1 Connecticut Fire Academy Officer’s Role In Driver Safety Connecticut Fire Academy Officer’s Role in Driver Safety Connecticut Fire Academy Officer’s

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<ul><li> Slide 1 </li> <li> 1 Connecticut Fire Academy Officers Role In Driver Safety Connecticut Fire Academy Officers Role in Driver Safety Connecticut Fire Academy Officers Role in Driver Safety </li> <li> Slide 2 </li> <li> 2 Connecticut Fire Academy Officers Role in Driver Safety Connecticut Fire Academy Officers Role in Driver Safety </li> <li> Slide 3 </li> <li> Slide 4 </li> <li> Slide 5 </li> <li> Connecticut Fire Academy Officers Role in Driver Safety 5 Course Objectives To provide guidance to fire department comp- any and staff officers for developing &amp; maint- aining support for the safe operation of all fire and emergency vehicles and / or any other vehicles operated by the fire department and / or its members while in the performance of their duties </li> <li> Slide 6 </li> <li> Connecticut Fire Academy Officers Role in Driver Safety 6 Including: Fire apparatusFire apparatus Rescue vehiclesRescue vehicles AmbulancesAmbulances Command vehiclesCommand vehicles Support vehiclesSupport vehicles Any other vehicles owned by the dept.Any other vehicles owned by the dept. POVsPOVs </li> <li> Slide 7 </li> <li> Connecticut Fire Academy Officers Role in Driver Safety 7 Topics Basic Driving Policies: Driver qualifications and training Driver qualifications and training Skills maintenance Skills maintenance Duties and responsibilities Duties and responsibilities Risk Management Risk Management General traffic laws General traffic laws Reporting safety problems &amp; violations Reporting safety problems &amp; violations </li> <li> Slide 8 </li> <li> Connecticut Fire Academy Officers Role in Driver Safety 8 Topics Emergency Response Policies: Authorized emergency response Authorized emergency response Special driver qualifications Special driver qualifications Applicable traffic laws Applicable traffic laws Fire Department driving policies Fire Department driving policies Use of warning devices Use of warning devices Member behavior while riding apparatus Member behavior while riding apparatus </li> <li> Slide 9 </li> <li> Connecticut Fire Academy Officers Role in Driver Safety 9 Topics Liability Issues: Negligent hiring Negligent hiring Negligent retention Negligent retention Lack of training Lack of training Improper training Improper training </li> <li> Slide 10 </li> <li> Connecticut Fire Academy Officers Role in Driver Safety 10 Topics Vehicle Accident Reporting &amp; Investigation: Accident scene procedures Accident scene procedures Accident Investigation Accident Investigation Report preparation &amp; publication Report preparation &amp; publication </li> <li> Slide 11 </li> <li> 11 Abstract Collision incidents involving the operation of all types of fire apparatus continue to rise each year. Such incidents continue to be a leading cause of firefighter deaths and injuries throughout the country. </li> <li> Slide 12 </li> <li> 12 The second leading cause of death and injury for Fire personnel is blunt force trauma due to vehicle crashes </li> <li> Slide 13 </li> <li> 13 The leading cause of death and injury for EMS personnel is blunt force trauma due to vehicle crashes </li> <li> Slide 14 </li> <li> 14 Myths v. Facts Myth #1: emergency vehicle accidents occur in bad weather with poor visibility Fact #1: The majority of emergency vehicle accidents occur on clear days with good visibility </li> <li> Slide 15 </li> <li> 15 Myths v. Facts Myth #2: Most emergency vehicle accidents occur on dark roads or at dusk when the driver has diffi- culty seeing other vehicles. Fact #2: The majority of emergency vehicle acci- dents occur in daylight. </li> <li> Slide 16 </li> <li> 16 Myths v. Facts Myth #3: Most emergency vehicle accidents occur when trying to pass a vehicle that refuses to yield to the right of the road. Fact #3: The majority of emergency vehicle accidents occur when making turns or when broadsided at an intersection. </li> <li> Slide 17 </li> <li> 17 Myths v. Facts Myth #4: Most emergency vehicle accidents occur on wet or snowy roads. Fact #4: The majority of emergency vehicle accidents occur on dry roads. </li> <li> Slide 18 </li> <li> 18 Myths v. Facts Myth #5: Most emergency vehicle accidents occur while backing the vehicle into a tight spot. Fact #5: As in Fact #3, the majority of emergency vehicle accidents occur on the roadway in an intersection. </li> <li> Slide 19 </li> <li> 19 Myths v. Facts Myth #6: Because emergency vehicles have lights and sirens, the traffic signal device does not present the emergency vehicle driver with a major hazard. Fact #6: Locations where traffic signaling devices exist present the greatest risk for an emergency vehicle accident to occur. </li> <li> Slide 20 </li> <li> 20 Where is the problem? So if the weather, time of day, the other drivers, location of crashes and all the things we mentioned are myths, then where is the problem? Keep this question in mind