groups add up to a readership size about three times greater than the print run.

    -

    St. Louis St. Charles Combined

    St. Louis St. Charles Combined

    St. Louis St. Charles Combined

    Cooling ItCooling It

    May/June 201

    1

    2139 Bryan Valley Commercial DriveOFallon, MO 63366

    P 636.379.1775 F 636.379.1632

    cnews@centurytel.netofcnews@centurytel.net

    www.mycnews.com

    City . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . School . . . . . . . . . . . . . Religion. . . . . . . . . . . .

    2139 Bryan Valley Commercial Dr. OFallon, MO 63366 P: 636.379.1775 F: 636.379.1632 E: ofcnews@centurytel.net www.mycnews.com

    4 5 6

    121415

    IN T

    HIS

    ISSU

    E

    79

    10161822

    Chamber. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cheese . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Better You . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    Movie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Real Estate/Automotive . . . .

    Coupon Crazy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Whats Happening . . . . . . . . .Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    July 11, 2007 Vol 9 No 28

    Follow these tips to keep your family and pets safe from mosquitoes.

    See MOSQUITO page 3

    Mosquito Season

    ( A R A ) lanoitaN -

    Friendship Day is Au-gust 5 and in light of a recent survey that indicates w o m e n place high v a l u e on their friendships, Olay is oering women a chance to treat themselves with a trip to New York City. Olay is hosting a summer contest called Light Up Your Life. Women

    can upload a two-min-ute video describing how a close friend lights up their life to www.ra-

    diancerib-bons.com.

    -test closes Aug. 31,

    in October. No purchase is neces-sary. For ocial contest rules, visit www.radianceribbons.com.

    Light Up Your Life Contest invites Women to Honor Friendships

    By Shelly A. SchneiderMissouri is home to about 50 species of mosquitoes. Some live less than a week, while others may live several months. Community Health and the Environ-ment states it is only the female mosquito that bites and she does so to obtain the blood meal needed to lay viable eggs.While mosquitoes usually do little more than drive the family from the out-doors to the indoors, they are sometimes

    snamuH .sesaesid suoregnad

    fo sreirracmay contract malaria, yellow fever, den-gue, and encephalitis; and dogs may get heartworm. Most of these diseases, with the exception of human encephalitis and canine heartworm, have been fairly well eliminated from the entire United States. Health ocials said outbreaks of mosqui-to borne encephalitis have periodically occurred in Missouri. Canine heartworm is an endemic problem, with costs to animal own-ers escalating each year, health ocials warned. Eective mosquito control measures including the elimination of swamp areas, and maintenance eorts to keep road ditches clear and water free have done much to control mosquito for disease transmission.

    -toes: floodwater and permanent water mosquitoes. Floodwater mosquitoes lay their eggs on damp soil where flooding will occur or, in some cases, above the water line in tree holes, artificial con-tainers, or other small bodies of water. When rain fills these areas and floods the in the larval stages, broods of mosquitoes -toes are mainly of the pest variety, and are the first to emerge in the spring months. Many of these mosquitoes are strong fly-ers and may range up to ten miles or more a blood meal to lay eggs.

    their eggs directly on the water surface, -cies in this group do not venture far from their breeding sites.

    If you believe you have a mosquito breed-ing problem on your property, but are not sure, please call the Department of Com-

    fO .tnemnorivnE eht dna htla

    eH ytinum

    -ficials will make an inspection and evalua-tion appointment, and then recommend a possible solution.St. Charles County residents have the

    greatest prevention methods right at their fingertips. Proper maintenance of the property is the first step toward mosquito prevention. All trash and refuse that could property should be adequately graded and

    drained, to prevent any pools or puddles of water that may last ten days or longer. County mosquito control ocer Barry

    McCauley lists several things homeowners may do to keep mosquitoes from ruining their summer:

    November 14, 2007

    Vol. 86 No. 46

    Established 1921 - Wee

    kly for 86 Years

    Family Owned & Opera

    ted

    Serving St. Louis & St. C

    harles Counties

    Movie TalkCover story...

