Many Hats  Performer  Recording engineer  Producer  Arranger  Composer  Copyist  Troubleshoot

Download Many Hats  Performer  Recording engineer  Producer  Arranger  Composer  Copyist  Troubleshoot

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  • Slide 1
  • Many Hats Performer Recording engineer Producer Arranger Composer Copyist Troubleshoot
  • Slide 2
  • Tools of the Trade Recording Compose Arranging Notation Web Page E-mail Archiving
  • Slide 3
  • DAW Digital Audio Workstation
  • Slide 4
  • Software Wave editing Automated mixing On-board FX 3 rd party plug ins
  • Slide 5
  • Pre-amp Mic needs to be amplified Mixer Dedicated pre-amp A tube pre-amp uses vacuums tubes to amplify the sound. This can produce a warmer sound, often at the cost of distorting the audio signal. A solid state pre-amp generally produces a cleaner sound Phantom Power allows them to power condenser microphones
  • Slide 6
  • Audio Interface Built in pre-amps Digital / analog ins and outs Bit rate 16, 24 Bit rate - connection speed, transfer rate, channel capacity, etc. Sampling rate - samples per second 44.1 48 88.2 96 176.4 192khz USB Firewire Headphone jack
  • Slide 7
  • Hard Disk Recorders Complete recording tool Inexpensive Portable Limited editing Limited FX
  • Slide 8
  • Monitoring Headphones Room doesnt influence sound Flat response Inexpensive
  • Slide 9
  • Condenser mics Requires phantom power Large diaphragm has extended low end Some guitars may sound too boomy Use built-in bass roll-off switch
  • Slide 10
  • Dynamic mic Works like a speaker in reverse Great for miking guitar amps Not recommended for acoustic guitar
  • Slide 11
  • Ribbon Mic Ribbon microphones consist of a thin, narrow metal ribbon (usually aluminum) positioned between two magnets. Smooth natural sounding, though a bit darker than darker than condenser mic Ribbons can be more fragile than other types of microphones
  • Slide 12
  • Omnidirectional Equally sensitive to sound waves on all sides Great for natural sounding recordings with an entire ensemble Less desirable in live sessions when monitors are used
  • Slide 13
  • Cardioid This pattern resembles a heart and is more sensitive on front and sides than on the back Cardioid patterns diminish bleed when miking separate instruments in the same room
  • Slide 14
  • Hypercardioid Narrower then cardioid Pattern is highly sensitive in front and less on sides Pattern lessens potential for feedback in live situations
  • Slide 15
  • Bi-directional or figure 8 Pattern is sensitive on front and back but not on sides Useful for recording two musicians facing each other
  • Slide 16
  • Stereo miking techniques XY ORTF Spaced pair Stereo mics Matched pair Two different mics
  • Slide 17
  • XY Simplest and most popular Typically angled 90 to 135 degrees apart The wider the angle, the broader the stereo spread Use directional mics cardioid or hypercardioid
  • Slide 18
  • ORTF O ffice of R adio T elevision F rance Two cardioid mics with capsules spaced 6.69 inches apart and angled at 110 degrees Designed to mimic human hearing accurate image and good sense of depth
  • Slide 19
  • Spaced pair Two identical mics placed several feet apart and aimed directly at sound source Any polar pattern but each mic must use same pattern Usually placed parallel to each other
  • Slide 20
  • Stereo mics Some are simply two capsules in a single housing Used to avoid the hassle of setting up two mics Microphone bar
  • Slide 21
  • Two different mics Create a more complex stereo picture of the guitar by using two different mics One aimed below the strings to capture sparkle The other set to omni reproduces a broader, ambient sound
  • Slide 22
  • Matched pair Two identical microphones set to either an omni or cardioid mode Omni - too much room sound may interfere with recording
  • Slide 23
  • A word about acoustic pickups Piezo pickups usually sound thin, tinny an excruciatingly buzzy Fishman Taylor expression system Combine with mic sound
  • Slide 24
  • Mic Placement Matter of personal preference and taste Generally use close miking between six inches and three feet Moving a mic a few inches can change the character drastically Proximity effect low frequency boost when mic is placed very close to the instrument Off axis coloration loss of high frequency response from sound arriving at the back or sides Omni do not suffer from this phenomena
  • Slide 25
  • Guitar design
  • Slide 26
  • Martin Invented modern steel string Most imitated guitar design Rich, woody sound, thick with texture High notes sweet not sharp Large Martins are tough to record Be careful placing mics to avoid boomy, muddy sound Suggest small diaphragm condenser
  • Slide 27
  • Gibson Sound of the guitar depends on the era Gibsons seemed to share a shorter sustain especially in the bass The quick decay gives a punchy sound that is hard to get from other designs Many blues players treasure these instruments
  • Slide 28
  • Taylor Emphasized clarity instead of a thick texture Each note comes through clean and well defined whether high or low Recording engineers dream
  • Slide 29
  • Electric guitar Can be recorded DI (direct interject) without a speaker and mic in the signal chain Direct box Transformer plug FX stomp box
  • Slide 30
  • Electric guitar (cont) Close mic the amp Point mic directly at the speaker about 2/3 the distance between the edge and center of dome 1 to 2 feet awaylisten Use second mic to pick up room ambience 3 feet to the length of room and may combine with other mic
  • Slide 31
  • Electric guitar (cont) If not sure and have enough tracks record all mics and direct signals to separate tracks Re-amp record dry DI signal and send it back through an amp, FX box or software plug-in
  • Slide 32
  • EQ Equalization (EQ) is the process of changing the frequency envelope of a sound
  • Slide 33
  • EQ Frequency. The specific frequency (in hz or khz) that is being boosted or cut. Boost/Cut. The amount (usually in decibels) that the specific frequency is boosted or cut. Q (Bandwidth). Q is the range of frequencies around the center point that is boosted or cut. Low Q settings indicate a wider bandwidth and are useful for gentle, sweeping EQ settings.
  • Slide 34
  • EQ Parametric EQ is an equalizer which has controls for Frequency, Bandwidth or Q, and Gain.
  • Slide 35
  • EQ A Low Shelf cuts or boosts all frequencies below the specified freqency. For example, a low shelf set at 250 Hz will affect all frequencies below 250 Hz. A High Shelf cuts or boosts all frequencies above the specified frequency. A high shelf set a 12 KHz will affect all frequencies above 12 KHz
  • Slide 36
  • EQ A High Pass (Low Cut) Filter is used to cut off frequencies below the set frequency A Low Pass (High Cut) Filter is used to cut off frequencies above the set frequency.
  • Slide 37
  • EQ Lose the mud Cut at 80hz or 100hz if sound is boomy Add body Wimpy low mids punched up by boosting 250hz and 500hz
  • Slide 38
  • EQ Tame the ring Ugly mids can be diminished by cutting between 800hz and 500hz Dead strings Return the snap by boosting between 800hz and 5khz Embrace the sparkle Marvelous high end: boost between 10khz and 12khz
  • Slide 39
  • Compressor Control dynamics The difference in loudness level between the softest and loudest sounds is reduced in order to make the audio audible in usual listening environments. Your car
  • Slide 40
  • Resources Monthly journals Recording EQ Electronic musician Mix How to books Mix bookshelf Amazon Web sites
  • Slide 41
  • Web Sites
  • Slide 42
  • www.RansomedProductions.com