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<ul><li><p>University of Pennsylvania University Laboratory Animal Resources (ULAR) </p><p>Information on power-related outages </p><p> The University of Pennsylvania is required under its Assurance of Compliance with PHS Policy on Humane Care and Use of laboratory Animals by Awardee Institutions (No. A3079-01); and under its conditions of accreditation by the Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animals, International (AAALAC) to prepare a disaster plan that takes into account both animals and personnel in the animal facility. In addition, a disaster plan is a requirement of the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals (NRC, 2011). </p><p> Power and Lighting [Guide, p. 141] </p><p> a. Note if emergency power is provided for the animal facility and if so, what </p><p>electrical services and equipment are maintained in the event the primary power source fails. </p><p> Vivarial emergency power provides emergency levels of lighting and exhaust. In most vivaria, ventilation and cooling is maintained at a reduced, life-sustaining level. All campus buildings are supported by dual substations. This dual supply yields redundant electrical power sources. Penn Facilities and Real Estate Systems (FRES) follows a set schedule for run-testing back-up generators to ensure they are operationally ready if needed. BRB: Emergency power is provided by 2 standby diesel engine-generator sets. Emergency power feeds life safety equipment, air handlers, chilled water and heating and ventilation systems. CRB: 2 diesel generators provide emergency power. Emergency power feeds life safety equipment, Air Handlers 6 and 9, exhaust fans 1 4, and chilled water. Hill vivarium: Emergency power is provided and supports emergency levels of lighting, exhaust and life-sustaining levels of cooling for the vivarium. JM3: Air handler unit An emergency DX system reduces supply air to required survival requirements, if necessary. Emergency power is provided by a diesel powered emergency generator, which feeds life safety, DX AHU, exhaust fans and tower pumps. Lynch Vivarium: Dual primary electric feeds from remote PECO substations feed double-ended primary switchgear with redundant transformers with instantaneous tie/automatic transfer on both primary </p></li><li><p>University of Pennsylvania University Laboratory Animal Resources (ULAR) </p><p>Information on power-related outages </p><p>and secondary sides. There is a single 700 KWA diesel-powered generator on the penthouse level fed from a day tank on the same level fed in turn from a Basement/Loading Dock level storage tank, the fuel pumps are served by emergency power. This back-up power supplies a variety of functions for the building. SAIF (Basement, John Morgan): a diesel powered emergency generator provides Emergency power. Stemmler 5th floor: Emergency power is provided by a dedicated diesel engine generator supporting emergency levels of lighting, exhaust and life-sustaining supply fan operation and a supplemental chiller capable of supporting the vivarium under all conditions. Emergency power feeds life safety equipment, AHU-1 and EAHU1, exhaust fan 74 servicing room 327. TRL: Emergency power to the vivarium is provide by a dedicated, natural gas feed generator. Systems served by this system include: life safety equipment, dedicated SAHU and EFU equipment, a dedicated chiller, and a hot water reheat system. SCTR 1st floor, 6th floor, and 7th floor: Emergency power is provided by 2 standby diesel engine-generator sets. Emergency power provides life support levels for life safety equipment, Air Handlers, chilled water and heating and ventilation systems. </p><p> b. Give history of power failures for the animal facility. Note frequency and </p><p>duration. If emergency power was not available during a power failure, describe steps taken to ensure the comfort and well-being of the animals and the temperature extremes reached in the animal rooms during the failure. At our newest vivarium, Smilow Center, there were 2 power failures since the building was opened. 1. On May 23, 2013 at about 10:45 am one of the two 13.2 KV PECO </p><p>(Philadelphia Electric Company), service entrances experienced a failure. The full building load was automatically transferred to the other PECO service entrance. The emergency generators automatically started and powered the vivarium equipment as designed, environmental conditions were maintained. Normal building conditions were restored by about 12:30 pm. The problem was later identified as under sized metering equipment, supplied by PECO. Later in the day, at about 3:00 pm the alternate PECO line failed with no secondary line to transfer to. Again the emergency </p></li><li><p>University of Pennsylvania University Laboratory Animal Resources (ULAR) </p><p>Information on power-related outages </p><p>generators automatically started and powered the vivarium as designed, and environmental conditions were maintained. Power was on and off over a 12 hour period. The environment and animals were closely monitored during this outage, but hospital and vivarial areas were affected. Water was supplied to large animals by staff using carboys filled from the reverse osmosis tank when needed. Room temperatures stayed within Guide levels and there were no adverse consequences for animals. After this power failure, an exhaustive investigation was performed, it was concluded that the root cause was that PECO supplied undersized metering equipment when the building was built. The failures resulted with an increase in load when the building was fully occupied. New properly sized metering equipment was replaced by PECO. </p><p> 2. On June 1, 2013 at about 9:30 am the mechanical substation </p><p>located on the fifth floor of TRC experienced a failure due to the opening of a 13.2 KV fuse. The mechanical load was transferred to the alternate feeder. The emergency generators automatically started and powered the vivarium equipment as designed, environmental conditions were maintained. The high voltage fuse was replaced, the assembly serviced, and normal operating power was restored. On June 8, 2013 at about 4:15 pm the same mechanical substation located on the fifth floor of TRC experienced a failure due to the opening of a 13.2 KV fuse, on this occasion it was the other/alternate power source. Again, the emergency generators automatically started and powered the vivarium equipment as designed, environmental conditions