as we go forward in this presentation </li> <li> Slide 21 </li> <li> 21 Abstract In 2007 115 firefighters were killed in the Line of Duty. There were 26 vehicle collisions and 3 struck by incidents that took the lives of 29 firefighters. </li> <li> Slide 22 </li> <li> 22 USFA Releases Provisional 2007 Firefighter Fatality Statistics Speed and a lack of seat belts contributed to many deaths as well. More than 2 of every 10 firefighter fatalities in 2007 occurred when responding to or returning from an incident. While seat belts and speed were not necessarily factors in all of these fatalities, they were contributing factors for most of them. USFA Releases Provisional 2007 Firefighter Fatality Statistics Speed and a lack of seat belts contributed to many deaths as well. More than 2 of every 10 firefighter fatalities in 2007 occurred when responding to or returning from an incident. While seat belts and speed were not necessarily factors in all of these fatalities, they were contributing factors for most of them. </li> <li> Slide 23 </li> <li> 23 Abstract All told, 22.6% of the firefighters killed in the line of duty last year were killed in vehicle crashes or traffic related incidents Apparatus crashes or other traffic related incidents continue to be the second leading cause of death for firefighters </li> <li> Slide 24 </li> <li> 24 Abstract Of the 29 firefighters were killed in traffic related incidents: 24 Were killed while responding 24 Were killed while responding 2 were killed while returning 2 were killed while returning 3 Were killed in other traffic related incidents such as struck by a vehicle 3 Were killed in other traffic related incidents such as struck by a vehicle </li> <li> Slide 25 </li> <li> 25 Abstract To the end of January 2008 30% of the firefighters deaths in this country are from vehicle or traffic related incidents. 2008 is no better than last year In fact, it is worse: 2008 is no better than last year In fact, it is worse: Whereas only 10% of the deaths so far have been during active fireground activities </li> <li> Slide 26 </li> <li> 26 Abstract Our first firefighter fatality of 2008 occurred on New Years Day when a volunteer Firefighter from North Carolina was killed in a crash while responding to a fire </li> <li> Slide 27 </li> <li> 27 Abstract </li> <li> Slide 28 </li> <li> 28 Abstract </li> <li> Slide 29 </li> <li> 29 Abstract He was heading north on Old Concord Road when he took a curve too fast about 3 miles south of China Grove, said N.C. Highway Patrol Trooper C.F. Rogers. He lost control of his pickup, overturned and was thrown from the truck. He wasn't wearing a seatbelt. Rogers estimated that Arthur was going at least 75 miles per hour. The speed limit is 55, and a sign recommends 40 for the curve. Cold Water Fire Chief James Preddy Jr. said police give volunteer firefighters leeway when they turn their emergency lights on, but they're not allowed to speed. This young man died in his own fatal car crash while responding to a car crash! </li> <li> Slide 30 </li> <li> 30 Abstract </li> <li> Slide 31 </li> <li> 31 Abstract The fire service community needs to take a more active roll in understanding the causes of such incidents. Such as: </li> <li> Slide 32 </li> <li> 32 It wasnt the driver that was killed in this crash The officer was not wearing his seat belt and was ejected and thrown into a bridge abutment </li> <li> Slide 33 </li> <li> 33 </li> <li> Slide 34 </li> <li> 34 Chief Officers are not exempt from disaster either </li> <li> Slide 35 </li> <li> 35 This is a single vehicle EMS crash caused by loss of control due to excessive speed The driver survived but his partner and the patient were both killed </li> <li> Slide 36 </li> <li> 36 In this case from Arkansas the patient in the emergency vehicle was the victim of a gunshot wound to the chest. The patient died due to the delay in getting him to the hospital because of this crash. </li> <li> Slide 37 </li> <li> Connecticut Fire Academy Basic EVOC Connecticut Fire Academy Basic EVOC 37 </li> <li> Slide 38 </li> <li> Connecticut Fire Academy Basic EVOC Connecticut Fire Academy Basic EVOC 38 How do you get run over by your own fire truck? </li> <li> Slide 39 </li> <li> 39 How do you crushed to death by your own fire truck? Long Island Firefighter Crushed to Death </li> <li> Slide 40 </li> <li> 40 How do you crushed by your own fire truck in your own firehouse? Fire Captain Crushed Between Apparatus </li> <li> Slide 41 </li> <li> 41 The score in this crash: Freight Train: 1 Fire Department: 0 </li> <li> Slide 42 </li> <li> 42 You cant make this stuff up. We do it to ourselves all the time!!!! Take A Good Look At This Picture </li> <li> Slide 43 </li> <li> Connecticut Fire Academy Officers Role in Driver Safety 43 Hurry up, we can beat the other company to the box! </li> <li> Slide 44 </li> <li> Connecticut Fire Academy Officers Role in Driver Safety 44 Hurry up, we can beat the other company to the box! </li> <li> Slide 45 </li> <li> Connecticut Fire Academy Officers Role in Driver Safety 45 Hurry up, we can beat the