Zachary J Topp Architectural Portfolio 2016

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<ul><li><p>Zachary J. ToppArchitectural Portfolio</p></li><li><p>Ryerson University, TorontoGraduating in 2016</p><p>Bachelor Degree in Architectural ScienceMajoring in Building Science</p><p>Summary of Qualifications: Resourceful, Dependable, Creative, Quick Learner, Organized</p><p>Detail oriented, Dedicated, Able to work independently or with a teamFamiliar with the Ontario Building Code and Supplementary Standards SB-10 and SB-12</p><p>Comfortable with Metric and Imperial units</p><p>Proficient in:Sketching, Drafting and Model Construction</p><p>AutoCAD, Revit, Rhinoceros3D, V-ray, Hot2000, Therm7.4, Window 7.4</p><p>Photoshop, InDesign, Excel and Word</p><p>Architectural Work Experience: </p><p>Performance Dairy Centre 2013-2014Draftsman and Maintenance Labourer, Summers 2013, 2014</p><p>Drafted drawings of milking parlours, sort gates, stabling and grain bins. Performed site visits, installations, meeting with clients. </p><p>Schematic design in AutoCad.Design in Revit as well as, making custom families.</p><p>Zachary J. Topp 435495 43rd Line </p><p>R.R. # 2, Embro,ON N0J 1J0</p><p>M: 226-883-1441zacjtopp@gmail.com</p></li><li><p>Studio Projects</p><p>1st year ASC101: Writers studio ..................................................................................................4-9</p><p>2nd year ASC 301: Mapping Centre .........................................................................................10-17</p><p>3rd year ASC520: Kortright Centre ..........................................................................................18-23</p><p>3rd year ASC520: Little Portugal Library ................................................................................24-31</p><p>3rd year ASC620: Library Detail Study ................................................................................... 32-39</p><p>3rd year ASC621: Detail Reconstruction .................................................................................40-43</p><p>Technical Projects</p><p>Energy Modeling........................................................................................................................46-47</p><p>Heat Transfer Modeling.............................................................................................................48-49</p><p>Construction Drawings..............................................................................................................50-51</p></li><li><p>This was an early project situated on the premise of the Spadina house. The writers studio was a 15 m2 structure that would serve as a visiting writers place of work for part of the year. The concept is a solid box, with a portion of a facade pulled out, revealing transparent glazing. The solid box housed the utilities and bed, while the transparent portion provided inspiring views for the writer. Two desks en-sure ample work space and changes of scenery if needed, as one faces the open yard, and the other faces the garden.</p><p>Clerestory windows insured ample cross ventilation in the summer, being gentle enough that it would not blow papers off the desk. A wood burning stove ensured there was enough heat in the winter for the writer to stay comfortable. The green and white palette of the cladding refers back to the aesthetics of the Spadina house itself. </p></li><li><p>Left: View from the studioRight: Exterior render</p></li><li><p>Located to the north of Torontos City Hall, The Centre for Cartography is a museum for the historic and modern practices of mapping, as well as being a place of research and educa-tion. The buildings form took on the shape of two boxes with a perimeter ambulatory. One box was services and the other was a double height multi-purposed room with an auditorium in the basement. The ambulatory provided a place for the display of many historical maps and antique mapping equipment. The second floor was dedi-cated to research offices and the display of mod-ern mapping techniques. Windows were located for the offices, but care was taken to prevent di-rect UV light from damaging the maps on display. The faade was clad with brick to give homage to the location of the building in the downtown. A dialogue between grey and yellow bricks with the rectilinear windows evokes the dialogue between Concession Acts and the natural features of the land they divided; the laying of a grid over the natural topography of Southern Ontario, a point of interest in Canadian cartography.