    ...............................3

    Shelly Schneider..................

    ......6

    Old Town Florissant ..........

    8, 9

    Explore St. Charles...........1

    0, 11

    On the Town .......................

    .....12

    Sports with Gary Baute.......

    .. 14

    Its About St. Peters...........

    ... 16

    Movie Review .......................

    . 17

    Classifi eds .......................2

    2, 23

    2139 Bryan Valley Com

    mercial Dr.

    OFallon, MO 63366

    P: 636-379-1775 FX: 6

    36-379-1632

    E-Mail: cnews@centuryt

    el.net

    IN THIS ISSUE

    Inside...COUPON CRAZY

    www.mycnews.com

    See ENTERTAINMENT p

    age 17

    See WOMENS FAIR pag

    e 3

    By Shelly A. Schneider

    The 16th Annual

    Womens Fair

    will be Fun, Fit

    and Fabulous!

    Womens Fair

    FIT!FUN!

    FABULOUS

    ! ,ysub oot steg ti erofeb ,seidaL .renroctake a day for

    you. Now is the time to dna tnemevorpmi-fles rof esruoc a tes

    self-awareness and to have

    fun in the

    process! Women will fi nd th

    e answers

    to questions on health, fam

    ily, career,

    image, fashion, and more

    at the 2007

    Womens Fair Fun, Fit,

    and Fabu-

    lous set for Saturday, No

    v. 17, at St.

    Charles Community College.

    sented by the college in p

    artnership

    with JCPenney and SSM

    St. Joseph

    Health Center-Hospital Wes

    t, will take

    place from 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m.

    in the Stu-

    dent Center on the SCC Ca

    mpus, 4601

    Mid Rivers Mall Drive in C

    ottleville.

    Women from throughout

    the area

    will gather for a day of edu

    cation, re-

    laxation, prizes, food, and fu

    n, includ-

    ing nine mini-seminars, a fas

    hion show

    and keynote speaker, and m

    ore than 50

    vendors displaying produc

    ts and ser-

    vices.

    exhibits and seminars and a c

    ontinental

    cial $20 VIP tickets includ

    e a fashion

    show, keynote speaker, and

    full-course

    luncheon catered by Grapp

    a Grill in

    addition to the breakfast, ex

    hibits, and

    seminars. For the fourth c

    onsecutive

    year, JCPenney will host the

    lunchtime

    fashion show, with styles

    for all ages

    as well as automatic entry in

    to a grand

    prize drawing a personal

    beauty bas-

    ket courtesy of JCPenney.

    fair gives participants nine

    mini-semi-

    nars to choose from includ

    ing infor-

    mation on exercise, fi tness, b

    reast care,

    urinary incontinence, and

    plastic sur-

    gery. Other personal improv

    ement and

    awareness topics include bra

    fi tting and

    wardrobe, ups and dos f

    or holiday

    hair, makeup made easy, an

    d the spirit

    the spirit. Seminar sess

    ions (three topics to

    choose from during each t

    ime frame)

    begin at 9:30 a.m., 10:40 a.m

    ., and 1:30 s

    at 11:45 a.m. and runs unti

    l 1:15 p.m.

    Doors open at 8:30 a.m.

    A special feature during

    the lun- ygrene-hgih a eb lliw raey siht noehc

    presentation by author Dan

    Coughlin. Chris Kattan a

    nd Carmen Electra in Yari Film

    Groups Christmas in Wonde

    rland - 2007

    FOUR GREAT PUBLICATIONSHuneke Publications, Inc. offers four publications: two weekly newspapers and two news magazines, each covering a unique market segment within St. Louis County and St. Charles County. As a member of the Missouri Press Association, all of our publications feature verified circulation and an earned credibility among our peers.

    COMMUNITY NEWSFirst published in 1921, Community News is the longestpublished weekly newspaper in the St. Louis metropolitanarea and has established a large audience of loyal readers.Community News circulates across a broad geographic regionwith newstands, home throw and online subscription.

