project details, premiere recap, source monitor overview and camera angles

Download Project details, Premiere recap, Source Monitor overview and Camera Angles

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 PSA Definition:  Announcement on television or radio serving the public interest and run by the media at no charge. For example, a utility company might do a series of PSA’s on the subject of saving energy in the home. Each one would feature the company’s name.  PSA is a short film or video recording presented by a nonprofit organization which attempts to persuade the audience to take some specific action or adopt a favorable view towards some service, institution, issue, or cause.

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Project details, Premiere recap, Source Monitor overview and Camera Angles PSA Guidelines Setting up your Folders Source Monitor Mark-In Mark-Out The Fourth Wall Camera Angles High Shot Low Shot Canted Angle Rule of Thirds Leadroom Noseroom Headroom Pan Tilt Zoom PSA Definition: Announcement on television or radio serving the public interest and run by the media at no charge. For example, a utility company might do a series of PSAs on the subject of saving energy in the home. Each one would feature the companys name. PSA is a short film or video recording presented by a nonprofit organization which attempts to persuade the audience to take some specific action or adopt a favorable view towards some service, institution, issue, or cause. The importance of saving water. Why your public library is a valuable resource. Supporting your military troops. Texting and driving. The importance of voting. You will work in teams of four. You must determine what concept you want to tackle, and write a script or storyboard. When I approve your plan, you will then be lent a camcorder or camera to shoot footage for your project. Plan to occasionally have to come after school for footage camera supplies are limited. Locate your Class Period Number folder in /Documents Open the correct folder for your class period You always want to keep your files organized, so were going to create a folder for your specific project. Our new project goes right here Assets All media involved in making your video Pictures Raw video Music Output The final file(s), when done, goes here Project File The Premiere file goes here Premiere also makes Preview Files and Auto-Saves which you want to all stay in the same place. Its why your project file stays isolated. Click New Project Click Browse to specify that were putting it inside our new folder. (In this case, p5/YourName/Public Service Announcement/Project File) Name your project (Untitled is a really bad idea) and click OK All of our cameras and camcorders are set to record in AVCHD format, 720p, 60fps. Naturally, our first sequence (timeline) should match. You have had enough hands-on experience with USING Premiere in the last three weeks that I dont need a step-by-step set of instructions. However, there is something useful I want to make sure you know: Demonstration of Mark-In, Mark-Out Additionally, there are some filming concepts you should take into consideration for your PSA. Fourth Wall Camera Angles Leadroom/Noseroom/Headroom Rule of Thirds Pan/Tilt/Zoom The ultimate goal is to convince the audience that the camera does not exist. In order to establish this fourth wall, as its called, you need to be able to shoot from multiple angles without making the audience aware that theyre looking through a camera. The fourth wall is the invisible wall that separates reality from your creation. A high angle shows the subject from above Shows subject from above Camera is angled down Makes subject Less powerful Less significant Submissive James Bond movies actually use this shot often. Bond will be under pressure, via gunfire, and it makes him seem powerless until he gazes up and fires at the villain, equalizing the power struggle between them. Shows subject from above Camera is angled down Makes subject less powerful Less Significant Submissive Camera is low and pointed up Subject is: More Powerful Dominant Eyes of the Camera have been overcome by the subject Tarantinos movies are a classic example of using the trunk shot which is a low angle shot to show one character has triumphed over another. (Usually, in Tarantinos world, right before they close the trunk of the car or get murdered) The camera is purposely tilted to one side so the horizon is on an angle. This creates an interesting and dramatic effect. Dutch tilts are also popular in MTV-style video production, where unusual angles and lots of camera movement play a big part. Slumdog Millionaire uses this shot excessively to show how this world is unfamiliar to us and that something is upset in its depiction. When it comes to shot composition, the Rule of Thirds is one of the most useful and abuse-able tactics to make interesting shots. The Rule of Thirds can be summarized thusly: Completely centered shots tend to be boring Divide your shot into 9 panels using two horizontal and two vertical lines. These lines divide your shot into horizontal and vertical thirds as guides for you compose your shots with. In this picture, the girls right eye falls on an intersection of these imaginary lines youre using to compose your shot. This is called a crash point and things that fall on crash points tend to be a bit more psychologically interesting to look at as a result. This shot uses the division of the areas to its advantage. Instead of focusing on crash points, the weight of the photo is in the right third of the shot, which is intentionally where the building is closest to the camera. This causes your focus to first start at the closest section, and then scan the rest of the image. Leadroom is based off the Rule of Thirds, but accommodates movement. Psychologically, if your subject is moving to the left, but he/she is in the left third of the frame, the viewer will become aware of the fourth wall because theyre worried theyre going to bump into the edge of the shot, or that if something comes from off-camera moving left to right, hell bump straight into it. Like leadroom, headroom works much the same way except instead of left to right, were working with up and down positioning. Psychologically, the shot becomes distracting to viewers if the subjects head has run off the top of the shot. While sometimes unavoidable, it depends on how much of the subject is in the shot. For close-ups and Extreme Closeups, you dont worry about headroom and instead place focus on crash points for composition. For mid shots, you ought to have headroom! Pan: The framing moves left & right, with no vertical movement. Tilt: The framing moves up & down, with no horizontal movement. Zoom: In & out, appearing as if the camera is moving closer to or further away from the subject. There is a difference between zooming and moving the camera in and out. When a shot zooms in closer to the subject, it is said to be getting "tighter". As the shot zooms out, it is getting "looser". Follow: Any sort of shot when you are holding the camera (or have it mounted on your shoulder), and you follow the action whilst walking. Hard to keep steady, but very effective when done well.