[insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 section 24 meetings convened by ewos during the...

of 93 /93

Upload: others

Post on 10-Aug-2020

3 views

Category:

Documents


0 download

TRANSCRIPT

Page 1: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning
Page 2: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

2

CONTENTS

1.0 PERFORMANCE OVERVIEW .............................................................................. 3

2.0 CHILD PROTECTION AND WELFARE SERVICES ........................................... 10

2.1 Referrals (Child Welfare And Child Abuse/Neglect) ...................................................................... 10

2.2 Social Work Activity Data (Child Protection & Welfare) ................................................................. 18

2.3 Child Protection Notification System .............................................................................................. 23

2.4 Emergency Out Of Hours Social Work Service / Crisis Intervention Service ................................ 27

3.0 ALTERNATIVE CARE SERVICES...................................................................... 29

3.1 Children in Care (Foster Care / Residential Care) ......................................................................... 29

3.2 Aftercare ......................................................................................................................................... 39

3.3 Adoption Services .......................................................................................................................... 45

3.4 Foster Carers ................................................................................................................................. 49

3.5 Hiqa Inspections ............................................................................................................................. 55

4.0 REGULATORY FUNCTIONS .............................................................................. 56

4.1 Early Years Inspectorate ................................................................................................................ 56

4.2 Alternative Education Regulation ................................................................................................... 59

4.3 Non-Statutory Alternative Care Services ....................................................................................... 63

5.0 EDUCATIONAL WELFARE SERVICES ............................................................. 64

6.0 FAMILY SUPPORT SERVICES .......................................................................... 69

6.1 Family Support Services ................................................................................................................ 69

6.2 Meitheal .......................................................................................................................................... 75

7.0 HUMAN RESOURCES ........................................................................................ 81

8.0 FINANCE ............................................................................................................. 88

APPENDIX I .................................................................................................................. 90

APPENDIX II – Hiqa Inspections ................................................................................. 91

03 December 2018

Page 3: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

3

1.0 PERFORMANCE OVERVIEW

This report provides an update on the performance and activity of Tusla services at the end of Q3

2018. It is structured around key performance and activity measures included in the Agency’s

Business Plan. The data presented was provided by services and refers to the latest performance and

activity information available at this time. These data can change from data previously

published due to the ongoing validation of data.

The summary by service type set out below provides an overview of the Q3 2018 position regarding

activity and performance.

CHILD PROTECTION AND WELFARE SERVICES

Referrals

14,074 referrals in Q2 2018; 189 (1.3%) fewer than the same quarter last year (14,263).

54% (n=7,575) of referrals for child welfare concerns; fewest number for all quarters

since Q4 2016.

46% (n=6,499) of referrals for child abuse concerns; highest number for all quarters Q1

2014 – Q3 2018.

98% (n=13,850) of referrals for Q2 2018 had a preliminary enquiry carried out.

39% (5,459) of preliminary enquiries were done within 5 days (based on data for 16/17

areas)

24% (n=3,274) of referrals that had a preliminary enquiry required an initial

assessment.

28% (907/3,274) of initial assessments were done within 40 days. (based on data for

16/17 areas)

‘No further action’ was recorded in 39% (651) of cases where outcome was provided (n-

1,651).

Social Work Activity Data

25,696 cases open to social work at the end of Q3 2018; 558 (2%) more than Q2 2018 and

223 fewer than Q3 2017

77% (n=19,716) of open cases allocated to named social worker; no change from Q2 2018

5,980 cases were awaiting allocation; 124 (2%) more than Q2 2018 (5,856) and 696 (13%)

more than Q3 2017 (5,284).

829 (14%) of the cases awaiting allocation at the end of Q3 2018 were categorised as ‘high

priority’; 158 (16%) fewer than Q2 2018 and 137 (14%) fewer than Q3 2017

54% (n=3,213) of all cases awaiting allocation at the end of Q3 2018 were waiting less

than 3 months.