    OUR TOWN MAGAZINEPublished bi-monthly, Our Town is direct mailed to all business addresses in its service area, plus online subscribers. It is a unique business-to-business magazine featuring chamber of commerce news plus articles on the economy, technology, human resources, and marketing.

    COMMUNITY NEWS - St. Charles CountyPublished weekly with a powerful circulation combination of newsstands, home throw, and online subscription. The St. Charles County edition features countywide coverage including the cities of: St. Charles, St. Peters, Cottleville, Weldon Spring, OFallon, Dardenne Prairie, Lake St. Louis, and Wentzville, plus Troy.

    CROSSROADS MAGAZINEThis monthly lifestyle magazine covers the fast-growing Wentzville and Lake St. Louis areas. It is direct mailed with additional copies available in newsstands, plus online subscribers.

    Our publications use a combination of online subscription, direct mail, home delivery, and voluntary circulation methods. Voluntary refers to a circulation method where readers voluntarily choose to pick up a publication to read. This method is powerful because locations are carefully chosen and newsstands are monitored for 100% pick up. Community News has developed a network of over 650 convenient locations including every major supermarket chain. Our voluntary method is powerful for three reasons: 1 QUALITY READERS A voluntary reader is an interested reader, actively outside of the home, in stores, seeking out information about the community 2 TOTAL UTILITY 100% pick up assures no wasted papers. Every paper reaches an interested reader, yielding a full value for the entire print run. 3 EXPANDING SET Every print run reaches a unique

    group of readers, because the majority of voluntary readers are occasional readers. Over time, these unique groups add up to a readership size about three times greater than the print run.

    -

    St. Louis St. Charles Combined

    St. Louis St. Charles Combined

    St. Louis St. Charles Combined

    Cooling ItCooling It

    May/June 201

    1

    58206_CirMap.indd 2 7/5/11 3:30 PM

    2139 Bryan Valley Commercial DriveOFallon, MO 63366

    P 636.379.1775 F 636.379.1632

    cnews@centurytel.netofcnews@centurytel.net

    www.mycnews.com

    City . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . School . . . . . . . . . . . . . Religion. . . . . . . . . . . .

    2139 Bryan Valley Commercial Dr. OFallon, MO 63366 P: 636.379.1775 F: 636.379.1632 E: ofcnews@centurytel.net www.mycnews.com

    4 5 6

    121415

    IN T

    HIS

    ISSU

    E

    79

    10161822

    Chamber. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cheese . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Better You . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    Movie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Real Estate/Automotive . . . .

    Coupon Crazy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Whats Happening . . . . . . . . .Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    July 11, 2007 Vol 9 No 28

    Follow these tips to keep your family and pets safe from mosquitoes.

    See MOSQUITO page 3

    Mosquito Season

    ( A R A ) lanoitaN -

    Friendship Day is Au-gust 5 and in light of a recent survey that indicates w o m e n place high v a l u e on their friendships, Olay is oering women a chance to treat themselves with a trip to New York City. Olay is hosting a summer contest called Light Up Your Life. Women

    can upload a two-min-ute video describing how a close friend lights up their life to www.ra-

    diancerib-bons.com.

    -test closes Aug. 31,

    in October. No purchase is neces-sary. For ocial contest rules, visit www.radianceribbons.com.

    Light Up Your Life Contest invites Women to Honor Friendships

    By Shelly A. SchneiderMissouri is home to about 50 species of mosquitoes. Some live less than a week, while others may live several months. Community Health and the Environ-ment states it is only the female mosquito that bites and she does so to obtain the blood meal needed to lay viable eggs.While mosquitoes usually do little more than drive the family from the out-doors to the indoors, they are sometimes

    snamuH .sesaesid suoregnad

    fo sreirracmay contract malaria, yellow fever, den-gue, and encephalitis; and dogs may get heartworm. Most of these diseases, with the exception of human encephalitis and canine heartworm, have been fairly well eliminated from the entire United States. Health ocials said outbreaks of mosqui-to borne encephalitis have periodically occurred in Missouri. Canine heartworm is an endemic problem, with costs to animal own-ers escalating each year, health ocials warned. Eective mosquito control measures including the elimination of swamp areas, and maintenance eorts to keep road ditches clear and water free have done much to control mosquito for disease transmission.

