Statistical Literacy Developing statistical literacy with Year 9 students.

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Statistical Literacy Developing statistical literacy with Year 9 students. Viney Shandil, Semisi Talakiaatu (Marcellin College) Phil Doyle (Team Solutions - University of Auckland) and Dr Sashi Sharma (University of Waikato). Mo st people will be consumers of statistics rather than - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  • Statistical LiteracyDeveloping statistical literacy with Year 9 students.

    Viney Shandil, Semisi Talakiaatu (Marcellin College)Phil Doyle (Team Solutions - University of Auckland) and Dr Sashi Sharma (University of Waikato)

  • Most people will be consumers of statistics rather than producers (Iddo Gal, 2002)

  • Statistical literacy is the ability to read and interpretdata: the ability to use statistics as evidence in arguments. Statistical literacy is a competency: the ability to think critically about statistics.

    Milo Schield (2004) Statistical literacy: Thinking critically about statistics

  • Statistical literacyAccording to Gal (2002) there are five interrelated knowledgebases that must be used to exhibit statistical literacymathematical knowledgestatistical knowledgeknowledge of the contextliteracy skillscritical questionsas well as dispositional elements that includebeliefs and attitudesa critical stanceGal, I. (2002). Adults statistical literacy: Meanings, components,responsibilities. International Statistical Review, 70(1) 1-51

  • LEVELEVALUATEWhat?Source?Criteria?3Effectiveness of different displaysUndertaken by othersRepresenting the findings of a statistical investigation or probability activity4StatementsMade by othersFindings of a statistical investigation or probability activity5Statistical Investigations or Probability ActivitiesUndertaken by othersData collection methods Choice of measuresValidity of findings6Statistical ReportsIn the mediaDisplaysStatisticsProcessesProbabilitiesClaims

  • Statistical literacy has been positioned as an important skill for citizens and a desired outcome of statistics education. However, while the knowledge bases and beliefs and attitudes that underlie statistically literate behavior have been outlined in some detail, it is less clear how to develop themIddo Gal

  • Key findings from TLRIStatistical literacy is more than the ability to make calculations and read tables and graphs. Students are actually quite good at this.

    Students need to be exposed to good statistics

    All students can begin to think critically in statistics

    Literacy knowledge is critical to statistical literacy

    Contextual knowledge is a barrier for many students.

    Developing a critical statistical literacy can be a challenge to classroom norms, community and school practices

    There is a need for quality assessment and clear progressions

  • Assessing statistical literacyCritical Statistical Literacy FrameworkAdapted from Watson & Callingham (2003)Stage 0 1 Idiosyncratic and informal Questions and or statements are not based on the data

    Stage 2 Consistent Non-critical - Accurate use of statistical skills, appropriate but non-critical engagement with the problem and/or context of the problem

    Stage 3Early critical Can attend to more than one aspect of the problem and/or context of the problem to show relational thinking

    Stage 4Advanced Critical There is questioning, critical engagement with context; deals with subtle language, proportional reasoning.

  • A need for good statisticshttp://www.stats.govt.nz/

    http://www.babynamewizard.com/

    http://www.gapminder.org/

    Figure it Out Statistics in the Media Level 4+

  • Any questions!

    ***Gal (2002) suggests there are two components to statistical literacy in his research of adults statistical practices. The components of statistical literacy are:the ability to interpret and evaluate critically statistical information in a variety of contexts and when relevant.the ability to discuss or communicate this understanding in a fashion that can have an impact on decision-making.(Gal, 2002, p.2-3)*Or assess them*Critical thinking is central to Statistical literacy

    May be not explicit in Statistics AOs in NZC. However, is in NZC KCsWhen students are asked to read text and interpret data displays it is likely to be difficult for many students due to language and literacy levels.

    Statistical and probabilistic meanings are very subtle. So we were very explicit about the language and language structures we used.

    Literacy can and must be addressed in the mathematics classroom.We need to take advantage of language/literacy support andprofessional development

    Students also need to encounter models of good or fair statistical reporting if they are expected to act as informed consumers. Students' ability to critically reflect when they can compare and reflect on the differences between examples of what to do and what not to do.

    Our attempt was to introduce statistical reports, different data displaysand media reports into the classroom.

    When students are asked to read text and interpret data displays it is likely to be difficult for many students due to contextDebating/defending positionsPublicClass discussionConcensusCross-curricular English, Science , Social -studies

    Critical questions and Dispositions

    Literacy skills, critical literacy and critical thinking skills need to be taught to students in mathematics to achieve the goals of a broader definition of statistical literacy.

    Can dispositions be taught? Are they age specific?

    Developing an understanding of the context, and an ability to draw conclusions and/or inferences based on data demands students to know or be prepared to know about a wide range of topics.

    While teachers are fairly good at helping students to pose questions and deal with variation, we are not as good at helping students not just read the data, but read between the data, and read beyond the data.

    Attempting to make statistics more accessible and applicable to students by using meaningful real-life contexts is the key. Finding ways to allow students to lead this is a challenge.

    Statistical and contextual areas of statistical thinking need to developsimultaneouslyDeveloping a critical statistical literacy can be a challenge to some community and school practices.

    Our attempt to foster critical thinkers caused tension around who was speaking and what was said in the classroom.

    Again attempting to make statistics more accessible and applicable to students by using meaningful real-life contexts was a challenge.

    *Uses a SOLO taxonomy approachParallels with NCEALink to numeracy explaining their thinking - maybe not critical

    We have adapted to have 4 levels when looking at our students work.**

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