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  • 8/16/2019 Canadian Geographic - Best Wildlife Photography 2014

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    Images from CanadianGeographic’s Photo Club

    SPECIAL COLLECTOR’S EDITION

          B      E      S      T

    WILDLIFEPHOTOGRAPHY 20

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    PHOTOCLUB

     

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    EDITOR’S NOTEBOOK 5BY TYRONE BURKE 

    INTRODUCTION 7BY MICHELLE VALBERG 

    ON THE PROWL 8

    THINGS WITH WINGS 40

    WHAT’S IN THE WATER 68

    JUNIOR PHOTOGRAPHERS 92

    BEST WILDLIFE

    PHOTOGRAPHY 2014

    8

    40

    68

    92   F   R   O   N   T   C   O   V   E   R  :   J   O   H   N   Z   I   M   M   E   R   M   A   N  ;   B   A   C   K   C   O   V   E   R  :   D   A   V   I   D   W   H   I   T   E

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    Worth the waitSorting through the year’s best wildlife photography is one of the privi-leges of working at Canadian Geographic. Every year I marvel at thecalibre of the images we receive through our contests. Not only amI impressed by the photographic skill, I’m blown away by the patienceit takes to get so close to breaching humpbacks and tiny tree frogs.

    I have wide-eyed admiration for wildlife photographers. Even thoughthe genre has always been my favourite type of photography to lookat, I’ve had lile success actually producing any. Never the most

    patient (or light-footed) person, I frighten off animals long before I geta decent shot.

    Yet, with our photo club members as inspiration, I finally got into awildlife blind this spring and waited it out. Hours before dawn, I seledin next to hundreds of thousands of sandhill cranes, which were pass-ing through Nebraska’s Plae River Valley as they migrated towardCanada’s Far North for the summer.

    Each minute I shivered in the darkness, I gained yet more respectfor the toughness of wildlife photographers. Then the sun finallycrested the horizon, and thousands of cranes stirred and swooped.When a hunting eagle zoomed in and sent the cranes scaering,

    I suddenly understood where wildlife photographers find their patience.There’s no spectacle on Earth that can match nature in action.It’s worth waiting for.

    Tyrone Burke

    Sorting throuorti throleges of workilecalibre of thecaliI impressed b II esse Iit takes to getget

    I have wideI idethe enre haenre

    ESIDENT AND PUBLISHER  André Préfontaine

    E-PRESIDENT, CONTENT CREATION  Gilles Gagnier

    OJECT EDITOR  Tyrone BurkeNIOR EDITOR  Aaron KylieEATIVE DIRECTOR  Suzanne MorinSTOM PUBLISHING MANAGER  Mike Elston

    SOCIATE EDITOR Harry WilsonSISTANT  EDITOR  Nick WalkerW MEDIA EDITOR  Heather YundtCIAL MEDIA EDITOR  Sabrina DoyleSTOM PUBLISHING EDITOR  Michel a Rosano

    NSULTANTS  Roger Bird, Canadian Museum of Nature, Royal Ontarioseum

    OTO EDITOR  Laura StanleyAPHIC DESIGNER  Ksenia NigmanovaODUCTION COORDINATOR  Kendra StielerW MEDIA DEVELOPER  Paul PolitisLOUR TECHNICIAN  Glenn Campbell

    ERNS  Brendan McConnell, Siobhan McClelland, Justin Nalepa,my Thomson

    CULATION MANAGER  Nathalie Cuerrier

    ECTOR, FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION  Michael Edwards, CACOUNTING MANAGER  Cather ine FrameCOUNTING ASSISTANT  Ashley RovitoECUTIVE ASSISTANT   Sandra SmithCEPTIONIST/OFFICE COORDINATOR  Diane Séguin

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    ITAL REPRESENTATION Marc Thomas, Suite 66one (416) 848-9444 or toll-free (866) 779-3486x (416) 628-5561 email : [email protected] 6.com

    6 Lesmill Road, North York, ON M3B 2T5one (416) 360-4151 Fax (416) 360-1526

    nadian Geographic Best Wildlife Photography 2014 is published bynadian Geographic Enterprises on behalf of The Royal Canadianographical Society