    -toes: floodwater and permanent water mosquitoes. Floodwater mosquitoes lay their eggs on damp soil where flooding will occur or, in some cases, above the water line in tree holes, artificial con-tainers, or other small bodies of water. When rain fills these areas and floods the in the larval stages, broods of mosquitoes -toes are mainly of the pest variety, and are the first to emerge in the spring months. Many of these mosquitoes are strong fly-ers and may range up to ten miles or more a blood meal to lay eggs.

    their eggs directly on the water surface, -cies in this group do not venture far from their breeding sites.

    If you believe you have a mosquito breed-ing problem on your property, but are not sure, please call the Department of Com-

    fO .tnemnorivnE eht dna htla

    eH ytinum

    -ficials will make an inspection and evalua-tion appointment, and then recommend a possible solution.St. Charles County residents have the

    greatest prevention methods right at their fingertips. Proper maintenance of the property is the first step toward mosquito prevention. All trash and refuse that could property should be adequately graded and

    drained, to prevent any pools or puddles of water that may last ten days or longer. County mosquito control ocer Barry

    McCauley lists several things homeowners may do to keep mosquitoes from ruining their summer:

    November 14, 2007

    Vol. 86 No. 46

    Established 1921 - Wee

    kly for 86 Years

    Family Owned & Opera

    ted

    Serving St. Louis & St. C

    harles Counties

    Movie TalkCover story...

    ...............................3

    Shelly Schneider..................

    ......6

    Old Town Florissant ..........

    8, 9

    Explore St. Charles...........1

    0, 11

    On the Town .......................

    .....12

    Sports with Gary Baute.......

    .. 14

    Its About St. Peters...........

    ... 16

    Movie Review .......................

    . 17

    Classifi eds .......................2

    2, 23

    2139 Bryan Valley Com

    mercial Dr.

    OFallon, MO 63366

    P: 636-379-1775 FX: 6

    36-379-1632

    E-Mail: cnews@centuryt

    el.net

    IN THIS ISSUE

    Inside...COUPON CRAZY

    www.mycnews.com

    See ENTERTAINMENT p

    age 17

    See WOMENS FAIR pag

    e 3

    By Shelly A. Schneider

    The 16th Annual

    Womens Fair

    will be Fun, Fit

    and Fabulous!

    Womens Fair

    FIT!FUN!

    FABULOUS

    ! ,ysub oot steg ti erofeb ,seidaL .renroctake a day for

    you. Now is the time to dna tnemevorpmi-fles rof esruoc a tes

    self-awareness and to have

    fun in the

    process! Women will fi nd th

    e answers

    to questions on health, fam

    ily, career,

    image, fashion, and more

    at the 2007

    Womens Fair Fun, Fit,

    and Fabu-

    lous set for Saturday, No

    v. 17, at St.

    Charles Community College.

    sented by the college in p

    artnership

    with JCPenney and SSM

    St. Joseph

    Health Center-Hospital Wes

    t, will take

    place from 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m.

    in the Stu-

    dent Center on the SCC Ca

    mpus, 4601

    Mid Rivers Mall Drive in C

    ottleville.

    Women from throughout

    the area

    will gather for a day of edu

    cation, re-

    laxation, prizes, food, and fu

    n, includ-

    ing nine mini-seminars, a fas

    hion show

    and keynote speaker, and m

    ore than 50

    vendors displaying produc

    ts and ser-

    vices.

    exhibits and seminars and a c

    ontinental

    cial $20 VIP tickets includ

    e a fashion

    show, keynote speaker, and

    full-course

    luncheon catered by Grapp

    a Grill in

    addition to the breakfast, ex

    hibits, and

    seminars. For the fourth c

    onsecutive

    year, JCPenney will host the

    lunchtime

    fashion show, with styles

    for all ages

    as well as automatic entry in

    to a grand

    prize drawing a personal

    beauty bas-

    ket courtesy of JCPenney.

    fair gives participants nine

    mini-semi-

    nars to choose from includ

    ing infor-

    mation on exercise, fi tness, b

    reast care,

    urinary incontinence, and

    plastic sur-

    gery. Other personal improv

    ement and

    awareness topics include bra

    fi tting and

    wardrobe, ups and dos f

    or holiday

    hair, makeup made easy, an

    d the spirit

    the spirit. Seminar sess

    ions (three topics to

    choose from during each t

    ime frame)

    begin at 9:30 a.m., 10:40 a.m

    ., and 1:30 s

    at 11:45 a.m. and runs unti

    l 1:15 p.m.

