message from the president by peter f. hess president@awma...

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4 em july 2006 awma.org em message from the president ADVERTISING Celine Rihn Sales Coordinator 1-412-232-3444, ext. 3104 [email protected] EDITORIAL Andy Knopes Editor Lisa Bucher Managing Editor EDITORIAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE Susan S.G. Wierman, Chair Mid-Atlantic Regional Air Management Association Todd M. Tamura, QEP, Vice Chair Tamura Environmental John D. Bachmann U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Donald L. Blumenthal, Ph.D. Sonoma Technology Inc. Patricia A. Brush Bechtel Corp. Judith C. Chow Desert Research Institute Prabhu Dayal, Ph.D., P.E. C Trade Gwen Eklund Consultant Gary Gasperino U.S. Navy Jill Barson Gilbert, QEP Lexicon Systems Gale F. Hoffnagle, CCM, QEP TRC Environmental Corp. Gary Kendall Bay Area Air Quality Management District John D. Kinsman Edison Electric Institute Ashok Kumar University of Toledo Julian A Levy, Jr. Levy Environmental Consulting C.V. Mathai, Ph.D., QEP Pinnacle West/APS Ann McIver, QEP Citizens Thermal Energy S.T. Rao U.S. Environmental Protection Agency John G. Watson, Ph.D. Desert Research Institute PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE Wayne T. Davis, Chair University of Tennessee Judith C. Chow, Vice Chair Desert Research Institute A&WMA HEADQUARTERS Adrianne Carolla, CAE Executive Director Air & Waste Management Association One Gateway Center, 3rd Floor 420 Fort Duquesne Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA 15222-1435 1-412-232-3444; 412-232-3450 (fax) [email protected] by Peter F. Hess [email protected] em www.awma.org W hile listening to the speakers at a recent conference for federal, state, and local regulatory officials, the saying “Think globally, act locally” came to mind. I was impressed with the example set by several local regulatory agencies (in some cases, very small organizations) to address seemingly mega issues. I take pleasure in seeing a small group take the lead on national or international issues—in part because I see it happen within A&WMA, where many small groups face large challenges. I am speaking, of course, of the local member units called Sections and Chapters. I call the work of the Sections and Chapters “heavy lifting” because these small groups take on very large tasks and are the backbone of this Association. When did A&WMA’s Sections and Chapters come into existence, and why? What was to be- come the first regional section of the then-Air Pollution Control Association (APCA) started out in 1948 as an ad hoc conference of air pollution control officials in Cincinnati. Two years later, the ad hoc conference disbanded and its members formed the East Central Section of APCA. With the advent of the 1970 Clean Air Act, the Association’s Board of Directors realized the need to have the local Sections address the complex issues that were unique to each region. The Sections and Chap- ters (the Association’s network of regional Sections later expanded to include subdivisions, called Chapters, the first of which were formed in 1978) rose to the challenge and have now become the vehicle for the dissemination of information at the local level. Past President John S. Lagarias wrote in 1982 that the development of this Association “is unique in that it was an international organization from its inception and expanded downward into local Sections and Chapters—sort of like a flower that started in full bloom and then later began to put down roots” (see The Story of the Air Pollution Control Association: Seventy-Five Years of Growth; J. Air Poll. Control Assoc. 1982, 32 (1); 31-43). By 1982, the number of Sections and Chapters had grown to 19 Sections and 13 Chapters; today there are 32 Sections and 68 Chapters. Currently, Sections and Chapters conduct the majority of meetings offered by A&WMA and offer unrivaled opportunities for networking. I would venture to say that nearly every week of the year, one of the Sections or Chapters hosts a meeting, workshop, or networking event. These local meetings are unique in that they address the issues specific to the local geographical region. These meetings allow the attendees to understand the consequences of the complex national rules on their local operations. The dissemination of information and networking opportunities are not the only functions of Sections and Chapters. They are also untiring champions of A&WMA’s educational programs and provide an unparalleled number of educational scholarships granted under the A&WMA umbrella. Last year, Sections and Chapters granted more than US$250,000 worth of scholarships. I believe in leading by example, so one of the ways I have been sharing the goals of A&WMA in my role as president is by attending local Section and Chapter meetings across the country. I truly relish the opportunity to share my thoughts on how environmental stewardship relates to being a member of A&WMA, to meet new faces, and to reestablish friendships with members, some of whom I have known for more than 30 years. Environmental stewardship can be most effective at the local level. As members of A&WMA, you each belong to a local Section or Chapter. If you haven’t attended a meeting of your local group recently, I encourage you to check it out. There are many challenges facing us as part of the environmental regulated, regulatory, academic, or consulting community. When looking for solu- tions to these challenges, please remember the saying “Think globally, act locally,” and participate in local A&WMA activities to become a strong voice for environmental stewardship. Sections & Chapters: Pursuing Local Solutions to Global Issues If you are interested in having the A&WMA President attend an upcoming Section or Chapter meeting, or if you are keen to learn more about becoming more active in your local Section or Chapter, contact Karen Houlihan, Section and Chapter Relations Coordinator, at [email protected]. Copyright 2006 Air & Waste Management Association

