Making Connections: Brain-Based Learning and the Art of Teaching

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Making Connections: Brain-Based Learning and the Art of Teaching. You have brains in your head You have feet in your shoes You can steer yourself any direction you choose! Dr. Suess. Lori Walker Rick Stepp-Bolling. The Developmental Education Faculty Certification Program. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  • Making Connections: Brain-Based Learning and the Art of TeachingLori Walker Rick Stepp-BollingYou have brains in your headYou have feet in your shoes

    You can steer yourself any direction you choose! Dr. Suess

  • The Developmental Education Faculty Certification ProgramThree ModulesEight Weeks each16 Hours of In-Class Time and 32 Hours of Outside Class TimeEach Module=2 Units of Crossover Credit

  • Module One: Philosophy and Definitions of Developmental EducationBrain-Compatible LearningStudent-Center LearningMultiple IntelligencesEmotional IntelligencesLearning Styles

  • Module Two: Facilitating a Developmental Education Approach within the ClassroomProblem-Based LearningProject-Based LearningInfusion of Study Skills into the Content AreasClassroom Assessment Techniques

  • Module Three: Introduction to Learning Communities and Developing a Holistic Developmental Approach to the ClassroomIntroduction to Learning CommunitiesCreation of a Learning Community Using DE Principles

  • Brain Basics 101

  • Todays OutcomesUnderstand the Research Foundation for Brain-based/Student-Centered Learning

    Learn, Understand and Apply Effective Brain-based Practices Used in the Classroom Setting

  • Check-In

  • Brain-based/Student-Centered Learning

    How do YOU currently define:

    developmental education? developmental learners?

  • Defining our perspective... Developmental education is a field of practice and research within higher education with a theoretical foundation in developmental psychology and learning theory. It promotes the cognitive and affective growth of all postsecondary learners, at all levels of the learning continuum. Developmental education is sensitive and responsive to the individual differences and special needs among learners. -Adopted from NADE (National Association of Developmental Educators)

  • Remedial vs. DevelopmentalDevelopmental PerspectiveFocuses on how the learner learnsAssumes students are at a variety of levels simultaneously

    Considers the cognitive and affective dynamics of learning

    Includes outside services designed to meet the cognitive and affective needs of studentsFocuses on the development of a variety of learning strategies

    Helps students master their educational/life goals and objectivesRemedial PerspectiveFocuses on the skills that need to be learnedAssumes that students lack certain skills, and are at one particular levelConsiders only the cognitive dynamic of learningIncludes outside services designed to meet only the cognitive needs of studentsFocuses on learning strategies related to the specific skills that need to be learnedHelps students master specific academic skills

  • Developmental Student ProfileBased on the DE Definition, developmental education at Mt. San Antonio College empowers students to become independent learners by:

    1. Controlling their own learningStudents can explain how they learn (metacognition)Students take responsibility for their own learningStudents possess effective learning tools (e.g. self-assessment)

    2. Persisting in achieving their educational and life goalsStudents clarify their own academic/learning/life objectivesStudents arrive at realistic goals

  • Developmental Student Profile, Cont.

    3. Gaining academic skillsStudents possess skills in reading, writing, math, speaking and study skillsStudents are technologically proficient in basic software use

    4. Achieving affective awareness and growthStudents understand/tolerate diverse academic cultures and systemsStudents possess improved academic self-confidenceStudents are intrinsically motivated to learn

  • The oldest and smallest region in the evolving human brain. Controls life itself, such as autonomic brain and heart actions. Impulses are deeply instinctual and ritualistic. Concerned with basic survival needs, e.g., temperature, nourishment, sleep, and etc. _________________________________________________

    The Reptilian Brain: the "Preverbal" Brain

    Oxygen to the brain and body is the primary function of the reptilian system.

  • Common to all mammals, it developed about 60 million years ago. Acts as the brain's emotion factory. Activated by music and colors. Stores all memory information. The Reticular Activating System (RAS) will require its needs to be met before the rest of the brain is available for higher order functions. Retention of information can be significantly increased when it's presented in an emotionally charged context!The Limbic Brain: the "Emotional" Brain

  • Constitutes five-sixths of the total brain mass, which has evolved over the last million years, to produce the human brain. Controls such high-level processes as logic, creative thought, language, and the integration of sensory information. The Neocortex is divided into the left and right cerebral hemispheres, described in Left/Right Brain Theory. The Neocortex Brain: the "Thinking" BrainThis is the motherlode!

  • So ...who cares?

  • Brain-based Learning and Education

    Brain-based learning experiences pay attention to the power of the whole brain by simultaneously: Responding to the learner's physical and sensory needs Creating activities that link emotions to the acquisition of new information Designing curriculum that requires students to form their own knowledge/meaning Traditional education was designed for neocortex functions. However, this misses a basic brain fact: the reptilian brain is an interconnected pathway to the limbic brain which is an interconnected pathway to the neocortex -- you cant skip a brain function!