    Doors open at 8:30 a.m.

    A special feature during

    the lun- ygrene-hgih a eb lliw raey siht noehc

    presentation by author Dan

    Coughlin. Chris Kattan a

    nd Carmen Electra in Yari Film

    Groups Christmas in Wonde

    rland - 2007

    FOUR GREAT PUBLICATIONSHuneke Publications, Inc. offers four publications: two weekly newspapers and two news magazines, each covering a unique market segment within St. Louis County and St. Charles County. As a member of the Missouri Press Association, all of our publications feature verified circulation and an earned credibility among our peers.

    COMMUNITY NEWSFirst published in 1921, Community News is the longestpublished weekly newspaper in the St. Louis metropolitanarea and has established a large audience of loyal readers.Community News circulates across a broad geographic regionwith newstands, home throw and online subscription.

    OUR TOWN MAGAZINEPublished bi-monthly, Our Town is direct mailed to all business addresses in its service area, plus online subscribers. It is a unique business-to-business magazine featuring chamber of commerce news plus articles on the economy, technology, human resources, and marketing.

    COMMUNITY NEWS - St. Charles CountyPublished weekly with a powerful circulation combination of newsstands, home throw, and online subscription. The St. Charles County edition features countywide coverage including the cities of: St. Charles, St. Peters, Cottleville, Weldon Spring, OFallon, Dardenne Prairie, Lake St. Louis, and Wentzville, plus Troy.

    CROSSROADS MAGAZINEThis monthly lifestyle magazine covers the fast-growing Wentzville and Lake St. Louis areas. It is direct mailed with additional copies available in newsstands, plus online subscribers.

    Our publications use a combination of online subscription, direct mail, home delivery, and voluntary circulation methods. Voluntary refers to a circulation method where readers voluntarily choose to pick up a publication to read. This method is powerful because locations are carefully chosen and newsstands are monitored for 100% pick up. Community News has developed a network of over 650 convenient locations including every major supermarket chain. Our voluntary method is powerful for three reasons: 1 QUALITY READERS A voluntary reader is an interested reader, actively outside of the home, in stores, seeking out information about the community 2 TOTAL UTILITY 100% pick up assures no wasted papers. Every paper reaches an interested reader, yielding a full value for the entire print run. 3 EXPANDING SET Every print run reaches a unique

    group of readers, because the majority of voluntary readers are occasional readers. Over time, these unique groups add up to a readership size about three times greater than the print run.

    -

    St. Louis St. Charles Combined

    St. Louis St. Charles Combined

    St. Louis St. Charles Combined

    Cooling ItCooling It

    May/June 201

    1

    2139 Bryan Valley Commercial DriveOFallon, MO 63366

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    City . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . School . . . . . . . . . . . . . Religion. . . . . . . . . . . .

    2139 Bryan Valley Commercial Dr. OFallon, MO 63366 P: 636.379.1775 F: 636.379.1632 E: ofcnews@centurytel.net www.mycnews.com

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    IN T

    HIS

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    Chamber. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cheese . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Better You . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    Movie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Real Estate/Automotive . . . .

    Coupon Crazy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Whats Happening . . . . . . . . .Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    July 11, 2007 Vol 9 No 28

    Follow these tips to keep your family and pets safe from mosquitoes.

    See MOSQUITO page 3

    Mosquito Season

    ( A R A ) lanoitaN -

    Friendship Day is Au-gust 5 and in light of a recent survey that indicates w o m e n place high v a l u e on their friendships, Olay is oering women a chance to treat themselves with a trip to New York City. Olay is hosting a summer contest called Light Up Your Life. Women

    can upload a two-min-ute video describing how a close friend lights up their life to www.ra-

    diancerib-bons.com.