    TORIAL OFFICE

    5 Lola Street, Suite 200, Ottawa, ON K1K 4C1

    one: (613) 745-4629 Fax: (613) 744-0947bsite: canadiangeographic.ca

    BN 978-0-9867516-0-8. No part of this publication may beroduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted, in any formby any means, without the prior written consent of the publishera licence from The Canadian Copyright Licensing Agencycess Copyright). For an Access Copyright licence, visit

    cesscopyright.ca or call toll-free (800) 893-5777.

    te of issue: September 2013 Copyright ©2013. All rights reserved.

    nadian Geographic  and design are registered trademarks.Marque déposée.

    ounded in 1929, the Society is a non-profit educational organization.Its object is to advance geographical knowledge and, in particular,

    o stimulate awareness of the significance of geography in Canada’svelopment, well-being and culture. In short, the aim is to make Canada

    better known to Canadians and to the world.

    PRESIDENT

    Dr. Paul Ruest, PhD, Winnipeg

    VICE-PRESIDENTS

    Mr. Bruce Amos, Ottawa; Mr. Gavin Fitch, Calgary

    SECRETARY

    Ms. Beth Dye, Kamloops, B.C.

    TREASURER

    Mr. Keith Exelby, Ottawa

    CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

    John G. Geiger

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    education.canadiangeographic.ca

    The War of 1812

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    Animal insincFrom aop a small cliff, I could see clumps of walruses gruning andwrihing en masse on he beachfron. I was a grea vanage poin,bu I waned o ge closer. Much closer.

    Led by my guide, I crep up slowly, unil I was wihin a mere ofhe herd. The firs hing ha hi me was he smell: an overpoweringscen of 10,000 we animals, like a feid beachfron barnyard. I wasamazing o be so close.

    Under he fla ligh of cloud cover, I sho close-ups of hewalruses’ leahery, ancien-looking skin, bulbous eyes and whiskers.Jus as I decided i was ime o go and urned away, here wasa hunderous sound — he herd was on he move. I fired off a fewshos, bu I wasn’ even sure if my camera was in focus. My sensesold me just shoot .

    The dus kicked up by he walruses creaed an ehereal mis,illuminaed by he sun as i peeked hrough he clouds. In hamomen, everyhing came ogeher. I go “he sho.”

    When phoographing wildlife I ry o be atenive, o anicipaewha an animal will do nex. Even a sligh change can ransform an

    ordinary phoo ino somehing exraordinary, bu you can overhinkhings oo. Someimes a phoographer’s mos valuable ool is insinc.Michelle Valberg

    I wasn’t even sureif my camera wasin focus. My sensestold me ‘just shoot.’ 

    From aop a IFrom ao a Iwrihing en Iw Ibu I wanedb I

    Led by m I II Ihe herd. Thscen of 10, Is Iamazin oa

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    ON THE PROW

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    A wild animal never knows if its most

    recent meal was its last. There are no

    guarantees that the next hunt will be

    fruitful. With ears perked and claws

    drawn, predators need to be constantlyalert. When the time comes to make

    the kill, there is lile room for error. An

    animal needs to eat, or it will eventually

    be eaten itself.

     wild animal nevd ani

    recent mea was ien ea

    guarantees t at tuar t

    fruitful. ith earfr e

    rawn re atorsors

    Swimming upstream to spawn, salmon navigate therush of rapids and leap up waterfalls. All that exertion

    necessitates rejuvenation, and as they rest salmon are

    vulnerable to predators like this hungry black bear,

    photographed by Kevin Mazur.

    Photographer: Kevin MazurLocation:  Near Tofino, B.C.Species:  Black bear and salmonCamera:  Canon EOS 5D Mark II, 70-200 mm lensPortfolio:  mazurimages.ca

    Fast food

    CONTESTrunner-up

    WILDLIFE

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    “Large males oen weigh more than 700 kilograms,

    but my guide estimated that this polar bear was just

    400,” says Jenny Stevens. “The ice melted early,stranding him 80 kilometres from Baffi n Island. My

    guide didn’t think the bear would make it to winter.”