Page 4: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

4

Children in Care

6,072 children in care at the end of Q3 2018; 60 fewer than Q2 2018 and 158 (3%) fewer than

Q3 2017.

641 children in private placements; 18 more than Q2 2018 and the highest number for the

period Q1 2017 – Q3 2018.

91% (n=5,507) of children in care had an allocated social worker (against a target of 100%),

down one percentage point on Q2 2018

565 children were awaiting allocation of a social worker; 50 more than Q2 2018

90% (n=5,444) of children in care had an up to date care plan (against a target of 90%), down

one percentage point from Q2 2018.

628 children did not have an up-to-date care plan; 82 more than Q2 2018. One area

(CW/KK/ST) advised that they are validating their data and figures need to be interpreted

with caution.

Emergency Out of Hours Social Work Service / Crisis Intervention Service

255 referrals to the Crisis Intervention Service (CIS) in Q3 2018; four more than Q2 2018

and nine more than Q3 2017.

80 children were placed with the CIS during Q3 2018; eight more than Q2 2018 and three

fewer than Q3 2017

256 referrals to the Emergency Out of Hours Social Work Service (EOHS) in Q3 2018; 38

more than Q2 2018 and the highest number for all quarters Q3 2017 – Q3 2018

72 children were placed by the EHOS during Q2 2018; two fewer than Q2 2018 and five

more than Q3 2017.

Child Protection Notification System

1,169 children listed as ‘active’ on the CPNS at the end of Q3 2018; 74 more than Q2 2018

and 233 fewer than Q3 2017

86% (1,003) of children listed as “active” were listed for no longer than 18 months

All children listed as “active” at the end of Q3 2018 had an allocated social worker.

Page 5: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

5

Aftercare

2,366 young persons/adults in receipt of an aftercare service at the end of Q3 2018; 27 more

than Q2 2018 (2,292)

64% (1,257/1,979) of those 18-22 years inclusive in receipt of an aftercare service were in

education/accredited training

77% (1,830) of young persons/adults in receipt of aftercare services had an aftercare plan;

down three percentage points on Q2 2018. Although improved from Q2 2018, rates

reported by DSW/K/WW (39%; 84/217) and Dublin South Central (41%; 57/139)

substantially lower than all other areas.

93% (1,635) of those assessed as needing an aftercare worker had an aftercare worker; down

three percentage points from Q2 2018. Rate reported by the three areas Dublin South

Central (72%), DSW/K/WW (63%) and LH/MH (68%) lower than all other areas.

Adoption

268 new applications to commence tracing for a searched person in Q3 2018; one more than

Q2 2018

845 applicants awaiting an information and tracing service at the end of Q3 2018; 97 (13%)

more than Q2 2018 and the highest number for the period Q1 2017 – Q3 2018.

Four of the five services meeting the target of eight weeks or less from time of application to

provision of non-identifying information

45 receipted completed applications for adoption (all types) received in Q3 2018, bringing the

total for the first nine months of 2018 to 162; 24 more than same period last year (138)

47 new children were referred for adoption in Q3 2018, bringing to the total for the first nine

months of 2018 to 148, six more than the same period last year (n=142).

24 completed adoption assessments presented to Local Adoption Committees in Q3 2018,

bringing the total for the first nine months of 2018 to 105; four fewer than the same period last

year.

Page 6: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

6

REGULATORY FUNCTIONS

Early Years Services

4,457 EYS on the register nationally at the end of Q3 2018; fewest number for the period Q3

2017 – Q3 2018

524 EYS inspections (all types) carried out during Q3 2018; 172 (25%) fewer than Q2 2018

and the fewest number for all quarters Q3 2017 – Q3 2018. Brings to 1,928 the number

carried out for 2018 YTD

44 incidents notified to the Inspectorate in Q3 2018; 26 fewer than Q2 2018 when the

highest number for the period Q2 2017 – Q2 2018 was reported. This brings to 171 the

number notified for the first nine months of 2018.