    -test closes Aug. 31,

    in October. No purchase is neces-sary. For ocial contest rules, visit www.radianceribbons.com.

    Light Up Your Life Contest invites Women to Honor Friendships

    By Shelly A. SchneiderMissouri is home to about 50 species of mosquitoes. Some live less than a week, while others may live several months. Community Health and the Environ-ment states it is only the female mosquito that bites and she does so to obtain the blood meal needed to lay viable eggs.While mosquitoes usually do little more than drive the family from the out-doors to the indoors, they are sometimes

    snamuH .sesaesid suoregnad

    fo sreirracmay contract malaria, yellow fever, den-gue, and encephalitis; and dogs may get heartworm. Most of these diseases, with the exception of human encephalitis and canine heartworm, have been fairly well eliminated from the entire United States. Health ocials said outbreaks of mosqui-to borne encephalitis have periodically occurred in Missouri. Canine heartworm is an endemic problem, with costs to animal own-ers escalating each year, health ocials warned. Eective mosquito control measures including the elimination of swamp areas, and maintenance eorts to keep road ditches clear and water free have done much to control mosquito for disease transmission.

    -toes: floodwater and permanent water mosquitoes. Floodwater mosquitoes lay their eggs on damp soil where flooding will occur or, in some cases, above the water line in tree holes, artificial con-tainers, or other small bodies of water. When rain fills these areas and floods the in the larval stages, broods of mosquitoes -toes are mainly of the pest variety, and are the first to emerge in the spring months. Many of these mosquitoes are strong fly-ers and may range up to ten miles or more a blood meal to lay eggs.

    their eggs directly on the water surface, -cies in this group do not venture far from their breeding sites.

    If you believe you have a mosquito breed-ing problem on your property, but are not sure, please call the Department of Com-

    fO .tnemnorivnE eht dna htla

    eH ytinum

    -ficials will make an inspection and evalua-tion appointment, and then recommend a possible solution.St. Charles County residents have the

    greatest prevention methods right at their fingertips. Proper maintenance of the property is the first step toward mosquito prevention. All trash and refuse that could property should be adequately graded and

    drained, to prevent any pools or puddles of water that may last ten days or longer. County mosquito control ocer Barry

    McCauley lists several things homeowners may do to keep mosquitoes from ruining their summer:

    November 14, 2007

    Vol. 86 No. 46

    Established 1921 - Wee

    kly for 86 Years

    Family Owned & Opera

    ted

    Serving St. Louis & St. C

    harles Counties

    Movie TalkCover story...

    ...............................3

    Shelly Schneider..................

    ......6

    Old Town Florissant ..........

    8, 9

    Explore St. Charles...........1

    0, 11

    On the Town .......................

    .....12

    Sports with Gary Baute.......

    .. 14

    Its About St. Peters...........

    ... 16

    Movie Review .......................

    . 17

    Classifi eds .......................2

    2, 23

    2139 Bryan Valley Com

    mercial Dr.

    OFallon, MO 63366

    P: 636-379-1775 FX: 6

    36-379-1632

    E-Mail: cnews@centuryt

    el.net

    IN THIS ISSUE

    Inside...COUPON CRAZY

    www.mycnews.com

    See ENTERTAINMENT p

    age 17

    See WOMENS FAIR pag

    e 3

    By Shelly A. Schneider

    The 16th Annual

    Womens Fair

    will be Fun, Fit

    and Fabulous!

    Womens Fair

    FIT!FUN!

    FABULOUS

    ! ,ysub oot steg ti erofeb ,seidaL .renroctake a day for

    you. Now is the time to dna tnemevorpmi-fles rof esruoc a tes

    self-awareness and to have

    fun in the

    process! Women will fi nd th

    e answers

    to questions on health, fam

    ily, career,

    image, fashion, and more

    at the 2007

    Womens Fair Fun, Fit,

    and Fabu-

    lous set for Saturday, No

    v. 17, at St.