    Photographer: Jenny StevensLocation:  Near Baffi n Island, NunavutSpecies: Polar bearCamera: Nikon D90, 70-200 mm lens

    Rocky road

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    Images from CanadianGeographic’s Photo Club

    SPECIAL COLLECTOR’S EDITION

          B      E      S      T

    WILDLIFEPHOTOGRAPHY 20

    $12.95canadiangeographic.caDISPLAY UNTIL MARCH 31, 2014

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    Kermode bears are one of Canada’s most unique

    animals, and the gene that gives these black bears white

    fur is rare. In parts of their range, less than one per centof bears are white, and even in their densest concentra-

    tions, lile more than 30 per cent have white fur.

    Photographer: Jenny StevensLocation:  Gribbell Island, B.C.Species: Kermode bearCamera: Nikon D90, 400 mm lens

    Rare bear

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    While out fishing in his kayak on the north coast of

    Vancouver Island, Steven Rose spoed this bear in

    search of somewhat humbler prey. “Black bears will li

    rocks and throw them around like pebbles as theymooch around for sea slugs and crabs.”

    Photographer:  Steven RoseLocation:  Near Port Hardy, B.C.Species: Black bearCamera: Canon EOS 5D Mark IV, 200 mm lensPortfolio: stevenrosephotography.com

    Slippery slope

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    During the months they’re awake, grizzlies eat almost

    constantly, but immediately aer hibernation they eat

    very lile. It takes time for their bodies to return to

    normal. This newly awake bear was flipping logs anddigging in the dirt for food when Chris Gale spoed it.

    Wild animals don’t take direction, and geing them in

    the right position is one of wildlife photography’s chal-

    lenges. “This cub was very co-operative,” says Jenaya

    Launstein. “He climbed from branch to branch,snacking on leaves.”

    Photographer: Chris GaleLocation:  Near Buckinghorse River, B.C.Species: Grizzly bearCamera: Nikon D7000, 24-70 mm lensPortfolio: wildnorthphotos.com

    Photographer: Jenaya LaunsteinLocation:  Waterton Lakes National Park, Alta.Species: Black bearCamera: Nikon D300, 200-400 mm lensPortfolio: launsteinimagery.com

    Get up, stand up The bear up there

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    A grizzly bear can take down an elk or even a moose,

    and they’re famous for their skill as salmon fishers, but

    these giant mammals aren’t just carnivores. Given the

    chance, they’ll eat almost anything, including sweet

    berries and bier dandelion stems.

    Photographer: Terry BiltonLocation:  Near McBride, B.C.Species: Grizzly bearCamera: Nikon D7000, 70-200 mm lensPortfolio: terrybiltonphotography.com

    Vegetarian option

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    Some species are threatened by urbanization; others thrive

    in it. The red fox is of the laer group. Feeding on small

    wildlife and scavenging trash, they’ve colonized cities in

    Japan, Australia and Canada — and much in between.Lise De Serres photographed this one in Montreal.

    While scouting campsites for the coming summer, Nat

    Miller came across this photogenic fox lounging in a Kil

    Provincial Park campground. “For half an hour she lay i

    bush and sniffed around. It was the most beautiful fox I

    seen, and the best chance I’ve had to photograph one.

    Photographer: Lise De SerresLocation:  MontrealSpecies: Red foxCamera: Nikon D3S, 70-200 mm lensPortfolio: pbase.com/lizzee

    Photographer: Nathan MillerLocation:  Near Parry Sound, Ont.Species: Red foxCamera: Canon EOS 60D, 300 mm lensPortfolio: amphotographyinfo.ca

    Foxtrot The red fox lounge

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    CONTESTrunner-up

    WILDLIFEThe red fox can carve out a life in the tropics or in the

    Canadian Rockies, where Terri Shaddick photographed

    this one. It owes its adaptability in part to its eatinghabits. These foxes will consume whatever’s around,

    from delectable berries to tiny rodents.

    “I’d spent the day shooting the year’s first snowfall,

    when I noticed something in the distance,” says Shirley

    A. Davis. “I parked, rolled my window down and waitedTo my delight, this coyote troed past with a hare in it

    mouth and no concern for my camera.”

