APES 2013- 2014 INDOOR AIR POLLUTION NOTES. INDOOR AIR POLLUTION The quality of indoor air can be two to five times (and even up to 100 times) more polluted

Download APES 2013- 2014 INDOOR AIR POLLUTION NOTES. INDOOR AIR POLLUTION The quality of indoor air can be two to five times (and even up to 100 times) more polluted

Post on 24-Dec-2015

213 views

Category:

Documents

1 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

<ul><li> Slide 1 </li> <li> APES 2013- 2014 INDOOR AIR POLLUTION NOTES </li> <li> Slide 2 </li> <li> INDOOR AIR POLLUTION The quality of indoor air can be two to five times (and even up to 100 times) more polluted than the worst outside air. </li> <li> Slide 3 </li> <li> Slide 4 </li> <li> Common symptoms of exposure to indoor air pollutants include headaches, tiredness, dizziness, nausea, itchy nose, and scratchy throat. More serious effects are asthma and other breathing disorders and cancer. </li> <li> Slide 5 </li> <li> SOURCES OF INDOOR AIR POLLUTANTS </li> <li> Slide 6 </li> <li> COMBUSTION SOURCES: GAS, OIL, KEROSENE AND WOOD STOVES OR FIREPLACES, TOBACCO SMOKE </li> <li> Slide 7 </li> <li> BUILDING MATERIALS: INSULATION, CARPET, CABINETRY, PRESSED WOOD PRODUCTS </li> <li> Slide 8 </li> <li> CHEMICAL PRODUCTS: CLEANING PRODUCTS, PERSONAL CARE PRODUCTS, GLUES, PASTES </li> <li> Slide 9 </li> <li> OUTDOOR SOURCES: RADON, PESTICIDES, POLLEN, OUTDOOR AIR POLLUTION </li> <li> Slide 10 </li> <li> Slide 11 </li> <li> OTHER: PET DANDER, DUST MITES, MOLD, VIRUS </li> <li> Slide 12 </li> <li> RADON GAS Can seep into buildings from the soil Naturally-occurring radioactive gas that is a product of the radioactive decay chain from uranium to stable lead. </li> <li> Slide 13 </li> <li> Slide 14 </li> <li> Slide 15 </li> <li> A variety of methods have been employed to keep the hot or cool air from escaping from our homes installing storm windows and insulation applying caulk and weather-stripping to seal cracks and other openings heating our homes with kerosene, wood, coal, and natural gas. Unfortunately, when we trap in hot or cool air, we also trap in pollutants and sometimes generate more. OVER THE YEARS, BUILDINGS HAVE BEEN MADE MORE AIRTIGHT TO CONSERVE ENERGY. </li> <li> Slide 16 </li> <li> Slide 17 </li> <li> Slide 18 </li> <li> Slide 19 </li> <li> Testing indoor air is not practical or affordable unless a specific pollutant (ex. radon) is suspected. It is much more efficient to examine the home and review activities, furnishings, conditions, and recent changes to develop a list of likely pollutants. IMPROVING INDOOR AIR QUALITY </li> <li> Slide 20 </li> <li> The three most important methods of improving indoor air quality are source removal (cleaning floor, using a dehumidifier, cutting down on synthetic fragrances, having hard floors instead of carpet, no candles/fireplaces) air cleaning (keeping indoor plantsex. Devils Ivy and Peace Lily, using an air purifier, checking and replacing air filters) increased ventilation (opening windows). </li> <li> Slide 21 </li> <li> Slide 22 </li> <li> EXPOSURE FACTS Around 3 billion people cook and heat their homes using open fires and leaky stoves burning biomass (wood, animal dung and crop waste) and coal. Nearly 2 million people die prematurely from illness attributable to indoor air pollution from household solid fuel use. </li> <li> Slide 23 </li> <li> Slide 24 </li> <li> More than 1 million people a year die from chronic obstructive respiratory disease (COPD) that develops due to exposure to indoor air pollution. Both women and men exposed to heavy indoor smoke are 2-3 times more likely to develop COPD. </li> </ul>