Startup Communication for Co-Founders, July 2014

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Slides from my workshop on "Startup Communication" for 9 pairs of co-founders at Flixster in San Francisco, July 24, 2014.

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Slide 1

StartupPhoto by Heisenberg Media [link]CommunicationEd Batista@ FlixsterJuly 24, 20141Photo: Seth Anderson Who am I?Executive coachInstructor @ Stanford GSBwww.edbatista.comHBR Guide to Coaching Your Employees2Photo by Alex Eflon [link] Where are we1:1 communicationGroup normsYou & your colleaguesgoing?3 How will weConceptsExercises & debriefs1:1 feedbackget there?Photo by Chloe Fan [link]4 Startups ashuman systemsPhoto by Heisenberg Media [link]Complex group dynamicsCommunication = survivalFeedback = learningRelationships matterLeaders as leversReadMore5 Founder as avatarAvataraThe ideal made realCompany made in your image6 Concepts #1Todays headlineThe simplest feedback modelFeelingsThe net

Photo by Lee Nachtigal [link]700:43 5people avoid being direct because they equate it with being accusatory, which has gotten them in trouble in the past. Also, when people do things that bother us we impute negative motive and poor personality

Must enter into the exchange with a different orientation: the assumption that the other is well-intentioned, has goals with which you can align, but their behavior is somehow doing them in.. Listen to what they say- what are their concerns, desires, fears?

Its tough to get the other persons goals when we dont like them, are angry at them and have already made a bunch of attributions

Watch the language and speak in the others language: e.g. what are your goals vs. how do you want to be perceived would work better for an executive; also be careful with stoking the others ego (too transparent) speaking to the others best interest rather than their ego works better and is more authentic.

Subtlety tends to get us in trouble, but so can directness. How direct should you be? How far should you push? were simply shifting probabilities; no one thing is going to work every time for everyone. The headlineFeedback is stressfulSo criticize with skill& give more heartfelt praisePhoto by Garry Knight [link]ReadMore800:55 5 Your goal is to learn about the others reality -- not to win (or give up

First, Listen! Again, listening is the art of seeking to understand vs. seeking to be understood. Good listening skills include:Focused/Active listeningParaphrase and acknowledge Remember your inquiry skills and ask open ended questionsListening and understanding does not meanagreeing with

Use the Interpersonal Cycle to deconstruct others statement when they are over the netTry to keep from explaining yourself [always sounds defensive]Instead, share the impact of the feedback on you.Also validate the other persons experience and express interest in working things outSay when youve had enough (or when the timing is not right)

Move toward mutual problem-solving -- you are not obligated to changeNow you have data on which to make a more informed choice

The simplestWhen you do [X], I feel [Y].feedback modelPhoto by Ed Yourdon [link]900:55 5 Your goal is to learn about the others reality -- not to win (or give up

First, Listen! Again, listening is the art of seeking to understand vs. seeking to be understood. Good listening skills include:Focused/Active listeningParaphrase and acknowledge Remember your inquiry skills and ask open ended questionsListening and understanding does not meanagreeing with

Use the Interpersonal Cycle to deconstruct others statement when they are over the netTry to keep from explaining yourself [always sounds defensive]Instead, share the impact of the feedback on you.Also validate the other persons experience and express interest in working things outSay when youve had enough (or when the timing is not right)

Move toward mutual problem-solving -- you are not obligated to changeNow you have data on which to make a more informed choice

The simplestWhen you do [X], I feel [Y].feedback model1000:55 5 Your goal is to learn about the others reality -- not to win (or give up

First, Listen! Again, listening is the art of seeking to understand vs. seeking to be understood. Good listening skills include:Focused/Active listeningParaphrase and acknowledge Remember your inquiry skills and ask open ended questionsListening and understanding does not meanagreeing with

Use the Interpersonal Cycle to deconstruct others statement when they are over the netTry to keep from explaining yourself [always sounds defensive]Instead, share the impact of the feedback on you.Also validate the other persons experience and express interest in working things outSay when youve had enough (or when the timing is not right)

Move toward mutual problem-solving -- you are not obligated to changeNow you have data on which to make a more informed choice

FeelingsDisclosing feelings = vulnerableBut feelings influenceAnd vulnerability closenessComfort with discomfortPhoto by Rebecca Krebs [link]1100:55 5 Your goal is to learn about the others reality -- not to win (or give up