    Photographer: Terri ShaddickLocation:  Jasper National Park, Alta.Species: Red foxCamera: Canon EOS 7D, 300 mm lensPortfolio: epicphotos.ca

    Photographer: Shirley A. DavisLocation:  Near Canmore, Alta.Species: CoyoteCamera: Canon EOS 7D, 100-400 mm lensPortfolio: surelyadavisphoto.com

    Quite a mouthful The waiting game

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    “Usually I head wherever the storms seem to be mov-ing,” says Ian McGregor. “When I saw this

    ominous cloud, I turned down the nearest road

    and captured this image from the side.”

    Photographer: Ian McGregorLocation:  Near Yorkton, SaskatchewanSpecies: 24ºCCamera: Canon 50D, 300 mm lensPortfolio: www.ianmcgregorphotography.com

    Light and shade

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    Wolf packs have a culture all their own. Within the

    pack, wolves will fight with each other to establish

    dominance, but at heart they’re a lot like other dogs.

    They love to play — rough.

    Photographer: John ZimmermanLocation:  Montebello, Que.Species: WolfCamera: Canon 1D Mark IV, 70-200 mm lensPortfolio:  johnzimmermanphotography.ca

    Pack mentality

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    CONTESThonourable

    mention

    WILDLIFE“On a beautiful December day I went for a drive, hoping to find some

    wildlife to photograph,” says Michelle Valberg. “I saw a bit of moveme

    out of the corner of my eye, and only had one opportunity to get a sho

    before the coyote was gone.”

    Photographer: Michelle ValbergLocation:  OawaSpecies: Coyote

    Camera: Nikon D4, 200-400 mm lensPortfolio: michellevalberg.com

    Jump around

    Many animals blend into their native environments,

    but rarely is their camouflage as uniform as this Arctic

    wolf’s. Since the expansive spaces where these wolves

    roam is unusually monochromatic, the perfect camo

    is snow-white.

    Photographer: Bill MaynardLocation:  Montebello, Que.Species: WolfCamera: Nikon D700, 200-400 mm lensPortfolio: coolwildlife.com

    Whiteout

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    For some wildlife images, photographers shiver in

    blinds in the wee hours. Other photos come a bit

    more easily. “This was a very curious wolf,” says

    Jesse Schpakowski. “It approached me, and aer

    a while it even lay down and fell asleep!”

    Photographer: Jesse SchpakowskiLocation:  Peter Lougheed Provincial Park, Alta.Species: WolfCamera: Nikon D90, 300 mm lensPortfolio: wildlensphotography.ca

    Stare down

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    They’ve been persecuted for being among nature’s

    fiercest predators, but lone wolves oen struggle

    to meet their food needs. “They are highly social

    animals,” says Bill Maynard. “Their survival is

    dependant on the co-operation of the pack.”

    Photographer: Bill MaynardLocation:  Montebello, Que.Species: WolfCamera: Nikon D700, 600 mm lensPortfolio: coolwildlife.com

    Wolf pack

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    Wolf pups develop quickly. At just six months

    of age, they are nearly full size. To grow so

    quickly, they need their sleep. “This pup had

     just finished a play session,” says Bill Maynard.

    “I managed to fire a shot off just as he seled in

    for a rather enduring sleep.”

    Plenty of city parks claim to be nature oases,

    but few have the wildlife to back it up. Fish

    Creek Provincial Park, Alta., where Peter

    Vaudry photographed this coyote, is an

    exception. Though surrounded by Calgary,

    it’s home to coyotes, deer, beavers and bears.

    Photographer: Bill Maynard

    Location:  Montebello, Que.Species: WolfCamera: Nikon D300, 200-400 mm lensPortfolio: coolwildlife.com

    Photographer: Peter Vaudry

    Location:  CalgarySpecies: CoyoteCamera: Nikon D300, 300 mm lensPortfolio: vaud.smugmug.com

    Why so serious? On alert

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    During the rut, white-tailed deer can get into some

    intense scraps, but bucks don’t only fight during

    mating season. Other times of year, their conflicts

    are more playful, more like roughhousing than a

    life-or-death duel.