109 unsolicited information submissions received by the Inspectorate during Q3 2018. This

brings to 288 the number of submissions for the first nine months of 2018.

63 incidents notified to the Inspectorate in Q4 2017 bringing the total number for 2017 to

203

to 295

63 incidents notified to the Inspectorate in Q4 2017 bringing the total number for 2017 to

203

Foster Carers (commentary based on data for 16/17 areas).

At least 3,827 foster carers on the panel of approved foster carers at the end of Q3 2018; 4,296

at the end of Q2 2018

82% (n=(1,006/1,227) of relative foster carers approved against a target of 80%

89% (n=2,095) of general foster carers had an allocated link worker (target 90%); 272

awaiting a link work. 295 awaiting at the end of Q2.

88% (n=890) of approved relative foster carers had an allocated link worker (target of 85%);

116 awaiting a link worker. 196 awaiting at the end of Q2 2018

At least 221 unapproved relative foster carer; 274 at the end of Q2 2018

175 (79%) of the unapproved relative foster carers had a child placed with them for longer

than 12 weeks; 215 (78%) at the end of Q2 2018

91% (n=159) of unapproved relative foster carers with a child placed > 12 weeks had an

allocated link (social) worker. 16 unapproved carers awaiting a link worker across four

areas. 46 unapproved carers awaiting a link worker at the end of Q2 2018.

Page 7: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

7

EDUCATIONAL WELFARE SERVICES

Alternative Education Regulation

Home Education

1,434 children on the register for home education at the end of Q3 2018; nine fewer than Q2

2018 when the highest number for all quarters Q1 2017 – Q2 2018 was reported

191 applications received for home education in Q3 2018, bringing the total for 2018 YTD to

459

474 children awaiting assessment for registration at the end of Q3 2018; 120 (34%) more

than Q2 2018 and the highest number for the period Q1 2017 – Q3 2018.

525 registered children awaiting a review at the end of Q3 2018; 99 fewer than Q2 2018 and

the fewest number for all quarters Q1 2017 – Q3 2018.

Independent Schools

5,254 children attending 43 assessed schools at the end of Q3 2018; 18 fewer than Q2 2018

363 new children’s applications for education in independent schools received in Q3 2018

bringing the total for 2018 YTD to 778

940 children awaiting registration at the end of Q3 2018; 12 fewer than Q2 2018.

Non-Statutory Alternative Care Services

123 non-statutory residential centres at the end of Q3 2018; up five on Q2 2018

36 inspections (all types and onsite) conducted in Q3 2018, bringing the total for the first nine

months of 2018 to 88.

Educational Welfare Services

Academic year 2018/2019 (Sept)

3,468 individual children worked with during September 2018

313 new individual children worked with during September 2018

1,603 screened referrals on a waiting list at the end of the academic year; 61 fewer than august

2018 and third consecutive monthly decrease

47 school attendance notices (SANs) issued in respect of 32 children under Section 25 of the

Education (Welfare) Act 20001 during September 2018

21 summonses issued in respect of 15 children under Section 25 of the Act during September

2018

20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year

Page 8: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

8

FAMILY SUPPORT SERVICES

HUMAN RESOURCES OVERVIEW

Human Resources

3,801 (WTE) employed by the Agency at the end of Q3 2018; 32 more than Q2 2018 and 158

(4%) more than Q3 2017

366 new staff came on to the Agency’s payroll in the first nine months of 2018

225 staff left (incl. retirements) the Agency in the first nine months of 2018

160 staff on maternity leave at the end of August 2018

4.97% absence rate (August 2018); 0.28 percentage points higher than Q2 2018 but 0.24

percentage points lower than August 2017.

117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning & Development during

Q3 2018 at which 1,850 persons attended.

5,465 completions of online training courses related to Children First

Family Support Services (data reported bi-annually, Q2 and Q4)

Data based on an 81% response rate.

