lesson downloads > ielts academic module ... lesson downloads > ielts academic module preparation >

Download Lesson downloads > IELTS Academic Module ... Lesson downloads > IELTS Academic Module preparation >

Post on 27-Dec-2019

9 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • Lesson downloads > IELTS Academic Module preparation > Writing > Lesson 2 

    Introduction  In the last email lesson we looked at how to describe tables for IELTS writing task 1. We also  looked at how to deal with ‘problem and solution’ type discursive essays for task 2. In this lesson  we’ll continue looking at how to describe tables for task 1. We’ll also be looking at another kind of  composition for task 2 ­ the ‘advantages and disadvantages’ essay. 

    In this lesson you will…  §  practise identifying the important information in a table.  §  learn how to summarise figures from a table.  §  look at what makes a good opening paragraph for task 2 discursive essays.  §  review language for making comparisons.  §  practise planning a composition  §  review useful language for structuring an argument. 

    IELTS WRITING TASK 1: TABLES 

    Activity 1 > Identifying important information (1) > 5 minutes 

    The table you are given to describe in task 1 will probably contain far more information than you can  describe in the time and word limit. (Remember, you only have about 20 minutes and 150 words.)  You will have to pick out the most important information from the table, and to summarise the  figures. In fact, examiners are looking for your ability to do this. 

    Look at the table below.  Which figures do you think are the most important to mention? Circle the  figures you think should be mentioned. 

    Percentage of households with durable goods 1970­2005 

    C ar  

    C en tr al  

    H ea tin

    W as hi ng

      m ac hi ne  

    Tu m bl e 

    dr ye r 

    D is hw

    as he r 

    M ic ro w av e 

    ov en

     

    Ph on

    m ob

    ile  

    ph on

    Vi de

    o  re co rd er  

    Sa te lli te  

    re ce iv er  

    C D  p la ye r 

    C om

    pu te r 

    In te rn et  

    co nn

    ec tio

    n  1970  52  30  65  ­­  ­­  ­­  35  ­­  ­­  ­­  ­­  ­­  ­­  1975  57  47  72  ­­  ­­  ­­  52  ­­  ­­  ­­  ­­  ­­  ­­ 

    1980  60  59  79  ­­  ­­  ­­  72  ­­  ­­  ­­  ­­  ­­  ­­  1985  63  69  83  ­­  ­­  ­­  81  ­­  30  ­­  ­­  13  ­­ 

    1990  67  79  86  ­­  ­­  ­­  87  ­­  61  ­­  ­­  17  ­­  1994­95  69  84  89  50  18  67  91  ­­  76  ­­  46  ­­  ­­ 

    1995­96  70  85  91  50  20  70  92  ­­  79  ­­  51  ­­  ­­  1996­97  69  87  91  51  20  75  93  16  82  19  59  27  ­­  1997­98  70  89  91  51  22  77  94  20  84  26  63  29  ­­  1998­99  72  89  92  51  24  80  95  26  86  27  68  32  9  1998­99*  72  89  92  51  23  79  95  27  85  28  68  33  10  1999­2000*  71  90  91  52  23  80  95  44  86  32  72  38  19  2000­01*  72  91  92  53  25  84  93  47  87  40  77  44  32  2001­02 3 *  74  92  93  54  27  86  94  64  90  43  80  49  39  2002­03*  74  93  94  56  29  87  94  70  90  45  83  55  45  2003­04*  75  94  94  57  31  89  92  76  90  49  86  58  49  2004­05*  75  95  95  58  33  90  93  78  88  58  87  62  53 

    ­­  = no data available  Source: National Statistics (see http://www.statistics.gov.uk/copyright.asp for copyright details)

    http://www.statistics.gov.uk/copyright.asp

  • Activity 2 > Identifying important information (2) > 7 minutes 

    Now read the description for the table in Activity 1. As you read, find and circle the information in  the table. 

    This table shows how the percentage of households with certain durable goods changed over a  35 year period. It is interesting to see that goods that were probably luxury items at the beginning  of the period have now become almost universal. For example, only around a third of households  had central heating and telephones in 1970, but the figure had risen to 95% and 93% respectively  by 2004. 

    Ownership of some goods saw a steady increase over the 35 years. Households with cars, for  example, rose from 52% to 75%. Percentages for some goods, however, rose much more slowly.  Households with washing machines, for instance, rose by only 8% from 1994 onwards. 