    Charles Community College.

    sented by the college in p

    artnership

    with JCPenney and SSM

    St. Joseph

    Health Center-Hospital Wes

    t, will take

    place from 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m.

    in the Stu-

    dent Center on the SCC Ca

    mpus, 4601

    Mid Rivers Mall Drive in C

    ottleville.

    Women from throughout

    the area

    will gather for a day of edu

    cation, re-

    laxation, prizes, food, and fu

    n, includ-

    ing nine mini-seminars, a fas

    hion show

    and keynote speaker, and m

    ore than 50

    vendors displaying produc

    ts and ser-

    vices.

    exhibits and seminars and a c

    ontinental

    cial $20 VIP tickets includ

    e a fashion

    show, keynote speaker, and

    full-course

    luncheon catered by Grapp

    a Grill in

    addition to the breakfast, ex

    hibits, and

    seminars. For the fourth c

    onsecutive

    year, JCPenney will host the

    lunchtime

    fashion show, with styles

    for all ages

    as well as automatic entry in

    to a grand

    prize drawing a personal

    beauty bas-

    ket courtesy of JCPenney.

    fair gives participants nine

    mini-semi-

    nars to choose from includ

    ing infor-

    mation on exercise, fi tness, b

    reast care,

    urinary incontinence, and

    plastic sur-

    gery. Other personal improv

    ement and

    awareness topics include bra

    fi tting and

    wardrobe, ups and dos f

    or holiday

    hair, makeup made easy, an

    d the spirit

    the spirit. Seminar sess

    ions (three topics to

    choose from during each t

    ime frame)

    begin at 9:30 a.m., 10:40 a.m

    ., and 1:30 s

    at 11:45 a.m. and runs unti

    l 1:15 p.m.

    Doors open at 8:30 a.m.

    A special feature during

    the lun- ygrene-hgih a eb lliw raey siht noehc

    presentation by author Dan

    Coughlin. Chris Kattan a

    nd Carmen Electra in Yari Film

    Groups Christmas in Wonde

    rland - 2007

    FOUR GREAT PUBLICATIONSHuneke Publications, Inc. offers four publications: two weekly newspapers and two news magazines, each covering a unique market segment within St. Louis County and St. Charles County. As a member of the Missouri Press Association, all of our publications feature verified circulation and an earned credibility among our peers.

    COMMUNITY NEWSFirst published in 1921, Community News is the longestpublished weekly newspaper in the St. Louis metropolitanarea and has established a large audience of loyal readers.Community News circulates across a broad geographic regionwith newstands, home throw and online subscription.

    OUR TOWN MAGAZINEPublished bi-monthly, Our Town is direct mailed to all business addresses in its service area, plus online subscribers. It is a unique business-to-business magazine featuring chamber of commerce news plus articles on the economy, technology, human resources, and marketing.

    COMMUNITY NEWS - St. Charles CountyPublished weekly with a powerful circulation combination of newsstands, home throw, and online subscription. The St. Charles County edition features countywide coverage including the cities of: St. Charles, St. Peters, Cottleville, Weldon Spring, OFallon, Dardenne Prairie, Lake St. Louis, and Wentzville, plus Troy.

    CROSSROADS MAGAZINEThis monthly lifestyle magazine covers the fast-growing Wentzville and Lake St. Louis areas. It is direct mailed with additional copies available in newsstands, plus online subscribers.

    Our publications use a combination of online subscription, direct mail, home delivery, and voluntary circulation methods. Voluntary refers to a circulation method where readers voluntarily choose to pick up a publication to read. This method is powerful because locations are carefully chosen and newsstands are monitored for 100% pick up. Community News has developed a network of over 650 convenient locations including every major supermarket chain. Our voluntary method is powerful for three reasons: 1 QUALITY READERS A voluntary reader is an interested reader, actively outside of the home, in stores, seeking out information about the community 2 TOTAL UTILITY 100% pick up assures no wasted papers. Every paper reaches an interested reader, yielding a full value for the entire print run. 3 EXPANDING SET Every print run reaches a unique

    group of readers, because the majority of voluntary readers are occasional readers. Over time, these unique groups add up to a readership size about three times greater than the print run.