</p></li><li><p>The Kortright Centre for Conservation is a leader in educating and displaying sustainable design strategies. The Visitors Centre embraces those values and incorporates many environmentally friendly features. The monitor shed roof is slopped at 70 degrees from vertical, the most efficient for year round solar power col-lection. Rain gutters are provided to collect rainwater for use in the building. For thermal efficiency the west and north walls have limited glazing; the south having the majority. The solar gain of the southern glazing is controlled by roof overhang and horizontal louvers to limit it in summer and permit it in the winter. Opera-ble windows are provided to encourage use of cross ventilation during the summer months. Double height spaces and interior gardens provide pleasent interior spaces for many people to converge in.</p></li><li><p>Located on Dundas St. West, this building needed to have three separate programs. To accommodate the entrances, operating hours and security measures for each, the ground floor was opened up to lobby space. The lobby provides clear views and presence of the library, community centre, and CSI (Centre for Social Innovation) office. The programs are arranged formally, with the library portion occupying floors two and three, and office on floors four and five. Different elevators serve each section for security purposes. The Community Centre portion is located to the north, with easy ground access from the lobby during any hours. Each portion is clad in a different material, reading easily from the exterior. A central atrium links the spaces together, and allows daylight to penetrate deep into the building. </p></li><li><p>Brick was chosen to clad the library. It was used because of its ability to be read as a seam-less material, making the mass of the library read as one single expression of rhythmically punched windows. Parapets were brought up to 1.2 metre height to eliminate any railings, thus keeping true to the pure formal masses. Curtain wall glazing was used to clad the office to allow light to penetrate the building, and to create good, healthy, and desirable working conditions. Stone panels were used on the community centre portion to install a sense of permanence and because of their contrast to the other materials present.</p></li><li><p>A portion of the library was chosen for further design development. The North West corner was chosen as it displayed the largest vari-eties of conditions. Open space, library, office and the community centre all converged in one portion. Constructability was looked at, with beams and drop slabs being worked in, and decisions being made about which parts of the cores are poured concrete and which are concrete block. Details of the exterior walls were made. The community portion is made of stone panels with a proprietary rail and fastener system on a concrete block backup wall. The library is constructed of Flemish bond brick veneer of a concrete block back up wall. The library has a reading room spill out on the roof of the community. A spe-cial aesthetic is created for this unique space. Here the headers in the Flemish bond are omitted and the brick functions as a screen. Stainless steel wind posts deal with structural loads and a glazing system deals with enve-lope conditions. The glazing is all operable in order to facilitate easy cleaning.</p></li><li><p>23</p><p>1</p></li><li><p>Detail 1</p></li><li><p>Detail 2</p></li><li><p>Detail 3</p></li><li><p>Detail 4</p><p>4</p><p>5</p></li><li><p>Detail 5</p></li><li><p>This project focused on materials and tectonics. Steel was selected and researched with a case study of a Canadian building that used steel for a key feature. The pod structure in Leslie Dan Pharmacy Building by Fosters and Partners with Moffat and Kinoshita was chosen to be studied. I looked at how the steel frame of curved round HSS tubes was constructed. It was fabricated in sections with bolted connections to facilitate easy transportation. Small portions of angle iron were also welded to the frame to provide a place for the sub frame of steel studs. Diagonal bracing strengthened the frame and helped bring loads to connection points. </p><p>Using Rhinoceros3D, a simple reconstruction was made using plans and sections as reference. The model was scaled by 1:4 due to construc-tion limitations. Using a pipe bender, grinder, drill press, and arc welder, the frame was assembled.