    Photographer: Jim CummingLocation:  Kanata, Ont.Species: White-tailed deerCamera: Canon EOS 7D, 70-200 mm lensPortfolio: redbubble.com/people/darby8

    Bucks unlimited

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    The bighorn sheep’s bales are a force of nature,and this ram’s horns look a lile worse for the wear.

    “It’s a show of power when rams hurl themselves at

    each other,” says James Anderson. “The resounding

    crash echoes through the mountains.”

    Photographer: James AndersonLocation:  Kootenay National Park, B.C.Species: Bighorn sheepCamera: Canon EOS Rebel T2i, 70-250 mm lensPortfolio: flickr.com/photos/jamesa1

    Horn of plenty

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    Sheep are synonymous with meekness, but bighornsheep can be anything but. They’ve even been known

    to aack automobiles. “It looked so gentle,” says

    Francis The. “Yet it had these sharp and powerful

    horns that could hurt any human.”

    Photographer: Francis TheLocation:  Jasper National Park, Alta.Species: Bighorn sheepCamera: Canon EOS Rebel XS, 75-300 mm lens

    Tough customer

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    CONTESTwinner

    WILDLIFE

    They may be tiny, but they’re lethal when they need

    to be. Jumping spiders are less than a centimetre in

    diameter, but when hunger strikes they can precisely

    take down larger prey, and unlike many of their arachnid

    cousins, they don’t need a web to do it.

    Photographer: Alain FrecheeLocation:  Mascouche, Que.Species: Jumping spider with flyCamera: Nikon D90, 105 mm lensPortfolio: pbase.com/alain_frechee

    Webless wonder

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    The smooth green snake is one of Canada’s

    most striking reptiles. Its brightly coloured scalescamouflage it in open grasslands and along the

    edge of bodies of water like Ontario’s Charleston

    Lake, where Shannon McCormick found this one.

    Photographer: Shannon McCormickLocation:  Charleston Lake, Ont.Species: Smooth green snakeCamera: Canon EOS Rebel XTi, 50-250 mm lens

    Serpentine

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    Like other herons, the long-legged green heron stalks its prey while

    standing motionless in shallow waters, but this clever bird also uses

    bait. Green herons set insects and other bits of food on the water

    to tempt fish and frogs into range.

    Photographer: Bill McMullenLocation:  OawaSpecies: Green heronCamera: Canon EOS 7D, 400 mm lensPortfolio: billmcmullenphotography.com

    Took the bait

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    Millions of years before dinosaurs, there were

    spiders. They’ve endured because they’re highly

    effi cient predators. “Watching this one wrap its prey

    was incredible,” says Lise Simoneau. “My finger was

    glued to the shuer. I didn’t want to miss any action.”

    Photographer: Lise SimoneauLocation:  Quebec CitySpecies: European garden spiderCamera: Canon EOS 7D, 180 mm lens

    Web of life

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    THINGS WITH

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    The earliest fossil evidence of the

    evolution of wings in the Western

    Hemisphere was unearthed in Alberta,

    but the first feathers weren’t for flight.

    These prehistoric plumes were usedto impress potential mates. With such

    aesthetic origins, it’s no surprise that

    millions of years later, winged animals

    are still among the most beautiful

    of all species.

    WINGS

    e ear iestea

    evo ution outi

    emisphereis

    but the first fthe

    ese re istse

    Still groggy and not yet ready to launch into theday’s flight, this dragonfly was patient enough to let

    Brian Robin set up his camera and lights. “The bright

    markings are almost neon, and are much easier to

    appreciate when a dragonfly stays still.”

    Photographer: Brian RobinLocation:  Desboro, Ont.Species: Canadian darnerCamera: Pentax K100d, 100 mm macro lensPortfolio: flickr.com/photos/bprobin

    Still life

    CONTESTwinner

    WILDLIFE

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    CONTESThonourable

    mention

    WILDLIFEBirds can be skiish, and even if you have a long lens, it’s tough

    to get close enough to get the shot. “I approached this snowy owl

    slowly, hoping for a decent picture,” says Rick Dobson. “It flew away,

    but took a look at me over its wing as it lied off.”