Family Support Services includes those services funded through a Service Arrangement with the Agency and those funded internally and delivered through the Agency

At least 18,901 children in receipt of family support services at the end of June 2018

At least 17,189 children referred to family support services between January and June 2018

At least 73% (12,627) of children referred to family support services received a service

Meitheal (data reported bi-annually, Q2 and Q4)

802 Meitheal processes requested in the first six months of 2018; 198 (33%) more than the last

six months of 2017

79% (634) requested through Direct Access, 14% (116) requested through Social Work Diversion

and 6% (52) Social Work Step Down

83% (665) of Meitheal processes requested proceeded to Stage 2 (Discussion Stage)

472 Meitheal processes reached completion of Stage 2; 75% (356) of these proceeded to Stage 3

(Delivery)

365 Meitheal processes were closed in the first six months of 2018; 39% (141) were closed

following submission of a Meitheal request form; 18% (65) closed following completion of Stage

2; 17% (61) closed following commencement of Stage 3 and 27% (98) closed post- delivery.

103 Child and Family Support Networks (CFSN) operating at the end of June 2018, with a further

20 planned.

Page 9: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

9

FINANCIAL OVERVIEW

Finance

The financial outturn for September 2018 YTD is an over-spend of €9.025 million

Pay costs are over-spent against budget by €2.184 million

Non pay costs are over-spent against budget by €9.286 million

Key area of over-spend is private residential and foster care costs at €9.080 million over

budget

49% (€10.982 million) of legal expenditure year to date (€22.596 million) on guardians ad

litem (GALs), including GAL’s solicitors and counsel.

Page 10: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

10

2.0 CHILD PROTECTION AND WELFARE SERVICES

KEY AREAS OF FOCUS

2.1 Referrals (child welfare and child abuse)

2.2 Social Work Activity Data

2.3 Child Protection Notification System (CPNS)

2.4 Crisis Intervention Service / Out of Hours Service

2.1 REFERRALS (CHILD WELFARE AND CHILD ABUSE/NEGLECT)

Number of Referrals

14,074 referrals to Child Protection and Welfare Service during Q2 20181; 189 (1.3%) fewer

than the same quarter last year (14,263). Due to incomplete data for Q1 2018 comparison with

previous quarters is not meaningful - (one area (WD/WX) was not in a position to provide a

full figure for Q1 2018)

54% (n=7,575) of referrals for Q2 2018 were for child welfare concerns, the fewest number for

all quarters since Q4 2016.

The remaining 46% (n=6,499) were for child abuse/neglect concerns; the highest number for

all quarters Q1 2014 – Q2 2018.

1 Data on referrals are reported quarterly in arrears.

Key Facts

14,074 referrals in Q2 2018; 189 (1.3%) fewer than the same quarter last year (14,263).

54% (n=7,575) of referrals for child welfare concerns; fewest number for all quarters

since Q4 2016.

46% (n=6,499) of referrals for child abuse concerns; highest number for all quarters Q1

2014 – Q3 2018.

98% (n=13,850) of referrals for Q2 2018 had a preliminary enquiry carried out.

39% (5,459) of preliminary enquiries were done within 5 days (based on data for 16/17

areas)

24% (n=3,274) of referrals that had a preliminary enquiry required an initial

assessment.

28% (907/3,274) of initial assessments were done within 40 days. (based on data for

16/17 areas)

‘No further action’ was recorded in 39% (651) of cases where outcome was provided (n-

1,651).

Page 11: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

11

Number of referrals (child welfare and abuse/neglect) by quarter

Referrals by Area

Five areas (DSW/K/WW, Midlands, Cork, Waterford/Wexford* and MidWest) reported in

excess of 1,000 referrals in Q2 2018 with a further six areas reporting between 500 and 1,000

referrals.

9/17 areas reported an increase in referrals from Q2 2017. The highest increase was reported

by DSW/K/WW (up 299) followed by the Midwest (up 298), GY/RN (up 229), CW/KK/ST (up

157), WD/WX (up 102), Cork (up 81), SLWC (up 46), Kerry (up 28) and Mayo (up 19).