were maintained. Normal power restored to mechanical equipment at about 7:40 pm. It was concluded that there was a manufacturing defect in the fabrication of the high voltage fuses, and the failures resulted with an increase in load when the building was fully occupied. All fuses were replaced with new ones supplied by the manufacturer. </p><p> We have also experienced one additional power failure. In the CRB on September 6, 2014 at about 12:15 pm line 5-12, a University 13.2 KV power line feeding parts of Blockley Hall, CRB, Fagen Hall and the Cyclotron failed. The emergency generators automatically started and powered the building systems, there was difficulty restarting the equipment, environmental conditions were maintained. The problem was isolated to failed insulation in the Substation E switchboard which resulted in a phase to ground fault, full power to the affected building was restored by 5:00 pm. A thorough investigation and analysis was conducted, recommendations were developed, and an action plan was </p></li><li><p>University of Pennsylvania University Laboratory Animal Resources (ULAR) </p><p>Information on power-related outages </p><p>implemented. A planed outage occurred on the evening of November 5, 2014 to perform the required maintenance, all preparations necessary for continued vivarium operations were set in place, and the operation was successful. The duration of this power outage was approximately 4 hours. Only rodents are housed in these vivaria and most of these rodents are housed in static isolation cages with water bottles, except for the BRB vivarium. The environment and animals were closely monitored during this outage. Animals had adequate water and room conditions remained within Guide recommendations for the species. There were no adverse consequences for animals. </p><p> c. Describe lighting system(s) for the animal housing facility(ies). For each </p><p>species or holding room type, list light intensity, photoperiod (Light:Dark), construction features (e.g., water resistance), and control (e.g., automatic versus manual, phasing). For systems automatically controlling photoperiod, describe override mechanisms. </p><p> Light intensity is not routinely measured; however as a sequel to an OLAW visit in February 2012, a ULAR employee measured light levels in 4 major vivarial locations at a total of over 50 locations in animal rooms and found that light levels in these locations were acceptable for animal housing. Data was submitted to OLAW and, as documented in post-inspection correspondence, OLAW concurred that our light levels were acceptable. All vivarial lighting is provided using light fixtures with water-resistant covers over fluorescent bulbs. Lighting is automatically controlled to provide the photoperiod listed below. Graduated phasing from full light through dawn or sunset is not utilized. The table below summarizes the lighting criteria by vivarium. </p><p>Vivarium Name </p><p>Hours Light: Hours Dark </p><p> Light Control (Automatic vs Manual) </p><p> Description of lighting </p><p>override mechanism/s </p><p>BRB II-III 12/12 7am-7pm Automatic Manual override utilizing a 1 hour spring-loaded timer </p><p>outside of room CRB 12/12 7am-7pm Automatic Manual override utilizing a </p><p>1 hour spring-loaded timer outside of room </p><p>Hill 12/12 -7am-7pm Automatic JM SAIF 12/12 7am-7pm Automatic Through OCC </p></li><li><p>University of Pennsylvania University Laboratory Animal Resources (ULAR) </p><p>Information on power-related outages </p><p>John Morgan 3rd </p><p>12/12-7am-7pm Automatic Manual timer with red light outside of rooms </p><p>Lynch 12/12 7am-7pm Automatic Manual override utilizing a 1 hour spring-loaded timer </p><p>outside of room Smilow TRC </p><p> 6th and 7th floors 12/12 7am-7pm Automatic Manual override utilizing a </p><p>1 hour spring-loaded timer outside of room </p><p>Stemmer 5th 12/12 7am-7pm Automatic Manual override utilizing a 1 hour spring-loaded timer </p><p>outside of room TRL 12/12 6am-6pm Manual Manual override utilizing a </p><p>1 hour spring-loaded timer outside of room </p><p> 3. System Malfunctions. If not previously reported, describe animal losses or health </p><p>problems resulting from power, HVAC, or other life support system (e.g., individually ventilated cages) failures, and mechanisms for reporting such incidences. AAALAC International Rules of Accreditation (Section 2.f) </p><p> In the Smilow 1st and 6th floor animal housing and behavioral study areas, lighting failed to turn off automatically for periods during 2013. On the first floor, for a duration of 2 weeks, this problem was caused by an investigator interfering with the lighting override in the evenings, leaving the room in on mode. This problem was reported to ULAR by a researcher who saw the lights on when working late. This area is not used for breeding, but investigators experimental studies were compromised. On the 6th floor an incorrect computer update to the Siemens building control system caused the lights to stay on continuously for at least a week. This problem was related to the widespread electrical failure in the Smilow building described above. This area is not used for breeding, but behavioral studies were compromised. The problem was reported by an investigator who noticed problems with her studies and reported the problems to ULAR, who then investigated and reported to facilities management. </p><p>http://www.aaalac.org/accreditation/rules.cfm</p><p>Power and Lighting [UGuideU, p. 141]a. Note if emergency power is provided for the animal facility and if so, what electrical services and equipment are maintained in the event the primary power source fails.b. Give history of power failures for the animal facility. Note frequency and duration. If emergency power was not available during a power failure, describe steps taken to ensure the comfort and well-being of the animals and the temperature extreme...c. Describe lighting system(s) for the animal housing facility(ies). For each species or holding room type, list light intensity, photoperiod (Light:Dark), construction features (e.g., water resistance), and control (e.g., automatic versus manual, ph...</p><p>3. System Malfunctions. If not previously reported, describe animal losses or health problems resulting from power, HVAC, or other life support system (e.g., individually ventilated cages) failures, and mechanisms for reporting such incidences. 30TU...</p></li></ul>

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