slide 1 of 27 chemistry 1.1 chapter 1: introduction to chemistry

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  • Slide 1
  • Slide 1 of 27 Chemistry 1.1 Chapter 1: Introduction To Chemistry
  • Slide 2
  • Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Chemistry > Slide 2 of 27 What Is Chemistry? Why is the scope of chemistry so vast? 1.1
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  • Slide 3 of 27 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall > Chemistry What Is Chemistry? Matter is anything that has mass and occupies space. Chemistry is the study of the composition of matter and the changes that matter undergoes. 1.1
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  • Slide 4 of 27 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Chemistry > What Is Chemistry? Because living and nonliving things are made of matter, chemistry affects all aspects of life and most natural events. 1.1
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  • Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Chemistry > Slide 5 of 27 Areas of Study What are five traditional areas of study in chemistry? 1.1
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  • Slide 6 of 27 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Chemistry > Areas of Study Five traditional areas of study are organic chemistry inorganic chemistry biochemistry analytical chemistry physical chemistry 1.1
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  • Slide 7 of 27 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Chemistry > Organic chemistry is defined as the study of all chemicals containing carbon. Areas of Study 1.1
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  • Slide 8 of 27 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Chemistry > Inorganic chemistry is the study of chemicals that, in general, do not contain carbon. Areas of Study 1.1
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  • Slide 9 of 27 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Chemistry > The study of processes that take place in organisms is biochemistry. Areas of Study 1.1
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  • Slide 10 of 27 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Chemistry > Analytical chemistry is the area of study that focuses on the composition of matter. Areas of Study 1.1
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  • Slide 11 of 27 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Chemistry > Physical chemistry is the area that deals with the mechanism, the rate, and the energy transfer that occurs when matter undergoes a change. Areas of Study 1.1
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  • Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Chemistry > Slide 12 of 27 Pure and Applied Chemistry How are pure and applied chemistry related? 1.1
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  • Slide 13 of 27 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Chemistry > Pure and Applied Chemistry Pure chemistry is the pursuit of chemical knowledge for its own sake. Applied chemistry is research that is directed toward a practical goal or application. 1.1
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  • Slide 14 of 27 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Chemistry > Pure and Applied Chemistry Pure research can lead directly to an application, but an application can exist before research is done to explain how it works. 1.1
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  • Slide 15 of 27 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Chemistry > Pure and Applied Chemistry Nylon In the early 1930s, Wallace Carothers produced nylon while researching cotton and silk. A team of scientists and engineers applied Carotherss research to the commercial production of nylon. 1.1
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  • Slide 16 of 27 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Chemistry > Pure and Applied Chemistry Aspirin Long before researchers figured out how aspirin works, people used it to relieve pain, and doctors prescribed it for patients who were at risk for a heart attack. In 1971, it was discovered that aspirin can block the production of a group of chemicals that cause pain and lead to the formation of blood clots. This is an example of pure research. 1.1
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  • Slide 17 of 27 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Chemistry > Pure and Applied Chemistry Technology Technology is the means by which a society provides its members with those things needed and desired. Technology allows humans to do some things more quickly or with less effort. There are debates about the risks and benefits of technology. 1.1
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  • Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Chemistry > Slide 18 of 27 Why Study Chemistry? What are three general reasons to study chemistry? 1.1
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  • Slide 19 of 27 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Chemistry > Why Study Chemistry? Chemistry can be useful in explaining the natural world, preparing people for career opportunities, and producing informed citizens. 1.1
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  • Slide 20 of 27 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall > Chemistry Why Study Chemistry? Explaining the Natural World Chemistry can help you satisfy your natural desire to understand how things work. 1.1
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  • Slide 21 of 27 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall > Chemistry Why Study Chemistry? Preparing For a Career Many careers require knowledge of chemistry. A photographer uses chemical processes to control the development of photographs in a darkroom. 1.1
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  • Slide 22 of 27 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall > Chemistry Why Study Chemistry? Being an Informed Citizen Knowledge of chemistry and other sciences can help you evaluate the data presented, arrive at an informed opinion, and take appropriate action. 1.1
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  • Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Slide 23 of 27 1. Which of these traditional areas of study mostly involve compounds containing carbon? (1) organic chemistry (2) inorganic chemistry (3) biochemistry a.(1) and (2) b.(1) and (3) c.(2) and (3) d.(1), (2), and (3) 1.1 Section Quiz
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  • Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Slide 24 of 27 2. Which phrase best describes applied chemistry? a.the pursuit of knowledge for its own sake b.research that answers a general question c.addresses fundamental aspects of a question d.research directed toward a practical goal 1.1 Section Quiz
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  • Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Slide 25 of 27 3. Informed citizens are most likely to a.provide funds for scientific research. b.determine which areas of research are valid. c.decide who is qualified to do research. d.influence the development of technology. 1.1 Section Quiz
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  • Homework: read Section 1.1 and Pages 5-8 in your lab Manual (see lab safety powerpoint)
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  • Slide 27 of 27 Chemistry 1.1 Chapter 1: Section 2 Chemistry Far and Wide
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  • Slide 28 of 27 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall > Chemistry Materials What impact do chemists have on materials, energy, medicine, agriculture, the environment, and the study of the universe? 1.2
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  • Slide 29 of 27 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall > Chemistry Materials Chemists design materials to fit specific needs. 1.2
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  • Slide 30 of 27 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall > Chemistry Materials In 1948, George de Mestral took a close look at the burrs that stuck to his clothing. He saw that each burr was covered with many tiny hooks. In 1955, de Mestral patented the design for the hook-and- loop tapes. These are used as fasteners in shoes and gloves. 1.2
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  • Slide 31 of 27 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall > Chemistry Materials This story illustrates two ways of looking at the worldthe macroscopic view and the microscopic view. Burrs belong to the macroscopic world, the world of objects that are large enough to see with the unaided eye. The hooks belong to the microscopic world, or the world of objects that can be seen only under magnification. 1.2
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  • Slide 32 of 27 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall > Chemistry Energy Chemists play an essential role in finding ways to conserve energy, produce energy, and store energy. 1.2
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  • Slide 33 of 27 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall > Chemistry Energy Conservation One of the easiest ways to conserve energy is through insulation. Insulation acts as a barrier to heat flow from the inside to the outside of a house or from the outside to the inside of a freezer. 1.2
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  • Slide 34 of 27 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall > Chemistry Energy SEAgel is a modern insulation that is light enough to float on soap bubbles. 1.2
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  • Slide 35 of 27 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall > Chemistry Energy Production The burning of coal, petroleum, and natural gas is a major source of energy. These materials are called fossil fuels. Oil from the soybeans is used to make biodiesel. 1.2
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  • Slide 36 of 27 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall > Chemistry Energy Storage Batteries are devices that use chemicals to store energy that will be released as electric current. For some applications, it important to have batteries that can be recharged rather than thrown away. Digital cameras, wireless phones, and laptop computers use rechargeable batteries. 1.2
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  • Slide 37 of 27 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall > Chemistry Medicine and Biotechnology Chemistry supplies the medicines, materials, and technology that doctors use to treat their patients. 1.2
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  • Slide 38 of 27 Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall > Chemistry Medicine and Biotechnology Medicines There are over 2000 prescription drugs. Many drugs are effective because they interact in a specific way with chemicals in cells. Knowledge of

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