</p></li><li><p>010000</p><p>20000</p><p>30000</p><p>40000</p><p>50000</p><p>60000</p><p>Actualconsumption BaseHot2000Simulation</p><p>SB12CompliantRenovations</p><p>SB12RenovationwithGSHP</p><p>Total</p><p>Energ</p><p>y(kW</p><p>h)</p><p>EnergyConsumtionComparison</p><p>Component</p><p>ValueRequiredbySB12</p><p>Currentvalue1869</p><p>Currentvalue1900</p><p>Newvalue1869</p><p>Newvalue1900</p><p>Ceilingwithatticspacemin.RSI</p><p>8.81</p><p>Ceilingwithoutatticspacemin.RSI 5.46</p><p>WallsAboveGrademin.RSI 4.23 1.61 2.87 4.60 4.82</p><p>Basementwallsmin.RSI 3.52 0.89 0.89 3.52 3.52&gt;600mmBelowGradeslab</p><p>entiresurfaceMin.RSI 0.88 0.19 n/a 0.88 n/a</p></li><li><p>BSC 720 Project 3, part B Zac Topp 2015 </p><p>10 </p><p>Photo 3 Arial view of property overlaid with a diagram of 450m of heat loopThe total energy consumption of the house with extra insulation and a ground source </p><p>heat pump brings the energy requirements down to 20037 kWh per annum. This is 36% </p><p>lower than the consumption of the house at 25% WWR and SB-12 compliant. This is </p><p>also a 65% reduction from the original Hot2000 simulation. The energy consumption of </p><p>the SB-12+ GSHP house can also be written as 72.1 GJ per annum. By dividing this </p><p>over the houses area of 232metres, we find the energy level is at 0.31 GJ/Metre/year, </p><p>we can compare this to the 2030 challenge. The house now meets the 60% of the 2030 </p><p>Challenge Site EUI Targets for Ontario detached homes. </p><p>0</p><p>10000</p><p>20000</p><p>30000</p><p>40000</p><p>50000</p><p>60000</p><p>Actualconsumption BaseHot2000Simulation</p><p>SB12CompliantRenovations</p><p>SB12RenovationwithGSHP</p><p>Total</p><p>Energ</p><p>y(kW</p><p>h)</p><p>EnergyConsumtionComparisonBSC 720 Project 3, part B </p><p>Zac Topp 2015 </p><p>9 </p><p>There is still several ways energy can be reduced further. A target of 20% further energy reduction was chosen. Insulating the faade more, lowers consumption. Thewalls loose the most heat as they make up the most building area. By insulating the walls and the vented attic ceiling the energy consumption can be lowered. The mineral wool insulation in the stud walls was increased from 102mm (4) to 153mm (6). The brick walls have another layer of 50mm (2) Polyisocyanurate insulation added. The vented attic ceiling has an additional 153mm (6) of blow in cellulose insulation added. The increase in R values is shown below in table 3.</p><p>Table 3</p><p>SB-12 compliant RSI </p><p>New value </p><p>RSI Ceiling with attic space min. RSI 9.06 12.1 </p><p>Brick Walls Above Grade min. RSI 4.6 6.91 </p><p>Stud Walls Above Grade min. RSI 4.82 6.86 </p><p>The increase in these R values brings the energy consumption down from 33129 kWh to 31471kWh. The savings is only 1658 kWh, or about 5%. Increasing the RSI values is not very feasibly as the relationship between the RSI value and energy saved is anasymptotic relationship, as you add more insulation, it makes less of an effect. Other methods are needed. </p><p>Another strategy is renewable energy sources. The best option is a ground source heat pump. A ground source heat pump works by pumping glycol through underground tubes. The tubes collect low grade heat, that is then concentrated as high grade heat via a refrigerant cycle. This heat can then be distributed through the houses Central air system. The most economical system is a horizontal loop system. The loopsare placed in trenches 3 to 6 feet deep. In this case, 6 feet deep should be used as it is most efficient. The horizontal loop takes up a lot of space. The house at 435495 43rdline is located at the centre of 110 acres. There is more land available then what is needed.</p><p>A large residential ground source heat pump system was sized. The total capacity is 3 ton or 10.5kW (36000 btu/h). This capacity requires approximately 450 metres of underground tubing. This tubing easily fits on the property, refer to photo 3.</p><p>Examples of report pages</p></li><li><p>Heat Transfer Modeling </p><p>Therm 7.4 Analysis</p><p>Therm is a program that can accurately model two dimensional heat flow through building components. It can be used to model any type or size of com-ponent from entire wall details to individual elements. The program allows you to find the U values of entire assemblies and helps determine the biggest ther-mal breaks. In the example below a section of passive house wall is shown. On the adjacent page an example of a standard thermally broke aluminum mullion with two pane IGUs is shown.</p></li><li><p>@@</p><p>@</p><p>Construction Documents</p><p>In groups of six students, a studio project was chosen for further design. The building was taken to design development and construction drawings were produced. Research was done into proper standards for construction drawings. A con-sistent format was developed and used throughout the group. Feedback was given at 25%, 50% 75% and 100% design development, creating an iterative process. The washroom details and second floor page are examples of my portion.</p></li><li><p>Zachary J. Topp 435495 43rd Line R.R. # 2, Embro,ON N0J 1J0 M: 226-883-1441 zacjtopp@gmail.com</p></li></ul>