First, Listen! Again, listening is the art of seeking to understand vs. seeking to be understood. Good listening skills include:Focused/Active listeningParaphrase and acknowledge Remember your inquiry skills and ask open ended questionsListening and understanding does not meanagreeing with

Use the Interpersonal Cycle to deconstruct others statement when they are over the netTry to keep from explaining yourself [always sounds defensive]Instead, share the impact of the feedback on you.Also validate the other persons experience and express interest in working things outSay when youve had enough (or when the timing is not right)

Move toward mutual problem-solving -- you are not obligated to changeNow you have data on which to make a more informed choice

The netDavid BradfordHow to improve communication?How to create closeness and connection?ReadMorePhoto by The Mighty Tim Inconnu [link]12 The net

Me

YouYourresponseMybehaviorMyintention13 The netStay on our side of the netFocus on observed behaviorDisclose our responseWhen you do [X], I feel [Y].

14 Concepts #2Photo by Lee Nachtigal [link]5 levelsHierarchy of needsSafety, trust, intimacySocial threatSCARF modelRelationshipsThe net (again)1500:43 5people avoid being direct because they equate it with being accusatory, which has gotten them in trouble in the past. Also, when people do things that bother us we impute negative motive and poor personality

Must enter into the exchange with a different orientation: the assumption that the other is well-intentioned, has goals with which you can align, but their behavior is somehow doing them in.. Listen to what they say- what are their concerns, desires, fears?

Its tough to get the other persons goals when we dont like them, are angry at them and have already made a bunch of attributions

Watch the language and speak in the others language: e.g. what are your goals vs. how do you want to be perceived would work better for an executive; also be careful with stoking the others ego (too transparent) speaking to the others best interest rather than their ego works better and is more authentic.

Subtlety tends to get us in trouble, but so can directness. How direct should you be? How far should you push? were simply shifting probabilities; no one thing is going to work every time for everyone. 5 levelsPhoto by Rita Willaert [link]Richard FranciscoIn what ways do we communicate?Increasing levels of difficulty, risk & learning16Be empathetic and reassuring Im imagining this could be hard to hear I hope you can hear it as in invitation vs. rejection or criticism; if I were you I would be having a hard time

Reassuring is affective, reiterate intent is cognitive

How we receive feedback and handle our own defensiveness has a big impact on the willingness of others to give us feedback

5 levels1: Ritual2: Extended Ritual3: Content4: Feelings About Content5: Feelings About Each OtherPhoto by Rita Willaert [link]17Be empathetic and reassuring Im imagining this could be hard to hear I hope you can hear it as in invitation vs. rejection or criticism; if I were you I would be having a hard time

Reassuring is affective, reiterate intent is cognitive

How we receive feedback and handle our own defensiveness has a big impact on the willingness of others to give us feedback

5 levels5: Feelings About Each OtherHardestRiskiestMost powerful for feedbackPhoto by Rita Willaert [link]18Be empathetic and reassuring Im imagining this could be hard to hear I hope you can hear it as in invitation vs. rejection or criticism; if I were you I would be having a hard time

Reassuring is affective, reiterate intent is cognitive

How we receive feedback and handle our own defensiveness has a big impact on the willingness of others to give us feedback

Hierarchy of needsPhoto by Wilhelm Joys Anderson [link] Abraham MaslowWhat motivates us as human beings?1900:55 5 Your goal is to learn about the others reality -- not to win (or give up

First, Listen! Again, listening is the art of seeking to understand vs. seeking to be understood. Good listening skills include:Focused/Active listeningParaphrase and acknowledge Remember your inquiry skills and ask open ended questionsListening and understanding does not meanagreeing with

Use the Interpersonal Cycle to deconstruct others statement when they are over the netTry to keep from explaining yourself [always sounds defensive]Instead, share the impact of the feedback on you.Also validate the other persons experience and express interest in working things outSay when youve had enough (or when the timing is not right)

Move toward mutual problem-solving -- you are not obligated to changeNow you have data on which to make a more informed choice

Hierarchy of needsPhoto by Wilhelm Joys Anderson [link]PhysiologicalSafetyLove & belongingEsteemSelf-actualization 2000:55 5 Your goal is to learn about the others reality -- not to win (or give up