    Photographer: Rick DobsonLocation:  St. Isidore, Ont.Species: Snowy owlCamera: Canon EOS 30D, 500 mm lensPortfolio: rickdobsonphotography.com

    Flighty

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    Northern saw-whet owls hide away in dense conifers where they’re

    diffi cult to spot. “I was about ready to turn around because of the

    density of the brush,” says Rick Dobson. “I surveyed the

    situation, and this beautiful owl was staring right back at me.”

    Photographer: Rick DobsonLocation:  Amherst Island, Ont.Species: Northern saw-whet owlCamera: Canon EOS 50D, 50 mm lensPortfolio: rickdobsonphotography.com

    Island hideaway

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    Some migrations are like clockwork, with birds returning to the samelocations every year. Snowy owls are far less predictable. Their ranges

    fluctuate: some years they can be spoed as far south as Texas, and

    some years they stick closer to Canadian soil.

    Photographer: Jenaya LaunsteinLocation:  Near CalgarySpecies:  Snowy owlCamera:  Nikon D300, 200-400 mm lensPortfolio: launsteinimagery.com

    Home on the range

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    “This owl generally ignored my presence, apart from th

    one moment when it looked straight down the lens,”

    says John Lowman. “It was just before sunset, and as it

    was hunting it flew toward the camera, revealing the

    intensity of its search for prey.”

    Photographer: John LowmanLocation:  Boundary Bay, B.C.Species:  Snowy owlCamera:  Canon 1D Mark IV, 500 mm lensPortfolio:  johnlowmanphotography.ca

    Intensity

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    Hawks and falcons are the bird species usually favoured by falconers

    as trained hunting partners. Slow and stubborn, it is far less com-

    mon for owls to be trained. This one cooperated with its falconerlong enough for Frank Vadovic to get a few shots of it in action.

    Photographer: Frank VadovicLocation:  Rondeau Provincial Park, Ont.Species: Great horned owlCamera: Nikon D300, 80-400 mm lens

    Just watch me

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    “Northern flickers are common in B.C., and these two came to

    my deck and fought nearly every day for weeks in April,” says

    Krisztina Harasztosi. “Sometimes they’d stand face to face forminutes at a time, then jump into the air and fight again.”

    Photographer: Krisztina HarasztosiLocation:  Gibsons, B.C.Species: Northern flickerCamera: Canon EOS 6D, 70-300 mm lensPortfolio: hakristi.com

    Faceoff 

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    Bald eagles aren’t born with their unmistakable plumage.

    Youthful eagles have dark feathers on their heads, which are

    gradually replaced by white ones at they get older. Just as with

    humans, the bald look is something that comes with age.

    Photographer: Julie DrummondLocation:  Montebello, Que.Species: Bald eagleCamera: Canon EOS Rebel XTi, 75-300 mm lens

    Bold-faced

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    With eyesight five times sharper than a human’s, bald eagles

    are finely tuned hunting machines. But even though they can

    spot prey that’s well over a kilometre away, eagles still end up

    dining on carrion when they fail to catch dinner.

    Photographer: Steven RoseLocation:  Near Port Hardy, B.C.Species: Bald eagleCamera: Canon Mark IV, 400 mm lensPortfolio: stevenrosephotography.com

    Eagle-eyed

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    CONTESTrunner-up

    WILDLIFEWhen soaring on thermals, turkey vultures are oen mistaken for

    eagles or hawks, but their wobbly flying technique is nowhere near

    as graceful. Turkey vultures are actually related to storks, and since

    they’re not hunters, they’re not fancy fliers.

    Photographer: Roger LeekamLocation:  Mount Nemo Conservation Area, Ont.Species: Turkey vultureCamera: Canon EOS 7D, 400 mm lensPortfolio: flickr.com/photos/[email protected]

    Vulture culture

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    CONTESTrunner-up

    WILDLIFEThe hooded merganser’s name doesn’t really do it

     justice. The male of this tiny duck species sports spiky

    feathers that just might be the most impressive mohawk

    in the animal kingdom.

    Photographer: Serge ChenardLocation:  Sherbrooke, Que.Species: Hooded merganserCamera: Canon EOS 1D Mark IV, 800 mm lensPortfolio: sergechenard.zenfolio.com

    How’s my hair?