    -

    St. Louis St. Charles Combined

    St. Louis St. Charles Combined

    St. Louis St. Charles Combined

    Cooling ItCooling It

    May/June 201

    1

    58206_CirMap.indd 2 7/5/11 3:30 PM

    Our FREE publications are available in over 500 convenient locations, including every Dierbergs, Schnucks and Shop N Save.

    Or, sign up for a FREE ONLINE SUBSCRIPTION at www.mycnews.com

    www.americaschoiceconstruction.com

    www.windowworld.com

  • I dont remember ever watch-ing an All Star game. Some-times it was on TV while I was

    chatting with friends but nobody was watching. This year it hap-

    pened again, only several of us cyn-ics were griping about the boredom levels.

    It ranged from Id rather watch hockey/soccer/foot-ball through little league to Id rather watch grass growand so on.

    I assumed most of us were long since past the age of sports heroes like when we were children. Mine was Stan Musial. If I had one now, it would be catcher Yadi-er Molina, but idolizing baseball heroes became much more difficult as the thousands of dollars in player compensation turned to millions and then tens of mil-lions and then Are they kidding? I still love the game and always will, but watching All Star games falls into the level of watching movie people patting themselves on the back at Oscar presentations. The boredom scale falls to the grass-growing level.

    I guess Im getting old and finicky.I remember watching automobile racing on the big

    oval tracks back when I could tell the difference be-tween GM, Ford and Chrysler cars. Now the only dif-ferences seem to be the names of the drivers. One has

    to get a close-up shot to tell what brand the cars are. It could be a Ford or Chevy, but it might also be a Nissan or a Honda.

    Some go to those big, four-left-turn races to watch the high-speed accidents. No surprise there. Some folks watched hockey to see the bloody brawls until the leagues put a stop to itor some of it. As for racing, if I want to watch high-speed accidents I can sit on a hill next to I-270 during rush houra hill high enough to avoid getting smashed by an airborne, four-wheeled phone-booth after it bounced off an ambulance.

    I guess watching accidents might not be as boring as watching big league pitchers throwing slow fast balls during All Star games. Not that I blame them. Why get serious and risk injuries for a game that doesnt count? It would be like watching race car drivers dawdling around the track while dialing a cell phone to order a hamburger for the next pit stop.

    Dont get me wrong, I dont blame the all-stars for being there for the game. They get paid well for it. Im sure they might need a little extra to buy a faster Porsche to park in their four-car garages during road games.

    To be fair, our country could use some heroes but its left with sports heroes or Willie Nelson cowboys. It surely wont be politicians or bank robbers like Bonnie

    and Clyde during the depression. Besides, banks seem to have their own versions of robbers these days. They wear three-piece suits in plush bank offices with guards to eject process servers.

    The contamination of professional baseball over the last decade or two from muscle enhancement drugs to create more homeruns took a lot of air out of our hero balloons. Mark McGwire who set homerun records soon became a pariah for many Cardinal fans.

    If I needed a hero after all that, it might have been Bill Gates for giving much of his billions away to chari-ties, but then he came out with Windows 8. My poten-tial hero worship deflated into a desire to punch him in the snout after the second crash on my notebook computer.

    I guess Im back to Yadier if I need a hero. I might have watched the All-Star game if he was catchingor not.

    Joe Morice is Community Newss blue-collar philosopher. He was born and raised in Missouri and spent most of his childhood on a farm and adulthood operating big machines. He has no formal training as a writer, unless 60 years of writ-ing about any and everything counts.

    The opinions expressed in this column are Joe Morices alone and do not reflect the opinion of the owners or staff of Community News.

    July 23, 2014 Community News - St. Charles County www.mycnews.com16Over the Fence Joe Morice

    https://twitter.com/@mycnews

    www.pinterest.com/mycnews

    www.facebook.com/mycnews

    All Star Baseball Games and Boredom

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