First, Listen! Again, listening is the art of seeking to understand vs. seeking to be understood. Good listening skills include:Focused/Active listeningParaphrase and acknowledge Remember your inquiry skills and ask open ended questionsListening and understanding does not meanagreeing with

Use the Interpersonal Cycle to deconstruct others statement when they are over the netTry to keep from explaining yourself [always sounds defensive]Instead, share the impact of the feedback on you.Also validate the other persons experience and express interest in working things outSay when youve had enough (or when the timing is not right)

Move toward mutual problem-solving -- you are not obligated to changeNow you have data on which to make a more informed choice

Hierarchy of needsPhoto by Wilhelm Joys Anderson [link] Parallels in groups & relationships2100:55 5 Your goal is to learn about the others reality -- not to win (or give up

First, Listen! Again, listening is the art of seeking to understand vs. seeking to be understood. Good listening skills include:Focused/Active listeningParaphrase and acknowledge Remember your inquiry skills and ask open ended questionsListening and understanding does not meanagreeing with

Use the Interpersonal Cycle to deconstruct others statement when they are over the netTry to keep from explaining yourself [always sounds defensive]Instead, share the impact of the feedback on you.Also validate the other persons experience and express interest in working things outSay when youve had enough (or when the timing is not right)

Move toward mutual problem-solving -- you are not obligated to changeNow you have data on which to make a more informed choice

Hierarchy of needsPhoto by Wilhelm Joys Anderson [link] Psychological safety, trust & intimacyExperiments, risk-taking & vulnerabilityLearning, self-awareness & change In groups & relationships2200:55 5 Your goal is to learn about the others reality -- not to win (or give up

First, Listen! Again, listening is the art of seeking to understand vs. seeking to be understood. Good listening skills include:Focused/Active listeningParaphrase and acknowledge Remember your inquiry skills and ask open ended questionsListening and understanding does not meanagreeing with

Use the Interpersonal Cycle to deconstruct others statement when they are over the netTry to keep from explaining yourself [always sounds defensive]Instead, share the impact of the feedback on you.Also validate the other persons experience and express interest in working things outSay when youve had enough (or when the timing is not right)

Move toward mutual problem-solving -- you are not obligated to changeNow you have data on which to make a more informed choice

Safety, trust,Photo by Carly Lesser & Art Drauglis [link]intimacy2300:55 5 Your goal is to learn about the others reality -- not to win (or give up

First, Listen! Again, listening is the art of seeking to understand vs. seeking to be understood. Good listening skills include:Focused/Active listeningParaphrase and acknowledge Remember your inquiry skills and ask open ended questionsListening and understanding does not meanagreeing with

Use the Interpersonal Cycle to deconstruct others statement when they are over the netTry to keep from explaining yourself [always sounds defensive]Instead, share the impact of the feedback on you.Also validate the other persons experience and express interest in working things outSay when youve had enough (or when the timing is not right)

Move toward mutual problem-solving -- you are not obligated to changeNow you have data on which to make a more informed choice

Safety, trust,intimacySafety = I wont get hurtTrust = I believe you & you believe meIntimacy = We can make the private public

2400:55 5 Your goal is to learn about the others reality -- not to win (or give up

First, Listen! Again, listening is the art of seeking to understand vs. seeking to be understood. Good listening skills include:Focused/Active listeningParaphrase and acknowledge Remember your inquiry skills and ask open ended questionsListening and understanding does not meanagreeing with

Use the Interpersonal Cycle to deconstruct others statement when they are over the netTry to keep from explaining yourself [always sounds defensive]Instead, share the impact of the feedback on you.Also validate the other persons experience and express interest in working things outSay when youve had enough (or when the timing is not right)

Move toward mutual problem-solving -- you are not obligated to changeNow you have data on which to make a more informed choice

Safety, trust,intimacyFeedback can create these qualitiesBut theres a problem

2500:55 5 Your goal is to learn about the others reality -- not to win (or give up

First, Listen! Again, listening is the art of seeking to understand vs. seeking to be understood. Good listening skills include:Focused/Active listeningParaphrase and acknowledge Remember your inquiry skills and ask open ended questionsListening and understanding does not meanagreeing with

Use the Interpersonal Cycle to deconstruct others statement when they are over the netTry to keep from explaining yourself [always sounds defensive]Instead, share the impact of the feedback on you.Also validate the other persons experience and express interest in working things outSay when youve had enough (or when the timing is not right)

