minnesota’s early intervention system

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Minnesota’s Early Intervention System. Created by Minnesota Region 10 IEIC Child Find/Outreach subcommittee in collaboration with Owatonna Public Schools. What is Early Intervention?. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Minnesotas Early Intervention System

Minnesotas Early Intervention SystemCreated by Minnesota Region 10 IEIC Child Find/Outreach subcommittee in collaboration with Owatonna Public SchoolsServices for children who may be experiencing delays in their development for several reasons including special health conditions Developmental evaluation to determine eligibilitySupports available:Connections to community services and programsWays a family can support their childs development at homeSpecial instruction and servicesSpecialists available:Early Childhood SpecialistsSpeech TherapyOccupational TherapyPhysical TherapySchool Psychologists

What is Early Intervention?Must meet state eligibility criteriaServes children ages birth kindergarten entranceServices are FREE to eligible familiesNo income requirementsNo immigrant status requirementsChildren can receive services in their home, child care setting or school

Early Intervention ServicesAn infant or toddler is eligible for early intervention services if the child meets one of the following criteria for Developmental Delay:

1. A delay of 1.5 standard deviations or more below the mean in at least one developmental area: - Cognitive Development - Physical Development - Communication - Social and Emotional Development - Adaptive Development

2. A diagnosed physical or mental condition or disorder that has a high probability of resulting in developmental delay, regardless of whether the child has demonstrated a need or delay. - Chromosomal/Genetic - Neuro-developmental - Prenatal/Perinatal conditions - Social/Emotional/Behavioral conditions A detailed list can be found on the Dept. of Health website at: http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/cfh/program/cyshn/earlyintro.cfm

Eligibility Criteria-Part CAge: Birth 2 years, 11 monthsAll areas of development are assessed regardless of referral concernsAn infant or toddler is also eligible for early intervention services if the child meets the criteria for any one of the special education disability categories (as defined in MN Administrative Rules):Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) Deaf-Blind Emotional or Behavioral Disorders Deaf and Hard of Hearing Developmental Cognitive Disability Other Health Disabilities Physically Impaired Severely Multiply Impaired Specific Learning Disability Speech or Language Impairments Visually Impaired Traumatic Brain Injury More information can be found at: http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/cfh/program/cyshn/earlyintro.cfm Eligibility Criteria-Part CContinuedYoung children ages 3 to kindergarten entrance are eligible for preschool special education services if the child meets one of the following criteria for Developmental Delay:

1. A delay of 1.5 standard deviations or more below the mean in at least two developmental areas: - Cognitive Development - Physical Development - Communication - Social and Emotional Development - Adaptive Development

2. A diagnosed physical or mental condition or disorder that has a high probability of resulting in developmental delay, and has an identified need for service. - Chromosomal/Genetic - Neuro-developmental - Prenatal/Perinatal conditions - Social/Emotional/Behavioral conditions A detailed list can be found on the Dept. of Health website at: http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/cfh/program/cyshn/earlyintro.cfm

Eligibility Criteria-Part BAge: 3 years kindergarten entranceOnly the developmental areas of suspected delay need to be assessedYoung children ages 3 through kindergarten entrance are also eligible for preschool special education services if the child has a disability (as defined by one of the categories listed below):Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) Deaf-Blind Emotional or Behavioral Disorders Deaf and Hard of Hearing Developmental Cognitive Disability Other Health Disabilities Physically Impaired Severely Multiply Impaired Speech or Language Impairments Visually Impaired Traumatic Brain Injury More information can be found at: http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/cfh/program/cyshn/earlyintro.cfm Eligibility Criteria-Part BContinuedCognitiveMotor (Gross and Fine Motor)Communication (Expressive and Receptive)AdaptiveSocial/EmotionalFive Areas of Development for Assessment Cognitive2 monthspays attention to faces; begins to follow things with eyes and recognize people at a distance

4 monthsresponds to affection; reaches for a toy with one hand; uses hands and eyes together (sees a toy and reaches for it); follows moving things with eyes; watches faces closely; recognizes familiar people and things at a distance6 monthslooks around at things nearby; brings things to mouth; shows curiosity about things and tries to get things that are out of reach; begins to pass things from one hand to the other

9 monthswatches the path of something as it falls; looks for things he sees you hide; plays peek-a-boo; puts things in her mouth; moves things smoothly from one hand to the other; picks up things like cereal Os between thumb and index finger12 monthsexplores things in different ways like shaking, banging, throwing; finds hidden things easily; looks at the right picture or thing when its named; copies gestures; starts to use things correctly (drinks from a cup, brushes hair); bangs two things together; puts things in a container and takes things out of a container; lets things go without help; pokes with index finger; follows simple directions like pick up the toy

2 yearsfinds things even when hidden under two or three covers; begins to sort shapes and colors; completes sentences and rhymes in familiar books; plays simple make-believe games; builds towers of 4 or more blocks; might use one hand more than the other; follows two-step directions such as pick up your shoes and put them in the closet.; names items in a picture book such as a cat, bird, dog.