other company to the box! </li> <li> Slide 46 </li> <li> Connecticut Fire Academy Officers Role in Driver Safety 46 Hurry up, we can beat the other company to the box! </li> <li> Slide 47 </li> <li> Connecticut Fire Academy Officers Role in Driver Safety 47 Failed to stop at a controlled intersection </li> <li> Slide 48 </li> <li> Connecticut Fire Academy Officers Role in Driver Safety 48 And killed a bus driver </li> <li> Slide 49 </li> <li> Connecticut Fire Academy Officers Role in Driver Safety 49 Whos fault is this disaster? </li> <li> Slide 50 </li> <li> Connecticut Fire Academy Officers Role in Driver Safety 50 And what about this one? Waterbury, May 2007 </li> <li> Slide 51 </li> <li> Connecticut Fire Academy Officers Role in Driver Safety 51 Or an even worse nightmare: </li> <li> Slide 52 </li> <li> Connecticut Fire Academy Officers Role in Driver Safety 52 </li> <li> Slide 53 </li> <li> Connecticut Fire Academy Officers Role in Driver Safety 53 In each of the cases you have just seen a Company Officer was riding in each piece of apparatus In two of the cases it was the officer who was killed. </li> <li> Slide 54 </li> <li> Connecticut Fire Academy Officers Role in Driver Safety 54 To address the problem we must change the cultureTo address the problem we must change the culture Changing the culture is hard workChanging the culture is hard work </li> <li> Slide 55 </li> <li> Connecticut Fire Academy Officers Role in Driver Safety 55 Both the Officer and Chauffeur driving this rig were seriously injured in this crash 150 years of great tradition Totally unimpeded by progress </li> <li> Slide 56 </li> <li> Connecticut Fire Academy Officers Role in Driver Safety 56 Changing the culture is hard work Ive been drivin dis rig for thirty years, I can stop on a dime!!! er, it wasnt me, it was dem brakes!!! </li> <li> Slide 57 </li> <li> Connecticut Fire Academy Officers Role in Driver Safety 57 Changing the culture is hard work The less time I spend in the intersection, the less chance I have of gettin hit so I aint stoppin! Aw S____t!! Civilian killed and an $800,000. piece of apparatus out of service for several months </li> <li> Slide 58 </li> <li> Connecticut Fire Academy Officers Role in Driver Safety 58 Changing the culture is hard work Lookit here, if I dont go fast I wont be first to da box!!!!! </li> <li> Slide 59 </li> <li> Connecticut Fire Academy Officers Role in Driver Safety 59 The Accident Waiting to Happen OK, everybody in?, grab yer whatevers and hold on. Hang on guys, Trust me, Ive been doin dis for thirty yearswe aint gonna be second to dis call !! </li> <li> Slide 60 </li> <li> Connecticut Fire Academy Officers Role in Driver Safety 60 The fact is that the majority of crashes occur due to human error and of that human error it is that is the biggest problem </li> <li> Slide 61 </li> <li> Connecticut Fire Academy Officers Role in Driver Safety 61 Driver Attitude </li> <li> Slide 62 </li> <li> Connecticut Fire Academy Officers Role in Driver Safety 62 Driver Attitude </li> <li> Slide 63 </li> <li> Connecticut Fire Academy Officers Role in Driver Safety 63 Officers Role Who sets the tone for the drivers attitude? </li> <li> Slide 64 </li> <li> Connecticut Fire Academy Officers Role in Driver Safety 64 Driver Training &amp; Responsibilities Personal Qualities &amp; Attributes Needed In Emergency Vehicle Operators </li> <li> Slide 65 </li> <li> Connecticut Fire Academy Officers Role in Driver Safety 65 DRIVER RESPONSIBILITIES The driver of the emergency vehicle carries a heavy responsibilities for the safety of his / her company members, the public and the vehicle. The driver of the emergency vehicle carries a heavy responsibilities for the safety of his / her company members, the public and the vehicle. The driver must be familiar with the Motor Vehicle Statutes especially those that deal with emergency response. The driver must be familiar with the Motor Vehicle Statutes especially those that deal with emergency response. The driver of the emergency vehicle carries a heavy responsibilities for the safety of his / her company members, the public and the vehicle. The driver of the emergency vehicle carries a heavy responsibilities for the safety of his / her company members, the public and the vehicle. The driver must be familiar with the Motor Vehicle Statutes especially those that deal with emergency response. The driver must be familiar with the Motor Vehicle Statutes especially those that deal with emergency response. </li> <li> Slide 66 </li> <li> Connecticut Fire Academy Officers Role in Driver Safety 66 OFFICER RESPONSIBILITIES Know the drivers job and everything the driver is supposed to know Know the drivers job and everything the driver is supposed to knowPlus: Properly supervise the driver Properly supervise the driver Properly communicate with the driver Properly communicate with the driver Know the drivers job and everything the driver is supposed to know Know the drivers job and everything the driver is supposed to knowPlus: Properly supervise the driver Properly su...</li></ul>