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Page 1: message from the president by Peter F. Hess president@awma ...pubs.awma.org/gsearch/em/2006/7/presmessage.pdf · Andy Knopes Editor Lisa Bucher Managing Editor EDITORIAL ADVISORY

4 em july 2006 awma.org

emmessage from the president

ADVERTISING

Celine RihnSales Coordinator1-412-232-3444, ext. [email protected]

EDITORIAL

Andy KnopesEditor

Lisa BucherManaging Editor

EDITORIAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Susan S.G. Wierman, ChairMid-Atlantic Regional Air Management Association

Todd M. Tamura, QEP, Vice ChairTamura Environmental

John D. BachmannU.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Donald L. Blumenthal, Ph.D.Sonoma Technology Inc.

Patricia A. BrushBechtel Corp.

Judith C. ChowDesert Research Institute

Prabhu Dayal, Ph.D., P.E.C Trade

Gwen EklundConsultant

Gary GasperinoU.S. Navy

Jill Barson Gilbert, QEPLexicon Systems

Gale F. Hoffnagle, CCM, QEPTRC Environmental Corp.

Gary KendallBay Area Air Quality Management District

John D. KinsmanEdison Electric Institute

Ashok KumarUniversity of Toledo

Julian A Levy, Jr.Levy Environmental Consulting

C.V. Mathai, Ph.D., QEPPinnacle West/APS

Ann McIver, QEPCitizens Thermal Energy

S.T. RaoU.S. Environmental Protection Agency

John G. Watson, Ph.D.Desert Research Institute

PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE

Wayne T. Davis, ChairUniversity of Tennessee

Judith C. Chow, Vice ChairDesert Research Institute

A&WMA HEADQUARTERS

Adrianne Carolla, CAEExecutive Director

Air & Waste Management AssociationOne Gateway Center, 3rd Floor420 Fort Duquesne Blvd.Pittsburgh, PA 15222-14351-412-232-3444; 412-232-3450 (fax)[email protected]

by Peter F. [email protected]

emwww.awma.org

W hile listening to the speakers at a recent conference for federal, state, and local regulatoryofficials, the saying “Think globally, act locally” came to mind. I was impressed with theexample set by several local regulatory agencies (in some cases, very small organizations)

to address seemingly mega issues. I take pleasure in seeing a small group take the lead on nationalor international issues—in part because I see it happen within A&WMA, where many small groupsface large challenges. I am speaking, of course, of the local member units called Sections andChapters. I call the work of the Sections and Chapters “heavy lifting” because these small groupstake on very large tasks and are the backbone of this Association.

When did A&WMA’s Sections and Chapters come into existence, and why? What was to be-come the first regional section of the then-Air Pollution Control Association (APCA) started out in1948 as an ad hoc conference of air pollution control officials in Cincinnati. Two years later, the adhoc conference disbanded and its members formed the East Central Section of APCA. With theadvent of the 1970 Clean Air Act, the Association’s Board of Directors realized the need to have thelocal Sections address the complex issues that were unique to each region. The Sections and Chap-ters (the Association’s network of regional Sections later expanded to include subdivisions, calledChapters, the first of which were formed in 1978) rose to the challenge and have now become thevehicle for the dissemination of information at the local level.