Move toward mutual problem-solving -- you are not obligated to changeNow you have data on which to make a more informed choice

Can I give youPhoto by Robbie Grubbs [link] some feedback?2600:55 5 Your goal is to learn about the others reality -- not to win (or give up

First, Listen! Again, listening is the art of seeking to understand vs. seeking to be understood. Good listening skills include:Focused/Active listeningParaphrase and acknowledge Remember your inquiry skills and ask open ended questionsListening and understanding does not meanagreeing with

Use the Interpersonal Cycle to deconstruct others statement when they are over the netTry to keep from explaining yourself [always sounds defensive]Instead, share the impact of the feedback on you.Also validate the other persons experience and express interest in working things outSay when youve had enough (or when the timing is not right)

Move toward mutual problem-solving -- you are not obligated to changeNow you have data on which to make a more informed choice

Feedback andPhoto by Mykl Roventine [link]social threat27 Threat responseaka Fight, flight or freezePhysiological signs?Photo by State Farm [link]28 Threat responseaka Fight, flight or freezeEmotional signs?Photo by State Farm [link]29 Threat responseaka Fight, flight or freezeCognitive signsDecision-makingProblem-solvingCollaborationPhoto by State Farm [link]30 Social threat(Some) social situations Physical threatsMany times/dayMost common location?

31 Social threatPhysiological/emotional response plusCognitive impairmentDecision-makingProblem-solvingCollaborationPhoto by Heisenberg Media [link]32 Social threatResult?Massive communication failureWe give feedback ineffectivelyWe receive it poorly

Photo by Heisenberg Media [link]33Photo by Andrew Vargas [link] SCARF modelReadMoreDavid RockWhat social situationstrigger a threatresponse?34Photo by Andrew Vargas [link] SCARF modelDavid RockWhat social situations trigger a threat response?How can we minimize the risk of social threat?How can we create safety?35 SCARF modelStatusCertaintyAutonomyRelatednessFairnessReadMore36 Founder as avatarThink about you and your partnerHow might you trigger social threats in others?37Photo by Andrew Vargas [link] Use the modelWhen giving feedbackBe mindful of statusMinimize uncertaintyMaximize autonomyBuild the relationship*Play fair*38 Use the modelWhen getting feedbackCultivate in-the-moment awarenessRecognize our threat responseManage our emotions (norms help*)Create safety for ourselves39Photo by Harsha KR [link] RelationshipsJohn GottmanWhat characterizes successful relationships?ReadMore40 RelationshipsFeeling known by the otherA culture of appreciationResponding to bidsMutual influence415:1 positive to negativeEmotional bank account Relationships& conflictPhoto by Connor Tartar [link]42 Founder as avatarThink about your partnerHows your emotional bank account?What are you doing to build the relationship?43 The netPhoto by The Mighty Tim Inconnu [link] (again)44 The netHow to improve communication?How to minimize defensiveness?How can we play fair?Photo by The Mighty Tim Inconnu [link]45 The net

Me

YouYourresponseMybehaviorMyintention46 What I know

MeMyintentionMybehavior47 What I dont

YouYourresponse48 What you know

YouYourresponseMybehavior49 What you dont

MeMyintention50 Use the modelIntent impactMy intention doesnt guarantee your responseImpact intentYour response wasnt necessarily my intention

51 Use the modelWhen weStay on our side of the netFocus on observed behaviorDisclose our responseWhen you do [X], I feel [Y].

52 Use the modelResult?Lower risk of social threatLess chance of defensivenessIncreased sense of fairness53 Founder as avatarThink about your partnerWhen do you cross their net?When do they cross yours?54 To sum upPhoto by Pranav Yaddanapudi [link]Build safety, trust & intimacyUse the modelsMinimize social threatLess stressful feedbackMore learning 55 Concepts #3Photo by Lee Nachtigal [link]Emotional intelligence & groupsTalking about feelingsGroup norms5600:43 5people avoid being direct because they equate it with being accusatory, which has gotten them in trouble in the past. Also, when people do things that bother us we impute negative motive and poor personality

Must enter into the exchange with a different orientation: the assumption that the other is well-intentioned, has goals with which you can align, but their behavior is somehow doing them in.. Listen to what they say- what are their concerns, desires, fears?

