oecd ecec network

Click here to load reader

Download OECD ECEC Network

Post on 03-Jan-2016

27 views

Category:

Documents

1 download

Embed Size (px)

DESCRIPTION

OECD ECEC Network. Catherine Hynes Department of Education and Science, Ireland. Country Profile. Republic of Ireland: Population : 4.23m (April 2006) Land Area : 68,890 sq km N umber of children birth to six: 418,612 (10 % of population) Rising birth rate + 16% approx since 2006 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

TRANSCRIPT

  • OECD ECEC NetworkCatherine HynesDepartment of Education and Science, Ireland

  • Country Profile

    Republic of Ireland: Population: 4.23m (April 2006)Land Area: 68,890 sq km Number of children birth to six: 418,612 (10 % of population)Rising birth rate + 16% approx since 2006Unemployment: 13.2% in 1990 4.3% in 2006 5.9% in 2008 12.5% Nov 2009 Female labour force participation rate: 1985: 30% 2006: 59.39% Apr-Jun 09: 54% (source: CSO)

  • Structures- DESMain legislative basis 1998 Education ActSchool attendance mandatory for 6-16 year olds. 45.5% of 4 year olds and 99% of 5 year olds are enrolled in junior infant classes in primary schools.Targeted interventions in areas of disadvantage and special needs Early Start programme
  • Structures OMCYA Childcare Directorate formerly part of Dept of Justice Equality and Law ReformMain Legislation 1991 Child Care ActECCE Sector not regulated until the 1996 Child Care (Pre-School Services) Regulation. Meant that pre-school services had to be inspected by the Health Board1996 regulations revoked by the Child Care (Pre-School Services) (No 2) Regulations 2006. The 2006 Regulations focus more on the childs learning, development and well-being

  • Since the 1990s1998 saw 2 major policy development consultation processes almost running in parallel. Education - The National Forum on Early Childhood Education March 1998 brought together all stakeholders in the ECCE sector in IrelandConsensus on the positive benefits to children, families and the wider society of high quality ECCE provision. National Forum Report, which ultimately led to the publication of Ready to Learn, the White Paper on Early Childhood Education (DES, 1999)Department of Justice, Equality and Law Reform established the Expert Working Group on Childcare main driver was Childcare Provision as a support to participation in the Labour forceResulted in the publication of the National Childcare Strategy (1999)Developments since then include the National Childrens Strategy 2000

  • Investment Since 2000The Equal Opportunities Childcare Programme 2000-2006Set up a network of 33 City and County Childcare Committees. Their job to develop a co-ordinated strategy for childcare provision within the county.to increase the supply of childcare services, facilities and childminders. Brought together all the stakeholders through the National Childcare Co-ordinating Committee

    Investment in InfrastructureAround 41,000 placesOver 500m expendedSuccessor Programme National Childcare Investment Programme 2006-2010

  • Split SystemHistorically, the care and education of a young child were seen as separate with care being a health responsibility

    Church influence on the autonomy of the family Pattern of workforce participation by mothers of young children Irelands split system has meantThe development of a separate physical infrastructure for pre-school services and school servicesSeparate legislative basisSeparate inspection systemSeparate qualification basisDevelopment of a caste system whereby the ECCE sector is low paid, without much status compared to the primary school systemDisconnect between the play based learning in pre-school services and the more formal curriculum of Junior and Senior InfantsDisconnect between the supports available for children with special needs

  • Irelands pattern of pre-school care and education

  • Split SystemHistorically, the care and education of a young child were seen as separate with care being a health responsibility

    Church influence on the autonomy of the family Pattern of workforce participation by mothers of young children Irelands split system has meantThe development of a separate physical infrastructure for pre-school services and school servicesSeparate legislative basisSeparate inspection systemSeparate qualification basisDevelopment of a caste system whereby the ECCE sector is low paid, without much status compared to the primary school systemDisconnect between the play based learning in pre-school services and the more formal curriculum of Junior and Senior InfantsDisconnect between the supports available for children with special needs

  • Evidence of integration The 1999 White Paper on Early Education, Ready to Learn, identified a key role for the Department in improving the quality of educational provision in childcare settings. It also set out the key tenet that the Department would support the growth of, rather than replace, the wide range of existing provision in the early childhood area

    Development of Practice Frameworks for 0-6 year olds in all settingsSolta, the National Quality Framework for Early Childhood Education (2006) developed by the CECDE- an agency of the Department of Education and Science Aistear, the Curriculum Framework for Early Learning (NCCA) 2009A Workforce Development Plan for the sector

  • *One Framework catering for three overlapping phasesAistear BabiesToddlersYoung children

  • Pre-school year from Jan 2010BackdropIreland is in the middle of a recession It is anticipated that unemployment will be at 13.75% in 2010Extensive savings sought on public expenditure

    Why introduce universal pre-school provision?To meet the 2002 Barcelona targetsTo deliver on Government commitments

    How is it being funded It is being funded by the scrapping of the Early Childcare Supplement (ECS) payment. A direct payment to parents 480m in 2008The ECS had been heavily criticised The OMCYA had argued strongly against the introduction of the ECS

  • Other reasonsThe belief that the ECCE sector was in crisis - children were being withdrawn from pre-school services as parents could no longer afford to pay for that serviceThe protection of jobs and the current investment within the sector

  • Employment Trend 1998 - 2008

  • ChallengesQuality of pre-school provisionEquality/Diversity within pre-school servicesSupport services for children with special needs The implementation of Solta and Aistear Professionalization of the sectorHow to bridge the care/education divide

  • *

View more