  • You can either have your learners attention, or they can be making meaning -- but never both at the same time. Jensen (1998)

  • How can you create a truly brain-based/student-centered learning environment?Create Class/Team Norms BEFORE any work is introduced

  • Class Norms

    Use our names when we speak and introduce ourselves -- nametags at first until we know one anotherHave one person each week share a great moment in her/his weekSnacks/beverages permitted optional to bring some to share Be respectful, prepared and ready to participateChange seats on a regular basisOne make-up assignmentCell phones on silent

  • How can you create a truly brain-based/student-centered learning environment?Create Class/Team Norms BEFORE any work is introducedGet them up and moving every 12-15 minutes

  • Now Its Your Time to Make Meaning!Draw a picture of what Brain-Based Learning looks like to you!

  • Now Its Your Time to Make Meaning!

    Find a partner who is currently the FARTHEST AWAY from you in the room and tell your partner two things you have learned thus far that you didnt already know.

  • How can you create a truly brain-based/student-centered learning environment?Create Class/Team Norms BEFORE any work is introducedGet them up and moving every 12-15 minutesCreate environments where they can teach one another, i.e., the jigsaw classroom

  • The Jigsaw Classroom

    Students form Expert Groups, each of whom has been given the same assigned topic to study. Together, expert partners study their topic and plan effective ways to teach important information to their peers.Participants in the Expert Groups go out and form new, Cooperative Groups.Each expert takes responsibility for sharing their expertise with the others in the Cooperative Group.

  • How can you create a truly brain-based/student-centered learning environment?Create Class/Team Norms BEFORE any work is introducedGet them up and moving every 12-15 minutesCreate environments where they can teach one another, i.e., the jigsaw classroomAllow time for silence (individual reflection)

  • Learning = Conscious + Unconscious

    The Learning Pyramid = Levels of Conscious ProcessingSilence/Reflection/Meditation = Unconscious Processing

    Fact: Meditation/Reflection substantially increases brain activity and reduces stress levels (cortisol) in the body.Fact: NASA Astronauts were instructed to daydream 20 minutes twice a day. Research showed that it increased their ability to create new solutions and anticipate unexpected situations by more than 40%!Fact: After doing PET scans of more than 500 common activities, meditation was found to produce the MOST active brain waves!

  • Reflection QuestionsWhen you begin a session, ask:What do you already know about this topic?What do you want to know about this topic?

    And the reflectionWhat have you learned about this topic?

  • How can you create a truly brain-based/student-centered learning environment?Create Class/Team Norms BEFORE any work is introducedGet them up and moving every 12-15 minutesCreate environments where they can teach one another, i.e., the jigsaw classroomAllow time for silence (individual reflection) Create the structure, release the process

  • Worksheet #1: Team Contact List

    Team Member Contact List

  • Worksheet #2: Team Member Grading Criteria

    The grade you receive on this project will significantly affect your overall grade in this class. You have all completed a group project, so you all know how important it is to have clear expectations of one another from the beginning. What are your expectations of one another? What is MOST important? What percentage of the grade you give one another will each criteria represent? And most importantly, how much will you grade one another if the criteria is not met? In other words, if someone is absent once, how much will you dock from their total 100 points? Tardy? Absent twice? And what if they dont do a homework assignment the team has assigned? What if they say they will call (i.e., communicate) and just dont? What if they say they will be somewhere, and simply dont show up? What if they are late with doing their share of the work? Be as SPECIFIC as possible. (NOTE: Choose a MAXIMUM of five criteria.)

    Team Member Grading Criteria

    As team members, we understand and agree to fulfill the expectations of our fellow team members. We also understand that our grade will be reflected in how well we uphold these expectations. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

  • Worksheet #3: Team Backwards Planning Timeline

  • Releasing the Process:Implications for Educators You can either have your learners attention, or they can be making meaning -- but never both at the same time. Jensen (1998)

    Brain-centered = student-centered = less educator controlSelf-awareness: how much control do you need?Walking the talk

  • Now Its Your TurnChoose two things you have learned today that you will commit to applying in your classroomShare your commitments with those at your table

  • Traditional Paradigm Emerging Paradigm1. Motivators are external2. Aging lowers ability3. IQ is a single-faceted, academic concept4. There are no sex differences5. Nurture is the main factor6. Germs cause disease7. Diet is unrelated to the brain8. The brain is seen as a computer9. Memory is retrieval of complete episodes

    1. Motivators are internal2. Use it or lose it!3. IQ is a multifaceted, street-smart concept4. The sexes are wired differently5. Nature is the main factor6. The mind controls disease7. Diet influences mental function8. The brain is seen as a pharmacy9. Memory is construction of episodes from pieces of information

    Owners Manual for The Brain by Dr. Pierce Howard

  • Want to Know More?The Owner's Manual for the Brain: Everyday Applications from Mind-Brain Research - Pierce J. Howard, Ph. D.

    Active Learning: 101 Strategies to Teach Any Subject -Mel Silbermanwww.jigsaw.org-The Jigsaw ClassroomThe Colour of Happiness New Scientist Vol 178 Issue 2396 - 24 May 2003, page 44.

    Brain Rules-John Medina

    How The Brain Learns-David A. Sousa

  • Where is Rick?Rick Stepp-BollingMt San Antonio College Learning Assistance Center, 6-150Telephone: (909) 594-5611, ext. 4303E-Mail: EStepp-Bolling@MtSAC.edu

  • Thank you.

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