Its tough to get the other persons goals when we dont like them, are angry at them and have already made a bunch of attributions

Watch the language and speak in the others language: e.g. what are your goals vs. how do you want to be perceived would work better for an executive; also be careful with stoking the others ego (too transparent) speaking to the others best interest rather than their ego works better and is more authentic.

Subtlety tends to get us in trouble, but so can directness. How direct should you be? How far should you push? were simply shifting probabilities; no one thing is going to work every time for everyone. EQ and groupsWhy care?Effective teamsParticipation, cooperation, collaborationCant mandate behaviorPhoto by Woodleywonderworks [link]ReadMore57 EQ and groupsEssential conditionsMutual trustGroup identity (feeling of belonging)Group efficacy (belief in value of the team)Strongly affected by group EQPhoto by Woodleywonderworks [link]58 EQ and groupsIndividual EQEmotional awarenessEmotion regulation ( suppression)Inward (ones own emotions)Outward (others emotions)Photo by Woodleywonderworks [link]59 EQ and groupsHigh EQ individuals High EQ groupGroup norms determine group EQCreate awareness of emotionHelp regulate emotionPhoto by Woodleywonderworks [link]60 Founder as avatarYour behavior = company normsHow aware are you of your emotions?How well do you regulate your emotions?61 Talking aboutAffect labelingAmygdalaTalking disrupts negative emotionTalking about emotion > Thinking about emotionfeelingsPhoto by Andrew Yee [link]ReadMore62 Talking aboutGroup normsNorms define whats normativeCan we talk about feelings here?Overcome embarrassmentfeelingsPhoto by Andrew Yee [link]63 Our normsPhoto by jm3 [link]64 Our normsConsider company normsCreate awareness of emotionsHelp regulate emotionsReadMorePhoto by jm3 [link]65

We never We always1. Spend time getting to knowothers personally. Norms that createawareness66

We never We always2. Regularly ask how others are doing. Norms that createawareness67

We never We always3. Share thoughts and emotionswith others in the moment. Norms that createawareness68

We never We always4. Ask others who have been quiet in a discussion what they think. Norms that createawareness69

We never We always5. Fully explore others resistanceto our decisions. Norms that createawareness70

We never We always6. Set aside time to discuss and evaluateour own effectiveness. Norms that createawareness71

We never We always7. Acknowledge and discuss the feelingin the group in the moment. Norms that createawareness72

We never We always1. Have clear ground rules for productive behavior in meetings. Norms that helpregulate73

We never We always2. Call out behavior that violatesthose ground rules. Norms that helpregulate74

We never We always3. Express acceptance ofothers emotions. Norms that helpregulate75

We never We always4. Make time to discuss difficulties within the teamand the emotions they generate. Norms that helpregulate76

We never We always5. Use playfulness to acknowledgeand relieve stress. Norms that helpregulate77

We never We always6. Express optimism aboutthe teams capabilities. Norms that helpregulate78

We never We always7. Provide others with positivefeedback in the moment. Norms that helpregulate79 Our normsWhat norms do we have?What norms do we need?What can you do as leaders?

Photo by jm3 [link]80 Concepts #4Photo by Lee Nachtigal [link]Positive feedbackMindsetSoft start8100:43 5people avoid being direct because they equate it with being accusatory, which has gotten them in trouble in the past. Also, when people do things that bother us we impute negative motive and poor personality

Must enter into the exchange with a different orientation: the assumption that the other is well-intentioned, has goals with which you can align, but their behavior is somehow doing them in.. Listen to what they say- what are their concerns, desires, fears?

Its tough to get the other persons goals when we dont like them, are angry at them and have already made a bunch of attributions

Watch the language and speak in the others language: e.g. what are your goals vs. how do you want to be perceived would work better for an executive; also be careful with stoking the others ego (too transparent) speaking to the others best interest rather than their ego works better and is more authentic.

Subtlety tends to get us in trouble, but so can directness. How direct should you be? How far should you push? were simply shifting probabilities; no one thing is going to work every time for everyone. Positive feedbackA paradoxSo importantSo often ineffectiveWhats wrong?Photo by Aaron Matthews [link]82 Positive feedbackWe may not trust itWe may even resent itWe often praise the wrong thingsReadMore83 Positive feedbackDont praise to buffer criticismUse a soft start*84 Positive feedbackDont praise to overcome resistanceUse other means of influence85 Positive feedbackDont praise abilityPraise effort and persistence86Carol DweckHow do we feel about our abilities?How do we feel about our mistakes?

