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<ul><li><p>Survey ofUK Construction Professional Services</p><p>Methodology</p><p>2005/06</p><p>This survey was led and project managed by:</p><p>Construction Industry Council (CIC), CIC is a partner in ConstructionSkills</p><p>And jointly undertaken by:</p><p>Davis Langdon Management Consulting and Experian BS</p><p> SURVEY METHOLOGY 23/11/07 16:22 Page 1</p></li><li><p>This research was funded by ConstructionSkills, the Sector Skills Council for Construction, </p><p>and carried out by the Construction Industry Council (CIC) as lead partner.</p></li><li><p>Professional Services Statistics Part 2 Methodology</p><p>Davis Langdon Management Consulting May 2007</p><p> 1 Introduction................................................................................. 1 1.1 Scope of the report ....................................................................... 1 1.2 Arrangements ............................................................................... 1 1.3 Scope of the study and definitions used in the survey................... 2</p><p>2 The consultation process........................................................... 5 2.1 Key features.................................................................................. 5 2.2 Overview....................................................................................... 5 2.3 Consultation with professional institutions and members of CIC ... 5</p><p>3 Development of the survey questionnaire ................................ 7 3.1 Key features.................................................................................. 7 3.2 Overview....................................................................................... 7 3.3 The pilot process........................................................................... 7</p><p>4 Survey sample and stratification ............................................... 9 4.1 Key features.................................................................................. 9 4.2 Overview....................................................................................... 9 4.3 Development of the sampling frame.............................................. 9</p><p>5 The administration of the survey............................................. 12 5.1 Key features................................................................................ 12 5.2 Overview..................................................................................... 12 5.3 Mailing ........................................................................................ 12 5.4 Data entry and processing of survey responses.......................... 13</p><p>6 Analysis of survey responses.................................................. 14 6.1 Software used for analysis of the suvey ...................................... 14 6.2 Quality and distribution of the overall response........................... 14 6.3 Grossing-up ................................................................................ 15 6.4 Summary of main steps included in the grossing excercise ........ 16 6.5 Results from the grossing up excercise....................................... 18 6.6 Making comparisons with 2001/02 estimates .............................. 19 </p><p>Annexes ................................................................................................ 20 Annex 1: Survey Questionnaire.............................................................. 20 Annex 2: Population ............................................................................... 27 </p><p>Professional Services Statistics Part 2 Methodology</p><p>CIC-ConstructionSkills</p><p>Professional Services Statistics Part 2 Methodology</p><p>Davis Langdon Management Consulting May 2007</p><p> 1 Introduction................................................................................. 1 1.1 Scope of the report ....................................................................... 1 1.2 Arrangements ............................................................................... 1 1.3 Scope of the study and definitions used in the survey................... 2</p><p>2 The consultation process........................................................... 5 2.1 Key features.................................................................................. 5 2.2 Overview....................................................................................... 5 2.3 Consultation with professional institutions and members of CIC ... 5</p><p>3 Development of the survey questionnaire ................................ 7 3.1 Key features.................................................................................. 7 3.2 Overview....................................................................................... 7 3.3 The pilot process........................................................................... 7</p><p>4 Survey sample and stratification ............................................... 9 4.1 Key features.................................................................................. 9 4.2 Overview....................................................................................... 9 4.3 Development of the sampling frame.............................................. 9</p><p>5 The administration of the survey............................................. 12 5.1 Key features................................................................................ 12 5.2 Overview..................................................................................... 12 5.3 Mailing ........................................................................................ 12 5.4 Data entry and processing of survey responses.......................... 13</p><p>6 Analysis of survey responses.................................................. 14 6.1 Software used for analysis of the suvey ...................................... 14 6.2 Quality and distribution of the overall response........................... 14 6.3 Grossing-up ................................................................................ 15 6.4 Summary of main steps included in the grossing excercise ........ 16 6.5 Results from the grossing up excercise....................................... 18 6.6 Making comparisons with 2001/02 estimates .............................. 19 </p><p>Annexes ................................................................................................ 20 Annex 1: Survey Questionnaire.............................................................. 20 Annex 2: Population ............................................................................... 27 25</p><p>21</p></li><li><p>Professional Services Statistics Part 2 Methodology</p><p>Davis Langdon Management Consulting May 2007</p><p>This survey is a collaborative project involving the Construction Industry Council, their </p><p>principal professional members and ConstructionSkills. The project follows earlier surveys </p><p>of the UK professional services sector that were conducted in 1996 and 2002. The principal </p><p>investigators for the research have been Davis Langdon Management Consulting (DLMC) </p><p>and Experian, the same consultancy practices that carried out the previous research. </p><p>The studys key objectives have been to: </p><p> quantify the volume of outputs of the construction professional services sector in the UK </p><p> provide various breakdowns of professional services output, which include: </p><p>o the type of services traded by UK construction professional practices </p><p>o the type of service providers and suppliers </p><p>o the main elements of construction work for which professional services are traded </p><p>o regional variations in the survey results </p><p> identify the various service functions undertaken within each of the major professional </p><p>disciplines </p><p> provide data and information that is of interest to