    In sharp contrast, ownership of other goods rose dramatically over a very short period.  Households with mobile phones and Internet connections, for example, rose by around 50% in  only 6 years. Finally, it is worth noting that ownership of video recorders actually fell by 2%  between 2003 and 2004, no doubt due to the appearance of DVD players on the market. 

    Activity 3 > Identifying important information (3) > 7 minutes 

    Here’s another table with lots of information ­ far more than you could include in a short description.  Look at the table and then read the sentences which follow. Decide which sentences should be  included in your description and which are not important. 

    Average weekly household expenditure (£) 

    19 94 ­5  

    19 95 ­6  

    19 96 ­7  

    19 97 ­8  

    19 98 ­9  

    19 99 ­2 00 0 

    20 00 ­1  

    20 01 ­2  

    20 02 ­3  

    20 03 ­4  

    20 04 ­5  

    Housing  60.10  60.50  61.00  59.90  61.00  65.60  64.50  70.20  71.30  70.70  72.10  Fuel and  power  16.80  16.20  16.10  16.20  14.90  13.40  12.80  13.00  12.70  12.40  12.40 

    Food and  non­alcoholic  drinks 

    65.20  66.30  67.70  68.70  67.60  67.60  67.40  68.00  67.00  68.20  67.00 

    Alcoholic  drink  15.90  14.30  15.30  16.00  16.80  16.10  17.30  16.50  15.50  15.70  15.20 

    Tobacco  7.30  7.30  7.40  7.60  7.50  6.70  6.80  6.70  5.90  5.70  5.60  Clothing and  footwear  22.20  21.50  22.30  22.90  24.10  24.90  23.70  24.10  24.20  23.30  23.10 

    Household  goods  29.30  29.40  29.90  32.60  31.90  34.00  34.80  35.80  35.80  35.90  36.20 

    Household  services  19.50  19.00  19.00  19.80  21.00  21.70  21.40  24.10  25.50  24.80  25.70 

    Personal  goods and  services 

    13.90  14.50  14.70  14.50  15.00  15.30  15.70  16.10  16.20  16.20  16.70 

    Motoring  46.80  46.40  47.90  51.60  56.00  59.40  59.50  60.50  62.70  65.40  64.40  Fares and  other travel  costs 

    8.60  7.70  8.30  9.40  10.20  9.50  10.40  10.40  10.10  8.50  10.00 

    Leisure goods  18.00  17.20  18.10  19.30  20.60  20.50  21.00  21.70  21.30  21.70  22.10  Leisure  services  40.40  40.20  41.00  42.80  46.80  48.20  49.70  55.60  56.20  56.80  56.80 

    Miscellaneous  3.00  3.00  1.50  1.20  1.30  1.40  1.60  0.80  2.00  2.00  2.00  All  expenditure  366.90  363.30  370.30  382.60  394.50  404.40  406.60  423.40  426.30  427.30  429.10 

    Source: National Statistics (see http://www.statistics.gov.uk/copyright.asp for copyright details)

    http://www.statistics.gov.uk/copyright.asp

  • 1  Overall household expenditure rose by more than £60 per week over the ten year period.  2  Between 2001 and 2005, weekly expenditure remained steady at around £427.  3  The biggest single rise in total expenditure was between 2001 and 2002.  4  Households spent £56 per week on motoring in 1998.  5  The amount spent on housing rose by £12 over the ten year period.  6  Households spent £12.80 on fuel and power in 2000.  7  Generally the amount spent on fuel and power has fallen steadily since 1994.  8  Expenditure on tobacco rose by ten pence between 1995 and 1996.  9  Clothing was the seventh largest household expense in 2004.  10  The biggest rises in weekly expenditure over the ten years were for motoring and leisure  services. 

    Activity 4 > Summarising and grouping figures together (1) > 7 minutes 

    One way to summarise the information in a big table is to group numbers together. For example,  with the previous table about household expenditure, you could group years together and describe  the change over a three or five year period. 

    Alternatively, you could group different expenditures together into one expenditure type. For  example, leisure goods and leisure services could be grouped together as one expenditure called  ‘leisure’. 

    Of course, this means you have to do a little maths! Look again at the table from Activity 3 and then  choose the best answer for the questions that follow. 

    1 What was the total weekly expenditure on leisure in 2004­5?  A £78.90  B £100  C £75.20 

    2 What was the rise in all expenditure from 2000­2001 to 2001­2?  A about £35  B about £17  C about £27  3 What