Massachusetts Department of Elementary & Secondary Education Summer Bridge Program for Rising Grade 9 Students College & Career Readiness Webinar Series

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<ul><li> Slide 1 </li> <li> Massachusetts Department of Elementary &amp; Secondary Education Summer Bridge Program for Rising Grade 9 Students College &amp; Career Readiness Webinar Series April 14, 2015 </li> <li> Slide 2 </li> <li> Massachusetts Department of Elementary &amp; Secondary Education 2 Welcome! Please type your question or comment in the chat window at any point during the presentation All phones will be muted PowerPoint slides will be sent to all registered participants 2 </li> <li> Slide 3 </li> <li> Massachusetts Department of Elementary &amp; Secondary Education 3 Agenda Part I: Current state of grade 9 students in Massachusetts Part II: Research on 9 th grade Part III: Lawrence Public Schools 3 </li> <li> Slide 4 </li> <li> Massachusetts Department of Elementary &amp; Secondary Education Part I: Current State of Grade 9 Students in Massachusetts </li> <li> Slide 5 </li> <li> Massachusetts Department of Elementary &amp; Secondary Education 5 Following a cohort of 9 th graders entering in 2007 - 86% of those 9 th graders graduated high school in 5 years - 6 out of 10 9 th graders enrolled in college the fall after graduation - 5 out of 10 9 th graders persisted to the second year of college 5 </li> <li> Slide 6 </li> <li> Massachusetts Department of Elementary &amp; Secondary Education 6 Following a cohort of low income 9 th graders in 2007 - 75% of those 9 th graders graduated high school in 5 years - 4 out of 10 of those 9 th graders enrolled in college the fall after graduation - 3 out of 10 of those 9 th graders persisted to the second year of college 6 </li> <li> Slide 7 </li> <li> Massachusetts Department of Elementary &amp; Secondary Education 7 Nearly 1 in 10 first time 9 th graders are not promoted to 10 th grade 7 </li> <li> Slide 8 </li> <li> Massachusetts Department of Elementary &amp; Secondary Education 8 Across the state, over 20% of 9 th graders fail at least one course 8 Source: DART SAHSDART SAHS </li> <li> Slide 9 </li> <li> Massachusetts Department of Elementary &amp; Secondary Education For First Time 9 th Graders 2013-14 Course Passing 9 Group Total State Total Urban All Courses PassedNot All Courses Passed StateUrbanStateUrban White46,7085,81586.7%73.0%13.3%27.0% Hispanic11,6697,73261.5%54.0%38.5%46.0% Black/ Afr. Amer.6,1813,66566.6%62.9%33.4%37.1% Asian3,9271,54190.7%83.0%9.3%17.0% Low Income26,55914,04264.9%58.5%35.1%41.5% ELL4,5673,63255.6%51.8%44.4%48.2% Students w/disabilities11,2613,41767.3%52.1%32.7%47.9% High Needs31,29614,13468.4%59.7%31.6%40.3% </li> <li> Slide 10 </li> <li> Massachusetts Department of Elementary &amp; Secondary Education First Time 9 th Graders 2013-14 10 Course Name Number of Students Failing - State N=13,569 Algebra I (incl. Parts I and II)4,918 36.2% Geometry401 3.0% Biology2,507 18.5% ELA3,696 27.2% Physics1,032 7.6% World History1,874 13.8% US History1,502 11.1% Course Name Number of Students Failing - Urban N=6,925 Algebra I (incl. Parts I and II)2,87441.5% Geometry1862.7% Biology1,53822.2% ELA2,10430.4% Physics80611.6% World History1,09015.7% US History1,09915.9% </li> <li> Slide 11 </li> <li> Massachusetts Department of Elementary &amp; Secondary Education Using EWIS 11 The outcome indicator for EWIS for 7 th, 8 th and 9 th graders is risk of not passing all ninth grade coursework, this tool is ideal for helping to flag/identify students who may be in need of assistance. </li> <li> Slide 12 </li> <li> Massachusetts Department of Elementary &amp; Secondary Education 12 </li> <li> Slide 13 </li> <li> Massachusetts Department of Elementary &amp; Secondary Education First Time 9 th Graders 2012-13 and Drop Out 2013-14 13 Group State Number of Students Number of Dropouts Dropout Rate Students Passing All Courses55,3021520.3% Students Not Passing All Courses16,9037314.3% Group Urban Number of Students Number of Dropouts Dropout Rate Students Passing All Courses12,152760.6% Students Not Passing All Courses7,3884816.5% </li> <li> Slide 14 </li> <li> Massachusetts Department of Elementary &amp; Secondary Education First Time 9 th Graders 2012-13 MCAS Results (2013-14) 14 Group - State Number of Students 10 th Grade Tested ELA % Proficient or Advanced 10 th Grade Tested Math % Proficient or Advanced Students Passing All55,30253,35294.0%53,38886.5% Students Not Passing All16,90312,37779.5%12,39656.7% Group - Urban Number of Students 10 th Grade Tested ELA % Proficient or Advanced 10 th Grade Tested Math % Proficient or Advanced Students Passing All12,15211,42086.1%11,42674.9% Students Not Passing All7,3884,59966.3%4,62339.6% </li> <li> Slide 15 </li> <li> Massachusetts Department of Elementary &amp; Secondary Education Part II: Research on 9 th Grade </li> <li> Slide 16 </li> <li> Massachusetts Department of Elementary &amp; Secondary Education 16 Recent General Research