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    Pygmy nuthatches are usually found in mountain forests, but

    Ron E. Racine photographed this lone nuthatch at his backyard

    fountain. “It had taken a bath and was literally dripping wet.

    I managed to catch a drop just before it fell.”

    Photographer: Ron E. RacineLocation:  Kelowna, B.C.Species: Pygmy nuthatchCamera: Canon EOS 7D, 600 mm lensPortfolio: roneracine.com

    Bathing beauty

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    “It was late winter and all the vegetation was still golden brown,”

    says Ron E. Racine. “With the sun at a low angle, I spoed this

    mallard coming in to land. I took a panning shot that kept the

    duck’s body sharp but blurred its wings and the background.”

    Photographer: Ron E. RacineLocation:  Kelowna, B.C.Species: Mallard duckCamera: Canon EOS 7D, 400 mm lensPortfolio: roneracine.com

    Frozen motion

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    Eagles come to this spot to feed on dead spawned salmon, andthis one could be chasing a seagull away from its meal, but bald

    eagles have also been known to hunt other birds. Able to dive over 160 km/h, they prey on smaller, slower birds.

    Photographer: David HodgeLocation:  Near Harrison Mills, B.C.Species: Bald eagle and Thayer’s gullCamera: Nikon D5100, 18-200 mm lens

    The hunted

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    CONTESTwinner

    WILDLIFE

    Each morning, Monique Lavoie photographs birds

    in her yard. “Aer a fresh snow, this beautiful blue

     jay arrived to enjoy the fluffy snow. Its wings made

    wonderful sprays and gave me exactly what I was

    looking for: an unforgeable image.”

    Photographer: Monique LavoieLocation:  Chelsea, Que.Species: Blue jayCamera: Nikon D7000, 18-200 mm lens

    Snow job

    “Snow buntings look gentle in flight,” says Bill

    McMullen. “They can even resemble a snow-

    storm when they take off together. But then

    they can also be very aggressive with each

    other.” This pair was baling it out to establish

    the pecking order.

    Photographer: Bill McMullenLocation:  Navan, Ont.Species: Snow buntingsCamera: Canon EOS 7D, 400 mm lensPortfolio: billmcmullenphotography.com

    Fight or flight

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    Great blue herons thrive in marshy, shallow waters, so it’s no surprise

    that they’ve benefied from the rebound of beaver populations.

    Yet Linda Stacey didn’t spot this one at a beaver pond, but at

    a dyke created by nature’s other dam builder: humans.

    Photographer: Linda StaceyLocation:  Coquitlam, B.C.Species: Great blue heronCamera: Canon EOS 60D, 100-400 mm lensPortfolio: lindastacey.see.me

    Queen of the dammed

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    Thayer’s gulls summer in the High Arctic, but winter draws them to

    milder spots along the Pacific Coast, like Vancouver’s Granville

    Island. “When you live in a port city, you share it with other urban

    dwellers, including gulls,” says Ivan Petrov.

    Photographer: Ivan PetrovLocation:  VancouverSpecies: Thayer’s gullCamera: Nikon D300s, 18-200 mm lensPortfolio: ivanpetrov23.see.me

    Flapper style

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    The painted lady may be Earth’s best-travelled but-

    terfly. It lives on every continent except Antarcticaand South America, and has been known to venture

    as far north as Nunavut and the Yukon. Natally Klaric

    photographed this one in her Montreal-area garden.

    In Canada, water covers an area roughly the size

    France and England combined. All those lakes anmarshes are prime habitat for iridescent damselfl

    These predatory insects hunt smaller flies along t

    edges of shallow freshwater.

    Photographer: Natally KlaricLocation:  Beaconsfield, Que.Species: Painted lady buerflyCamera: Nikon D700, 105 mm lensPortfolio: flickr.com/photos/affi nity5

    Photographer: Marie-Pier CoutureLocation:  Near Quebec CitySpecies: DamselflyCamera: Canon EOS Rebel XSi, 100 mm lensPortfolio: mariepier-couture.com

    Splash of colour Damsel at rest

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    The colouring of the painted lady buerfly makes

    like the more famous monarch, but painted ladies

    much smaller, measuring only five to six centimetrin diameter. “This one looked lovely, as though it w

    cradled in the leaf,” says Debbie Oppermann.