3 yearscan work toys with buttons, levers and moving parts; plays make-believe with dolls, animals and people; does puzzles with 3 or 4 pieces; understands what two means; copies a circle with pencil or crayon; turns book pages one at a time; builds towers of more than 6 blocks; screws and unscrews jar lids or turns door handle

Center for Disease Control and Prevention as adapted from CARING FOR YOUR BABY AND YOUNG CHILD:BIRTH TO AGE 5, Fifth Edition, edited by Steven Shelov and Tanya Remer Altmann by the American Academy of Pediatrics and BRIGHT FUTURES: GUIDLEINES FOR HEALTH SUPERVISION OF INFANTS, CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS, 2008Third Edition, edited by Joseph Hagan, Jr., Judith S. Shaw and Paula M. Duncan,2008, Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics.

Motor2 monthscan hold head up and begins to push up when lying on tummy; makes smoother movements with arms and legs4 monthsholds head steady, unsupported; pushes down on legs when feet are on a hard surface; may be able to roll over from tummy to back; can hold a toy and shake it and swing a dangling toy; brings hands to mouth; when lying on stomach, pushes up to elbows 6 monthsrolls over in both directions (front to back and back to front); begins to sit without support; when standing, supports weight on legs and might bounce; rocks back and forth on hands/knees, sometimes crawling backward before moving forward9 monthsstands, holding on; can get into sitting position; sits without support; pulls to stand; crawls12 monthsgets to a sitting position without help; pulls up to stand, walks holding on to furniture; takes a few steps without holding on; may stand alone2 yearsstands on tiptoe; kicks a ball; begins to run; climbs onto and down from furniture without help; walks up and down stairs holding on; throws ball overhand; makes or copies straight lines and circles3 yearsclimbs well; runs easily; pedals a tricycle; walks up and down stairs, one foot on each stepCenter for Disease Control and Prevention as adapted from CARING FOR YOUR BABY AND YOUNG CHILD:BIRTH TO AGE 5, Fifth Edition, edited by Steven Shelov and Tanya Remer Altmann by the American Academy of Pediatrics and BRIGHT FUTURES: GUIDLEINES FOR HEALTH SUPERVISION OF INFANTS, CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS, 2008Third Edition, edited by Joseph Hagan, Jr., Judith S. Shaw and Paula M. Duncan,2008, Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics. Center for Disease Control and Prevention as adapted from CARING FOR YOUR BABY AND YOUNG CHILD:BIRTH TO AGE 5, Fifth Edition, edited by Steven Shelov and Tanya Remer Altmann by the American Academy of Pediatrics and BRIGHT FUTURES: GUIDLEINES FOR HEALTH SUPERVISION OF INFANTS, CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS, 2008Third Edition, edited by Joseph Hagan, Jr., Judith S. Shaw and Paula M. Duncan,2008, Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics.

Communication2 monthscoos; makes gurgling sounds; turns head toward sounds4 monthshas different cries for hunger, pain, being tired; vocalizes with expression; uses varied vowel sounds 6 monthsbegins to say consonant sounds; takes turns making sounds; makes sounds to show joy and displeasure9 monthsunderstands no; uses consonant/vowel combinations (mamama, bababa); copies sounds and gestures of others; begins using fingers to point at things12 monthsresponds to simple requests; uses simple gestures (shakes head, waves); says mama and dada; tries to say words that others say2 yearspoints to things/pictures when they are named; says sentences with 2-4 words; follows simple instructions; uses 50 intelligible words by 2 yrs. old, uses 200 intelligible words by 2 yrs. old 3 yearscan name most familiar things; follows instructions with 2 or 3 steps; uses pronouns and some plurals; talks well enough for strangers to understand most of the time; carries on conversations using 2-3 sentences, uses 300 intelligible words by 3 yrs. old Adaptive2 monthsopens/closes m

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