presence in distance: the lived experience of adult the essential themes which characterize the...

Download PRESENCE IN DISTANCE: THE LIVED EXPERIENCE OF ADULT the essential themes which characterize the phenomenon;

If you can't read please download the document

Post on 11-Aug-2020

0 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  •    

    PRESENCE IN DISTANCE:  THE LIVED EXPERIENCE OF ADULT FAITH FORMATION 

    IN AN ONLINE LEARNING COMMUNITY     

    Marianne Evans Mount     

    Dissertation submitted to the faculty of the  Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University 

    in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of   

      Doctor of Philosophy 

    in  Human Development 

           

    Professor Marcie Boucouvalas, Chair  Professor Francine H. Hultgren, Co‐Chair 

    Dr. Clare Klunk  Dr. Paul Renard 

    Professor Michael Grahame Moore     

    March 19, 2008  Falls Church, Virginia 

      Keywords: presence, computer‐mediated education, online learning community, 

    distance education, adult spirituality, faith formation.     

    Copyright 2008, Marianne Evans Mount     

  • PRESENCE IN DISTANCE:  THE LIVED EXPERIENCE OF ADULT FAITH FORMATION 

    IN AN ONLINE LEARNING COMMUNITY  Marianne Evans Mount 

    (ABSTRACT)    The purpose of this hermeneutic phenomenological study was to better understand the  ways that adult learners studying Catholic theology become present to one another,  strengthen bonds of community, and contemplate the face of Christ in computer‐ mediated, text‐based distance education. Ten geographically dispersed learners seeking  undergraduate or graduate degrees in Catholic theology participated in the study.  There was no face‐to‐face interaction.      Through a password protected site specifically designed for the research, participants  engaged in eight weeks of text‐based, online conversation. They reflected on emergent  themes about technology and the ways that it alters time, place, presentation of self, and  relationships. Text as sacred, relational, presentational, communal, and  transformational was explored, as was the nature and meaning of community,  especially the spiritual quest to contemplate the face of Christ in an online community.  The study offers a deep understanding of the meaning of presence and the development  of community in the context of faith.        Serving as the philosophical methodological foundation were the writings of Martin  Heidegger (1927/1993), Hans‐Georg Gadamer (1960/1999), Gabriel Marcel (1937/1967),  John Paul II as Cardinal Carol Wojtyla (1976), and Robert Sokolowski (1993). The  phenomenological method of Max van Manen (2003) guided data collection and  analysis through the dynamic interplay of six research activities: (a) turning to the  phenomenon which seriously interests us and commits us to the world; (b)  investigating experience as we live it rather than as we conceptualize it; (c) reflecting on  the essential themes which characterize the phenomenon; (d) describing the  phenomenon through the art of writing and rewriting; (e) maintaining a strong and  oriented pedagogical relation to the phenomenon; (f) balancing the research context by  considering parts and whole.       Recommendations for practitioners of computer‐mediated education are explored;  suggestions for future research include longitudinal studies of theology students in  fully online programs, ways of introducing transcendent presence in online learning  communities, how language bears on learning and presence, and the role of non‐text  based media and virtual environments on presence and the spiritual quest.  

  • iii

                 

    We are writing this so our joy may be complete.  (New Testament and the Psalms, 2006, 1 John: 4) 

                 

    Understand this well: there is something holy, something divine hidden in the most ordinary  situations, and it is up to each one of you to discover it. 

    (St. Josemaria Escriva, 1967/2002, Passionately Loving the World)                 

    Domine, ut videam.  (Handbook of Prayers, 2001, p. 548) 

  • iv

    DEDICATION   

    It is God who said, ‘let light shine out of darkness,’ that has shone into our hearts to  enlighten them with the knowledge of God’s glory, the glory on the face of Christ. 

    (The New Jerusalem Bible, 1985, 2CO: 4:6)       

    This work is dedicated to:   

    John Paul II   (1920 – 2005) 

       Pope, Priest, Phenomenologist 

    whose text taught me a way of seeing   that reveals the mystery of God 

     in the   lived experience of the human face 

     of Christ.     

    “Ultimately, the mystery of language brings us back to the inscrutable mystery of God  himself.”  

    (John Paul II, Gift and Mystery, 1996, p. 7)       

    And to    

    Bishop Thomas J. Welsh, D.D., J.C.D.   

    Bishop, Founder, Teacher, and Father   

    Who makes the face of Christ present,    

    And shepherds me with love.     

  • v

    ACKNOWLEDGMENTS   

    I wish to thank my mother and father, Helen and Jack Jones, who were the first to  welcome me into a community and instilled a love of learning and a passion for  education. I thank my mother for handing on her most precious gift of faith in God and  for her fervent prayers offered hourly for my work. I thank my Dad for his  encouragement and admiration.    I thank my children, Muffy and Nat, my son‐in‐law, Daniel, my grandchildren, Maris  and Charlie, my stepchildren and grandchildren in Ohio, who have all supported me by  sacrificing the irreplaceable and irrepressible joys of family life together.     I thank my colleagues at The Catholic Distance University, for assuming heavier  burdens to free me to complete this work. I have been richly fed in the bonds of this  spiritual and intellectual community that supports me by their prayers, faith, wisdom,  caring, and affection.     I thank Bishop Paul S. Loverde, Chairman of the Board and President of The Catholic  Distance University, who is my Superior and my Bishop, for generously granting me  the time to complete this work.     My deepest gratitude goes to the following scholars and mentors, the members of my  Dissertation Committee, whom God so generously placed in the path of my life, and  whose self‐giving has cleared a path for me:  

      ‐‐Professor Michael Grahame Moore, a mentor and friend who planted in me  the seed of doctoral studies and whose theory of transactional distance  welcomed me into the home of being a distance educator, inspiring me to see in  the truth of his theory the truth of transformation in all education as the lived  experience of the relationship between presence and distance.       ‐‐Professor Marcie Boucouvalas, my Advisor and Chair, who taught me by  example that scholarship and service reveal the authentic community of teacher  and learner. I thank her for her wisdom in knowing me in ways that I did not  know myself by leading me to phenomenology and welcoming me into my own  way of being in the world.     ‐‐Professor Francine Hultgren, my research professor and Co‐Chair, a  phenomenologist who teaches by nurturing and selflessly dwells in the   pedagogical relationship of mother and child, dwelling in the presence of our 

  • vi

    text with amazement, and offering her self in the richness of her text.  I thank her  for opening me to a world of scholars and philosophers whose vision helped me  see the world in a new way, and to a method of research that invited me home.      ‐‐Dr. Clare Klunk, a teacher and friend who taught me take the journey by  following my own areas of interest in theology and spirituality. Her generosity in  time and availability, her skills in scholarship hidden in the joy of her humanity,  have filled me with hope and delight.       ‐‐Dr. Paul Renard, a dear friend and colleague, whose intellectual skills, energy,  and hard work, are matched only by his generosity in always putting others first.  He has been a mentor and example, a listener and cheerleader, since I  providentially chose a seat next to him in our first class together in 2003. He has  been a community to me.     ‐‐Professor Kenneth Schmitz, renowned scholar, philosopher, phenomenologist,  and teacher, who welcomed me as an external student, offering his scholarship to  explore my interests in computer‐mediated education and catechetics. He took  on my burden and entered into the conversation of my journey, always  encouraging me with great gentility and generosity. Despite the vast disparity  between teacher and student, he made me feel at home in our faith, in a  phenomenological understanding of

Recommended

View more >