    Photographer: Debbie OppermannLocation:  Guelph, Ont.Species: Painted lady buerflyCamera: Canon 60D, 100 mm lens

    Cradled away

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    WHAT’S IN THE

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    CONTESTrunner-up

    WILDLIFE

    Moose love water, but not when it’s icebound.

    “We grabbed all the rope we had and ran down

    to the lakeshore,” says Chris Gale. “My buddy

    lassoed her, and about 10 of us helped pull her

    up. Then she walked away, looking back at us

    as if to say thanks.”

    Photographer: Chris GaleLocation:  Muskwa-Kechika Management Area, B.C.Species: MooseCamera: Nikon D7000, 24-70 mm lensPortfolio: wildnorthphotos.com

    Rescue me

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    “Every four years the spawning cycle of sockeye salmon peaks,”

    says Todd Mintz. “They fight the current for 500 kilometres

    upriver to return to their birth place, changing a vibrant red to

    encourage mating, then dying soon aer.” This time, more than

    34 million salmon ran in the Fraser River system.

    Photographer: Todd MintzLocation:  Adams River, B.C.Species: Sockeye salmonCamera: Canon EOS 50D with underwater housing, 10-17 mm lensPortfolio: tmintz.ca

    Swimming upstream

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    CONTESThonourable

    mention

    WILDLIFE“I’ve been photographing these loons for years, and

    they’ve grown very tolerant of my canoe,” says Steven

    Rose. “Two years ago, they even swam up to the boat,

    le a day-old chick beside it, and swam off to feed for

    40 minutes before returning to pick it up.”

    Photographer: Steven RoseLocation:  Havelock, Ont.Species: Common loonCamera: Canon Mark IV, 500 mm lensPortfolio: stevenrosephotography.com

    The babysiers club

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    Even if you live by a lake, you rarely see adult loons

    catch their prey. They hunt and consume most during

    their dives. Unlike their parents, loon chicks feed

    above the waterline, creating photo ops for aentive

    photographers like Peter Ferguson.

    Photographer: Peter FergusonLocation:  Algonquin Provincial Park, Ont.Species: Common loonCamera: Panasonic FZ150

    Mystery dinner

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    The Kermode bears that Kyle Blaney set out to

    photograph proved to be only the opening act of his

     jaunt along the B.C. coast. “We weren’t even looking

    for whales, but noticed this one in the distance.

    It breached over and over again.”

    Photographer: Kyle BlaneyLocation:  Hartley Bay, B.C.Species: Humpback WhaleCamera: Canon EOS 7D, 28-300 mm lensPortfolio: kblaney.com

    The main event

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    “This is muddy terrain along an ATV trail, but thereare a lot of frogs at close range,” says Steeve Marcoux.

    “I look for the position that has the potential for the

    most interesting compositions, then lay on the ground

    and slowly close in on the frog.”

    Photographer: Steeve MarcouxLocation:  Vaudreuil-Dorion, Que.Species: Green frogCamera: Pentax K-01, 100 mm macro lensWebsite: smarcoux.zenfolio.com

    Closing in

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    JUNIOR PHOTOG

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    The legendary French phoographerHenri Carier-Bresson famously saidha your firs 10,000 phoographsare your wors, and if he was righ,

    oday’s youh have a leg up on anygeneraion ha came before. Noonly are cameras ubiquious, buyoung people are learning how ouse hem, and use hem well.

    APHERS

    he legendleHenri Cari lri lha your fiyare your woyo

    oda s ou la l

    Jenaya Launsein se ou o phoograph elk, bu

    couldn’ ge close enough o ge her sho. Then she

    spoted his coyoe, and made he bes of i. “His fur

    was we, and he didn’ look happy abou i. I managed

    o ge a few shos before he coninued along.”

    Photographer: Jenaya LaunsteinLocation:  Waterton Lakes National Park, Alta.Species: CoyoteCamera: Nikon D300, 200-400 mm lensPortfolio: launsteinimagery.com

    Rainy day blues

    CONTESThonourable

    mention

    JUNIORPHOTOGRAPHERS

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