Past President John S. Lagarias wrote in 1982 that the development of this Association “is uniquein that it was an international organization from its inception and expanded downward into localSections and Chapters—sort of like a flower that started in full bloom and then later began to putdown roots” (see The Story of the Air Pollution Control Association: Seventy-Five Years of Growth;J. Air Poll. Control Assoc. 1982, 32 (1); 31-43). By 1982, the number of Sections and Chapters hadgrown to 19 Sections and 13 Chapters; today there are 32 Sections and 68 Chapters.

Currently, Sections and Chapters conduct the majority of meetings offered by A&WMA andoffer unrivaled opportunities for networking. I would venture to say that nearly every week of theyear, one of the Sections or Chapters hosts a meeting, workshop, or networking event. These localmeetings are unique in that they address the issues specific to the local geographical region. Thesemeetings allow the attendees to understand the consequences of the complex national rules ontheir local operations.

The dissemination of information and networking opportunities are not the only functions ofSections and Chapters. They are also untiring champions of A&WMA’s educational programs andprovide an unparalleled number of educational scholarships granted under the A&WMA umbrella.Last year, Sections and Chapters granted more than US$250,000 worth of scholarships.

I believe in leading by example, so one of the ways I have been sharing the goals of A&WMA inmy role as president is by attending local Section and Chapter meetings across the country. I trulyrelish the opportunity to share my thoughts on how environmental stewardship relates to being amember of A&WMA, to meet new faces, and to reestablish friendships with members, some ofwhom I have known for more than 30 years.

Environmental stewardship can be most effective at the local level. As members of A&WMA,you each belong to a local Section or Chapter. If you haven’t attended a meeting of your localgroup recently, I encourage you to check it out. There are many challenges facing us as part of theenvironmental regulated, regulatory, academic, or consulting community. When looking for solu-tions to these challenges, please remember the saying “Think globally, act locally,” and participatein local A&WMA activities to become a strong voice for environmental stewardship.

Sections & Chapters:Pursuing Local Solutions to Global Issues

If you are interested in having the A&WMA President attend an upcoming Section or Chapter meeting, orif you are keen to learn more about becoming more active in your local Section or Chapter, contact KarenHoulihan, Section and Chapter Relations Coordinator, at [email protected].

Copyright 2006 Air & Waste Management Association

Page 2: message from the president by Peter F. Hess president@awma ...pubs.awma.org/gsearch/em/2006/7/presmessage.pdf · Andy Knopes Editor Lisa Bucher Managing Editor EDITORIAL ADVISORY

6 em july 2006 awma.org

Message du Président en français

En écoutant les conférenciers lors d’une récenteconférence pour les agents fédéraux, provinciaux etlocaux chargés de la réglementation, l’adage “Penserglobalement, agir localement” m’est venu à l’esprit. J’aiété impressionné par l’exemple que donnent plusieursorganismes de réglementation locaux (dans certainscas, de très petits organismes) en abordant desproblèmes apparemment gigantesques. J’ai eu duplaisir à voir un petit groupe mener des problèmesnationaux ou internationaux, en partie parce que j’aiconstaté cela au sein de l’A&WMA, là où beaucoupde petits groupes font face à de gros défis. Je parle,bien entendu, des groupes de membres locaux appelésSections et Chapitres. J’appelle le travail des Sectionset des Chapitres les’“gros travaux” parce que ces petitsgroupes prennent sur leurs épaules de très grossestâches et qu’ils sont la pierre angulaire de cette Asso-ciation.

Quand les Sections et les Chapitres de l’A&WMAont-ils fait leur apparition, et pourquoi? Ce qui devaitdevenir la première section régionale de cette asso-ciation, alors appelée la Air Pollution Control Asso-ciation (APCA), a vu le jour en 1948 en tant queconférence spéciale sur les agents de contrôle de lapollution atmosphérique à Cincinnati. Deux ans plustard, la conférence spéciale s’est démembrée et sesmembres ont formé la East Central Section de l’APCA.Avec l’avènement du Clean Air Act en 1970, le Conseild’administration de l’Association a réalisé le besoinqu’il y ait des Sections locales pour aborder lesproblèmes complexes uniques à chaque région. LesSections et les Chapitres (le réseau des Sectionsrégionales de l’Association s’est plus tard élargi afind’inclure des sous-sections appelées Chapitres, le pre-mier ayant été formé en 1978) se sont attaqués au

Sections et Chapitres: Rechercher des solutions locales aux problèmes mondiauxdéfi et sont maintenant devenus le véhicule pour ladissémination de renseignements à l’échelle locale.