Findings 9 th grade announces, and often defines, a schools commitment to equity and to preparing every student for life The messages students receive in 9 th grade, and the self-beliefs they adopt, can define their high school years High rates of 9 th grade academic course failures are more related to non-cognitive skills and behaviors than academic skill deficits 16 </li> <li> Slide 17 </li> <li> Massachusetts Department of Elementary &amp; Secondary Education 17 Recent Research Findings 9 th grade professional learning communities that meet regularly, review data, and collaborate on planning and teaching are essential 9 th grade performance is highly predictive of a students likelihood of graduating high school 9 th grade is either a gatekeeper to opportunity or springboard to success 17 </li> <li> Slide 18 </li> <li> Massachusetts Department of Elementary &amp; Secondary Education 18 9 th Grade as a Gatekeeper Assumption that students arrive ready for high school level work Belief that students know how to take advantage of the opportunities provided Perception that only some students are college material Courses, schedules, and curriculum built around teacher and institutional needs and desires 18 </li> <li> Slide 19 </li> <li> Massachusetts Department of Elementary &amp; Secondary Education 19 9 th Grade as a Gatekeeper Academic courses and support are separate and uncoordinated More resources are allocated to higher level courses and older students Teachers work in isolation 19 </li> <li> Slide 20 </li> <li> Massachusetts Department of Elementary &amp; Secondary Education 20 9 th Grade as a Springboard Assumption that all students need personalized support and attention Belief that teachers need to guide or coach students to make good choices Perception that all students can succeed academically and go onto post secondary education Courses, schedules, curriculum and instruction are built around student needs 20 </li> <li> Slide 21 </li> <li> Massachusetts Department of Elementary &amp; Secondary Education 21 9 th Grade as a Springboard Academic courses and support are deeply coordinated Adequate resources and staff are allocated to support incoming students Teachers collaborate regularly within the school day and with potential out of school (both space and time) opportunities 21 </li> <li> Slide 22 </li> <li> Massachusetts Department of Elementary &amp; Secondary Education 22 Summer Bridge Programming Many schools and districts throughout the country are creating summer bridge programs to: - Accelerate academic achievement - Mitigate summer learning loss - Strengthen preparation for high school They vary widely in design and purpose, ranging from: - 1-2 day orientations to high school - Rigorous, multi-week academic program Some districts specifically target students who are more likely to struggle in high school, while others have open-enrollment policies In many cases, districts fund and operate summer bridge programs, but others may be funded by grants and or operated in partnership with community organizations 22 </li> <li> Slide 23 </li> <li> Massachusetts Department of Elementary &amp; Secondary Education 23 Summer Bridge Programming: 8 High Impact Practices 1.Student data are used to identify students who are at greater risk of failing, dropping out, or struggling in high school and identified students are proactively targeted for participation 2.Student data are provided to teachers before the program begins, and teachers personalize instruction and supports 3.There is an intensive academic focus on the foundational reading, writing, math, and academic skills that are critical to success in high school and in all content areas 4.Courses and learning experiences are taught by experienced, skilled, and qualified teachersideally, the same teachers who will instruct program students when they enter ninth grade 23 </li> <li> Slide 24 </li> <li> Massachusetts Department of Elementary &amp; Secondary Education 24 Summer Bridge Programming: 8 High Impact Practices 5.The curriculum is based on clear learning goals and expectations that have been aligned with 9 th grade courses and standards 6.Teachers, counselors, and advisors embed social and emotional development into all learning experiences, and they help students prepare for the challenges they are likely to encounter in 9 th grade 7.The curriculum includes orientation activities for both students and families, assistance with study skills and organizational habits, and proactive postsecondary-planning guidance 8.Educators and support specialists intentionally build relationships between students and adultsspecifically, between students and the teachers, counselors, advisors, and mentors who will instruct and support students in 9 th grade 24 </li> <li> Slide 25 </li> <li> Massachusetts Department of Elementary &amp; Secondary Education 25 Research Resources and Tools Consortium for Chicago School Research What Matters for Staying On-Track and Graduating in Chicago Public High Schools: http://ccsr.