interactive mathematics program (imp). goals of imp  motivate students to engage with mathematics...

Download Interactive Mathematics Program (IMP). Goals of IMP  Motivate students to engage with mathematics  Help students become powerful problem solvers

Post on 27-Dec-2015

215 views

Category:

Documents

1 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • Slide 1
  • Interactive Mathematics Program (IMP)
  • Slide 2
  • Goals of IMP Motivate students to engage with mathematics Help students become powerful problem solvers
  • Slide 3
  • Powerful Problem Solvers From the accountant who explores the consequences of changes in tax law to the engineer who designs a new aircraft, the practitioner of mathematics in the computer age is more likely to solve equations by computer-generated graphs and calculations than by manual algebraic manipulations. Mathematics today involves far more than calculation; clarification of the problem, deduction of consequences, formulation of alternatives, and development of appropriate tools are as much a part of the modern mathematician s craft as are solving equations or providing answers. Everybody Counts, National Research Council, 1989, p. 5
  • Slide 4
  • Goals of IMP Motivate students to engage with mathematics Help students become powerful problem solvers Prepare students for the future
  • Slide 5
  • The Future We are currently preparing students for jobs that dont yet exist using technology that hasnt yet been invented in order to solve problems we dont even know are problems yet. 1 1 The Jobs Revolution: Changing How America Works, Richard Riley, 2004.
  • Slide 6
  • Principle 1: List of Concepts and Skills Concepts and skills selected and kept in mind Examples: Write proofs and/or explanations of thought processes Use the distributive law to rewrite algebraic expressions Explain why division by zero is not well defined
  • Slide 7
  • Principle 2: Organized around big problems Five big problems a year for 4 years Skills taught in smaller problems inside the big problems Rational: Motivate and problem solving
  • Slide 8
  • Abby and Bing Woo have a small bakery shop that makes cookies. They make only two kind of cookies: plain and iced. They need to decide how many dozens of each kind of cookies to make for tomorrow. They are limited by the following things: the amount of ingredients they have on hand; the amount of space available in their oven; and the amount of preparation time. How many dozens of each kind of cookie should Abby and Bing make, so that their profits are as high as possible?
  • Slide 9
  • Slide 10
  • Slide 11
  • Principle 3: Active Involvement To motivate The proof of the Pythagorean Theorem
  • Slide 12
  • Proof by Rugs 1.Are the areas of the two rugs the same? 2. How do the two rugs demonstrate that the Pythagorean Theorem holds in general?
  • Slide 13
  • Principle 3: Active Involvement To motivate students to engage with mathematics The proof of the Pythagorean Theorem Used to motivate definitions Example: regression
  • Slide 14
  • Two Suggested Solutions Student A said that the function f given by the equation f(x) = 40 + 8x approximated the data well. So student A predicted that on April 18, Mr. Dunkalot would have 280 foot-pounds of strength and would be strong enough to play. Student B said the function g given by the equation g(x) = 55 + 6x approximated the data well. So student B predicted that on April 18, Mr. Dunkalot would have only 235 foot-pounds of strength and would not be strong enough to play.
  • Slide 15
  • Your Questions 1.Which students function seems to you to fit the data better, and why? 2.Do you have a function that you think fits the data better than either of these? If so, what is it? 3.Develop a mathematical procedure by which you might judge when one function fits data better than another.
  • Slide 16
  • Principle 4: Abstractions introduced concretely Through stages over time
  • Slide 17
  • Regression By hand with fettuccini Intuitively with graphing calculators Constructing a procedure Using the built in facility on a calculator
  • Slide 18
  • Principle 4: Abstractions introduced concretely Through stages over time Using physical objects With metaphors
  • Slide 19
  • Alice Metaphor for Exponential Growth [Alice] found a little bottle... with the words DRINK ME [Alice] found in it a very small cake, on which the words EAT ME
  • Slide 20
  • Principle 5: Multiple Representations Deeper understanding by seeing different perspectives Accommodates different learning styles Can apply more widely to new problems
  • Slide 21
  • 2 0 = 1 Through the Alice metaphor By a numerical pattern Graphically Deductively Then present the definition Finally, a reflection
  • Slide 22
  • 2 0 = 1: Number Pattern 2 5 = 32 2 4 = 16 2 3 = 8 2 2 = 4 2 1 = 2 2 0 = ?
  • Slide 23
  • 2 0 = 1: Graphically
  • Slide 24
  • 2 0 = 1: Deductively 2 3 2 0 = 2 3 8 ? = 8
  • Slide 25
  • Negative Reflections Write a clear explanation summarizing what you have learned about defining expressions that have zero or a negative integer as an exponent. Explain, using examples, why these definitions make sense. Give as many different reasons as you can and indicate which explanation makes the most sense to you.
  • Slide 26
  • 2 0 = 1 Through the Alice metaphor By a numerical pattern Graphically Deductively Then present the definition Finally, a reflection WHY ALLTHIS???
  • Slide 27
  • Why All This Equity issue to include more students in problem solving People who could make valuable contributions to society are being excluded from math knowledge Evidence says the top students are not being harmed and are gaining more

Recommended

View more >