L’ancien président John S. Lagarias a écrit en 1982que le développement de cette Association “est uniqueen ce sens que c’est un organisme international depuisses débuts et qu’il s’est ensuite agrandi pour formerles Sections et Chapitres locaux, un peu à la manièred’une fleur qui commence en pleine floraison et qui,plus tard, commence à s’enraciner” (voir The Storyof the Air Pollution Control Association: Seventy-FiveYears of Growth;”J. Air Poll. Control Assoc. 1982, 32 (1);31-43). En 1982, le nombre de Sections et de Chapitresavait augmenté à 19 Sections et 13 Chapitres.Aujourd’hui, on compte 32 Sections et 68 Chapitres.

Présentement, les Sections et les Chapitrestiennent la plupart des réunions offertes parl’A&WMA et offrent des occasions uniques deréseautage. Je m’aventure même à dire qu’à presquetoutes les semaines de l’année, une des Sections ouun des Chapitres anime une réunion, un atelier ouune activité de réseautage. Ces réunions locales sontuniques en ce sens qu’elles abordent les problèmesspécifiques à la région géographique locale. Cesréunions permettent aux participants de comprendreles conséquences des règlements nationaux complexesrégissant leurs activités locales.

La dissémination de renseignements ainsi que lesoccasions de réseautage ne sont pas les seules fonctionsdes Sections et des Chapitres. Ce sont aussi des cham-pions infatigables des programmes de formation del’A&WMA et ils fournissent un nombre inégalé debourses d’études accordées sous le chapeau del’A&WMA. L’année passée, les Sections et les Chapitresont accordé des bourses d’études d’une valeur de plusde 250,000 $USD.

Mensaje del Presidente en español

Secciones y Capítulos: Pasando de soluciones locales a asuntos globalesMientras escuchaba a los ponentes en unaconferencia reciente para funcionarios federales,estatales y locales de normatividad, el dicho “Piensaglobalmente, actúa localmente” vino a mi mente.Estaba impresionado por alguno de los ejemplos dealgunas agencias normativas locales (en algunoscasos, organizaciones muy pequeñas) para abordaraparentemente asuntos muy grandes. Disfrutéobservando a un pequeño grupo tomar la iniciativaen asuntos nacionales e internacionales—en parteporque veo que eso sucede dentro de A&WMA,donde muchos grupos pequeños enfrentan grandesretos. Estoy hablando, desde luego, de nuestrasunidades locales llamadas Secciones y Capítulos. Altrabajo que realizan las Secciones y los Capítulos lollamo “levantamiento pesado” porque esos pequeñosgrupos asumen tareas muy grandes y son la columnavertebral de esta Asociación.

¿Cuándo comenzaron a existir los Capítulos ySecciones y por qué? Cual se convirtió en la primerasección regional de la entonces Asociación de Con-trol de Contaminación Atmosférica (APCA) quecomenzó en 1948 como una conferencia ad hoc defuncionarios para el control de la contaminación delaire en Cincinnati. Dos años después, la conferenciaad hoc se disolvió y sus miembros formaron laSección Central del Este de APCA. Con lapublicación del Acta de Aire limpio en 1970, elConsejo de Directores de la Asociación se dio cuentade la necesidad de que Secciones locales se enfocaranen los complejos asuntos que fueran únicos de cadaregión. Las Secciones y Capítulos (la red de Seccionesregionales que más tarde se expandieron e hicieron

subdivisiones llamadas Capítulos, el primero de loscuales se fundó en 1978) asumieron el reto y ahorase han convertido en el vehículo para la diseminacióne información a nivel local.

El anterior Presidente John S. Lagarias escribióen 1982 que el desarrollo de esta Asociación “es únicaen cuanto a su organización interna desde el inicio yexpansión en Secciones y Capítulos locales—comouna flor que comienza a abrirse y más tarde hecharaíces” (ver La Historia de la Asociación de Controlde Contaminación del Aire: Setenta y cinco años deCrecimiento; J. Air Poll. Control Assoc. 1982, 32 (1);31-43). En 1982 el número de Secciones y Capítuloshabía crecido a 19 Secciones y 13 Capítulos, a la fechason 32 Secciones y 68 Capítulos.