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/publications/07%20 What%20Matters%20Final.pdf Great Schools Partnership Ninth Grade Counts 3-Part Guide: http://www.greatschoolspartnership.org/resources/ninth-grade- counts/ 25 </li> <li> Slide 26 </li> <li> Massachusetts Department of Elementary &amp; Secondary Education Summer bridge program: Lawrence Public Schools </li> <li> Slide 27 </li> <li> Massachusetts Department of Elementary &amp; Secondary Education 27 Profile of Lawrence High School Campus Serves nearly 3,600 students in eight high school schools/programs Nearly 92% are Latino/Hispanic, over 90% low income Four year graduation rate of 66.9% (up from 46.7% in 2010) District in state receivership as a level 5 District </li> <li> Slide 28 </li> <li> Massachusetts Department of Elementary &amp; Secondary Education 28 </li> <li> Slide 29 </li> <li> Massachusetts Department of Elementary &amp; Secondary Education History of Program In the past, a summer bridge program was run for a cohort of about 50 students. For 8 th graders most at risk of high school failure; indicators used included: 1) # of discipline referrals 2) failure in core classes {language arts &amp; mathematics} 3) attendance. 29 </li> <li> Slide 30 </li> <li> Massachusetts Department of Elementary &amp; Secondary Education History of Program 50 students was a small number of the total at risk population No offerings for on-track or advanced students. No offerings for 8 th graders at city charter schools or parochial schools. Students were awarded high school credits and took classes in language arts, mathematics, school success, &amp; some type of enrichment. Participants may or may not have been assigned teachers that would be working with them during the regular school year. This was a problem because with 6 schools on campus, students did not make connections with teachers who would be assigned to them during the calendar school year 30 </li> <li> Slide 31 </li> <li> Massachusetts Department of Elementary &amp; Secondary Education History of Program Middle school staff were primarily responsible for selecting students for the program. Not all identified students attended. If students did not attend, there was not a clear policy on whether they would need to repeat 8 th grade of if they could move on to 9 th grade. There are many students that benefit from this type of program, currently 70% of the districts 8 th graders are identified as high/moderate risk in EWIS, that is over 700 students. 31 </li> <li> Slide 32 </li> <li> Massachusetts Department of Elementary &amp; Secondary Education What does the summer program look like now? LHS READY Summer 2014, program ran from June 25 th to July 25 th. A little more than 4 hours per day English, mathematics, and enrichment All 8 th graders in district, charter, and parochial schools invited to attend. Classes offered for all levels of students. Students assigned to grade 9 teachers of the high school that they would attend; i.e. a 9 th grader assigned to the Health &amp; Human Services High School was assigned to grade 9 HHS teachers during the LHS Ready Program. 472 students attended the program. 32 </li> <li> Slide 33 </li> <li> Massachusetts Department of Elementary &amp; Secondary Education Connection to School Students were awarded a semester of English and a semester of mathematics credit. For students who were behind, there was reinforcement and intervention. Project Adventure was incorporated for team building as students were coming from neighborhood schools and were meeting many new peers. As there are 1,500 students bused to campus; students were able to take care of any busing questions during LHS Ready instead of at the start of the academic year. Summer program teachers continued as their teachers during the academic year. As their LHS Ready teachers were also their academic year teachers, there was continuous follow-up during the academic year. 33 </li> <li> Slide 34 </li> <li> Massachusetts Department of Elementary &amp; Secondary Education Preliminary Success SchoolYear grade 9 retentions grade 9 retention % 4 Yr Graduation Rate Year grade 9 retentions grade 9 retention % 4 Yr Graduation Rate Business Management and Finance 2010573144.120142016.877.7 Health and Human Services 20104422.856.3201453.585.8 Performing Arts Academy 20105631.856.82014127.782.4 The summer programming is just a slice of the pie which has undergone dramatic change since receivership; other things that have contributed are extended instructional hours, vacation instructional academies, evening credit recovery, alternative programming (Phoenix Academy Lawrence &amp; High School Learning Center), etc. 34 </li> <li> Slide 35 </li> <li> Massachusetts Department of Elementary &amp; Secondary Education 35 THANK YOU! Contact: Juan Rodriguez juan.rodriguez@lawrence.k12.ma.us juan.rodriguez@lawrence.k12.ma.us To hear from the youth themselves! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qFxTJQmOKEM </li> </ul>