MindsetPhoto by Tuomas Puikkonen [link]ReadMore87Talent & intelligence are inherent traitsMistakes are failures or character flawsNegative emotional response to mistakes

Talent & intelligence can be developedMistakes are learning opportunitiesPay close attention to mistakes & learn moreFixedGrowth MindsetReadMore88 Soft startPhoto by Phil McElhinney [link]Not like this89Be empathetic and reassuring Im imagining this could be hard to hear I hope you can hear it as in invitation vs. rejection or criticism; if I were you I would be having a hard time

Reassuring is affective, reiterate intent is cognitive

How we receive feedback and handle our own defensiveness has a big impact on the willingness of others to give us feedback

Soft startPhoto by OakleyOriginals [link]Like this90Be empathetic and reassuring Im imagining this could be hard to hear I hope you can hear it as in invitation vs. rejection or criticism; if I were you I would be having a hard time

Reassuring is affective, reiterate intent is cognitive

How we receive feedback and handle our own defensiveness has a big impact on the willingness of others to give us feedback

Soft startBegin with positive intent(But dont bullshit)Emphasize mutual goalsBe mindful of your stressReadMore91 5 levels (again)Photo by Rita Willaert [link]92Be empathetic and reassuring Im imagining this could be hard to hear I hope you can hear it as in invitation vs. rejection or criticism; if I were you I would be having a hard time

Reassuring is affective, reiterate intent is cognitive

How we receive feedback and handle our own defensiveness has a big impact on the willingness of others to give us feedback

5 levels1: Ritual2: Extended Ritual3: Content4: Feelings About Content5: Feelings About Each OtherPhoto by Rita Willaert [link]93Be empathetic and reassuring Im imagining this could be hard to hear I hope you can hear it as in invitation vs. rejection or criticism; if I were you I would be having a hard time

Reassuring is affective, reiterate intent is cognitive

How we receive feedback and handle our own defensiveness has a big impact on the willingness of others to give us feedback

5 levels5: Feelings About Each OtherHardestRiskiestMost powerful for feedbackPhoto by Rita Willaert [link]94Be empathetic and reassuring Im imagining this could be hard to hear I hope you can hear it as in invitation vs. rejection or criticism; if I were you I would be having a hard time

Reassuring is affective, reiterate intent is cognitive

How we receive feedback and handle our own defensiveness has a big impact on the willingness of others to give us feedback

1:1 feedbackPhoto by Ana Karenina [link]ReadMore95Setting the Context for Feedback Groundrules Discussion (What groundrules would help me be an effective participant in giving and receiving feedback)Organize folks so that each person has two people they work with/know wellGive them time to plan feedback with eachBring them back and do speed dating format feedback two rounds so that every person has done it twiceFacilitator calls out time for switching"Second conversation" about feedback 1:1 feedbackWhen getting feedbackObserve your threat responseAsk for specific feedback?96Setting the Context for Feedback Groundrules Discussion (What groundrules would help me be an effective participant in giving and receiving feedback)Organize folks so that each person has two people they work with/know wellGive them time to plan feedback with eachBring them back and do speed dating format feedback two rounds so that every person has done it twiceFacilitator calls out time for switching"Second conversation" about feedback 1:1 feedbackWhen giving feedbackPositive feedback encouragedStay on your side of the netWhen you do [X], I feel [Y].Use the Vocabulary of Emotions97Setting the Context for Feedback Groundrules Discussion (What groundrules would help me be an effective participant in giving and receiving feedback)Organize folks so that each person has two people they work with/know wellGive them time to plan feedback with eachBring them back and do speed dating format feedback two rounds so that every person has done it twiceFacilitator calls out time for switching"Second conversation" about feedback ChallengeyourselfPhoto by Daniel Oines [link]98 Thank you!Photo by Brett Casadonte [link]99Setting the Context for Feedback Groundrules Discussion (What groundrules would help me be an effective participant in giving and receiving feedback)Organize folks so that each person has two people they work with/know wellGive them time to plan feedback with eachBring them back and do speed dating format feedback two rounds so that every person has done it twiceFacilitator calls out time for switching"Second conversation" about feedbackBuilding a Feedback-Rich CultureHBR Guide to Coaching Your EmployeesMy background & coaching practice:www.edbatista.com/about.htmlContact me:www.edbatista.com/contact.html For more info100