Actualmente, las Secciones y Capítulos conducenla mayor parte de las reuniones que organizaA&WMA y ofrece oportunidades inigualables en laformación de redes. Me aventuraría a decir que casicada semana del año una de las Secciones o Capítulostiene una reunión, taller o eventos de enlace. Estoseventos locales son únicos y abordan temasespecíficos a las regions geográficas locales. Estasreuniones permiten a los participantes comprenderlas consecuencias de las complejas reglas nacionalesen sus operaciones locales.

La difusión de la información y lasoportunidades de conectarse no son las únicasfunciones de las Secciones y Capítulos. Han formadoa los campeones de los programas educativos yprovisto de un número sin paralelo de becas bajo elparaguas de A&WMA. El año pasado, las Secciones yCapítulos dieron más de US$250,000 en becas.

Spanish translation provided by Violeta Mugica,Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Azcapotzalco de México.

Creo en liderear con el ejemplo, por lo que unade las formas en que he estado compartiendo loslogros de A&WMA en mi papel como presidente, esasistiendo a las reuniones de las Secciones y Capítulosa lo largo del país. Realmente disfruto la oportunidadde compartir mis pensamientos de cómo el servicioambiental nos relaciona siendo miembros deA&WMA, conocemos nuevas caras, y nos restableceamistades con los miembros, algunos de los cualesnos hemos conocido por más de 30 años.

La coordinación ambiental puede ser másefectiva a nivel local. Como miembros de A&WMA,ustedes pertenecen a una Sección o Capítulo. Siustedes no han asistido a alguna reunión de sugrupo local recientemente, los invito a hacerlo. Haymuchos retos que enfrentar como parte de lacomunidad ambiental en cuanto a normatividad,academia o consultoría. Cuando busquensoluciones para dichos retos, por favor recuerdenel dicho “Piensa globalmente, actúa localmente” yparticipen en las actividades locales de A&WMApara convertirnos en una fuerte voz como servidoresambientales.

Je crois prêcher par l’exemple, donc une façonque j’ai utilisée pour partager les objectifs del’A&WMA dans mon rôle de président est d’assisteraux réunions des Sections et des Chapitres locaux àtravers le pays. Je prends vraiment plaisir à cette occa-sion de partager mes pensées sur la façon dont lagérance de l’environnement consiste à être un membrede l’A&WMA, à faire la connaissance de nouveaux vis-ages et à rétablir des relations avec des membres, dontje connais certains depuis plus de 30 ans.

La gérance de l’environnement peut être trèsefficace à l’échelle locale. En tant que membres del’A&WMA, vous appartenez tous à une Section ou àun Chapitre local. Si vous n’avez pas assisté récemmentà une réunion de votre groupe local, je vous encour-age à aller y jeter un coup d’œil. Il y a beaucoup dedéfis auxquels nous devons faire face parmi les comitésde réglementation généraux et sur l’environnement,les comités de consultations et les communautésuniversitaires. Lors de la recherche de solutions pources défis, rappelez-vous l’adage “Penser globalement,agir localement”, et participez aux activités locales del’A&WMA afin de devenir une voix solide pour lagérance de l’environnement.

French translation provided by the Canadian Councilfor Human Resources in the Environment Industry (CCHREI).

Si vous êtes intéressé par la présence du président del’A&WMA lors d’une prochaine réunion d’une Sec-tion ou d’un Chapitre, ou si vous êtes intéressé à enapprendre davantage sur la façon de devenir plus actifau sein de votre Section ou Chapitre local,communiquez avec Karen Houlihan, Coordonnatricedes relations des Sections et des Chapitres, [email protected].

Si están interesados en que el Presidente de A&WMAPresident asista a una reunion próxima de su Capítuloo Sección, o si están interesados en saber más sobrelas próximas actividades de su Sección o Capítulo,contacten a Karen Houlihan, Coordinadora de lasRelaciones con Secciones o Capítulos [email protected].

Copyright 2006 Air & Waste Management Association