all of the major stakeholders in the </p><p>project, including the CIC, its member organisations, ConstructionSkills and professional </p><p>services firms themselves </p><p> maximise the response rate to the survey to provide the most statistically robust results </p><p>within a sampling frame of 13,000 firms. </p><p>1.1 Scope of the report </p><p>Part 2 (this report) documents the methodology that has been adopted for the survey. It </p><p>contains the key issues that have effected the overall analysis and is intended to place the </p><p>more detailed findings in a methodological context. </p><p>Part 1 of the report (the main findings) provides the analysis of responses and highlights the </p><p>main issues that arise from them. There is a summary of key findings at the start of each </p><p>section of the report, which is followed by more detailed commentary and analysis. </p><p>1.2 Arrangements </p><p>1.2.1 Background to the project </p><p>Much of the approach to this survey has drawn heavily on our previous work Survey of UK </p><p>Construction Professional Services in 1996 and 2002 (CIC, 1997; CIC 2003). These were </p><p>the first surveys to quantify the added value of the Construction Professionals Services </p><p>Sector to the wider economy. </p><p>CIC-ConstructionSkills</p><p>Professional Services Statistics Part 2 Methodology 1</p></li><li><p>Professional Services Statistics Part 2 Methodology</p><p>Davis Langdon Management Consulting May 2007</p><p>1.2.2 Primary beneficiaries </p><p>Although all sectors of the construction industry are likely to benefit from a clearer </p><p>understanding of current professional activity, the objectives of this study have been </p><p>primarily focused upon meeting the information needs of the Construction Industry Council, </p><p>their members and those of ConstructionSkills. It is hoped that this study will help to </p><p>enhance the overall picture in terms of the value of construction-associated activity to the </p><p>UK economy. </p><p>1.3 Scope of the study and definitions used in the survey </p><p>1.3.1 General definitions </p><p>In order to ensure a level of comparability between this and previous surveys, the same </p><p>definitions that were used in the earlier studies have been maintained: </p><p> Construction: Construction is defined as those activities falling within Section F of the </p><p>2003 Standard Industrial Classification (SIC). This means building, civil engineering </p><p>and specialist contracting activity including the installation of products and systems </p><p>either in buildings or in association with building and civil engineering works </p><p> Construction Professional Services: Defined generally, but not exclusively, as those </p><p>firms operating in Section K, Division 74.2 of the SIC and includes architectural and </p><p>engineering activities and related technical consultancy. This also includes surveying, </p><p>town planning and project management. This definition is interpreted to include all </p><p>professional services provided by the member institutions of CIC and relating to </p><p>construction activities as defined above</p><p> Construction Professional Service Firms: These are firms whose primary activity is the </p><p>provision of construction professional services (accounting for more than 50% of their </p><p>total output) They include self-employed individuals delivering construction professional </p><p>services</p><p>1.3.2 Volume of output </p><p>The volume of total output of the construction professional services sector can be equated to </p><p>the financial value of the services provided. Value in this case is the amount chargeable to </p><p>customers for these services (in a given period) by all construction professional service </p><p>firms. Output is measured net in terms of firms turnover, i.e. excluding the value of work </p><p>done for firms by professional services sub-contractors. </p><p>1.3.3 Exclusions and inclusions </p><p>Certain public and private sector organisations employ large numbers of construction </p><p>professional staff whose primary activity is not the provision of construction professional </p><p>services, for example, a national bank may have its own construction procurement </p><p>department. In the case of these private sector organisations, unless the professional services </p><p>establishment is a separate trading company or partnership, its output will not have been </p><p>included within the sampling frame of this survey. </p><p>Both central government and local authorities employ construction professional services </p><p>staff. Some of these manage the client function while others offer construction professional </p><p>services internally. All central government professional services have been excluded. Local </p><p>CIC-ConstructionSkills</p><p>2 Professional Services Statistics Part 2 Methodology</p></li><li><p>Professional Services Statistics Part 2 Methodology</p><p>Davis Langdon Management Consulting May 2007</p><p>Authority technical departments have also been excluded from the sampling exercise, except </p><p>in those cases (such as known county councils highways departments) where the </p><p>construction professional services function has been established as a separate trading </p><p>company or partnership. </p><p>1.3.4 Geographical coverage </p><p>The geographical coverage of the study is the whole of the UK. The work of foreign-based </p><p>subsidiaries of British construction professional service firms has not been included, unless </p><p>income is remitted to the UK. </p><p>1.3.5 Breakdowns of fee income </p><p>The type of services supplier is a key means of classification that has been used in this </p><p>survey. Suppliers have broadly been classed in terms of their size and by broad professional </p><p>service function. Size has been measured in terms of number of personnel or fee income </p><p>(turnover). Workable size categories have been developed during the study. Service </p><p>categories relate both to ways in which companies describe themselves and by the dominant </p><p>services that CPS firms provide (which has been derived from the data). </p><p>Breakdowns by type of construction work incorporate the standard categories that are used in </p><p>the formulation of the DTIs Housing and Construction Statistics, specific types of </p><p>construction project (such as offices), and the type of client (both public and private). The </p><p>most basic breakdowns distinguish between housing, building and infrastructure and whether </p><p>construction professional services are generated on new build, refurbishment, or repair </p><p>maintenance and improvement (RMI). </p><p>Breakdowns of fee income by region relate to the standard government planning regions. </p><p>Construction professional services are frequently provided from a location remote from the </p><p>construction project on which they are generated. The method used in this study to describe </p><p>regional output relates to the location of the actual projects as opposed to the location of </p><p>the firm. This is a key difference between this work and data collected during the </p><p>compilation of the Annual Business Inquiry (ABI), where the firms location is used to </p><p>provide regional breakdowns. </p><p>1.3.6 Service functions provided by types of firm </p><p>It has been an objective of this study to measure the proportion of fee income that is </p><p>generated on the provision of services that lie outside of the CPS firms core disciplines. The </p><p>extent to which surveying firms, for example, now undertake work traditionally associated </p><p>with engineers has been examined. This has been achieved by asking respondents to describe </p><p>their fee income in terms of five main service headings and their associated sub-sets of </p><p>professional activity. </p><p>1.3.7 Monitoring mechanism </p><p>The research team recogni...</p></li></ul>