7/17 areas reported a decrease. The greatest decrease was reported by Midlands (down 151)

followed by Dublin South Central (down 120), LH/MH (down 40), Dublin North City (down

37), CN/MN (down 26), Dublin North (down 10) and DSE/WW (down 9). Donegal reported

no change.

Referrals by area Q1 2016 – Q2 2018

* Q2 2018 data for WD/WX are undergoing validation – revised data to be included in the Q4 2018 report

10

,85

3

11

,45

0

10

,38

4

10

,94

3

10

,99

3

10

,89

9

10

,71

1

10

,99

3

11

,30

6 12

,26

4

11

,73

2

12

,09

7

13

,62

9

14

,26

3

12

,49

8 13

,36

5

13

,20

8 14

,07

4

9,000

12,000

15,000Q

1 2

01

4

Q2

20

14

Q3

20

14

Q4

20

14

Q1

20

15

Q2

20

15

Q3

20

15

Q4

20

15

Q1

20

16

Q2

20

16

Q3

20

16

Q4

20

16

Q1

20

17

Q2

20

17

Q3

20

17

Q4

20

17

Q1

20

18

Q2

20

18

Nu

mb

er

of

refe

rra

ls

Referrals by Quarter

Total Referrals

6,2

12

6,4

66

5,8

97

6,3

79

6,2

23

6,3

34

6,3

16

6,4

88

6,7

54

7,2

29

7,1

45

7,1

84 8,1

71 9

,26

4

7,7

32

8,0

51

7,9

01

7,5

75

4,6

41

4,9

84

4,4

87

4,5

64

4,7

70

4,5

65

4,3

95

4,5

05

4,5

52

5,0

35

4,5

87

4,9

13

5,4

58

4,9

99

4,7

66

5,3

14

5,3

07 6

,49

9

2,000

4,000

6,000

8,000

10,000

Q1

20

14

Q2

20

14

Q3

20

14

Q4

20

14

Q1

20

15

Q2

20

15

Q3

20

15

Q4

20

15

Q1

20

16

Q2

20

16

Q3

20

16

Q4

20

16

Q1

20

17

Q2

20

17

Q3

20

17

Q4

20

17

Q1

20

18

Q2

20

18

Nu

mb

er

of

refe

rra

ls

Referrals by Type and Quarter

Welfare Abuse

DSCDSE/W

WDSW/K/WW

Midlands

DNCDublinNorth

LH/MH

CN/MN

Cork KerryCW/KK/ST

WD/WX

MidWest

GY/RN MayoDoneg

alSO/LM

/WC

Q1 2016 495 548 743 1,217 686 927 737 234 1,431 300 567 987 1,039 759 212 252 172

Q2 2016 403 524 704 1,432 788 1,116 852 273 1,604 294 694 1,082 1,021 901 164 191 221

Q3 2016 377 519 802 1,385 656 1,063 800 290 1,434 259 799 930 1,012 787 207 231 181

Q4 2016 454 425 838 1,401 609 1,218 706 229 1,439 304 855 1,007 1,085 806 276 248 197

Q1 2017 491 589 764 1,906 692 1,197 867 329 1,572 325 900 1,131 1,069 1,010 231 261 295

Q2 2017 484 571 873 2,025 642 1,069 791 300 1,726 317 908 1,255 1,255 1,025 242 465 315

Q3 2017 553 490 599 1,633 633 868 833 352 1,595 286 890 1,121 977 837 222 396 213

Q4 2017 778 511 765 1,806 683 997 760 310 1,600 363 841 1,171 1,107 866 236 347 224

Q1 2018 569 563 730 1,791 806 839 1,033 494 1,667 258 819 1,147 1,052 709 277 219 235

Q2 2018 449 554 1,029 1,640 769 829 993 468 1,748 286 976 1,249 1,350 938 296 219 281

Diff Q2 v Q1 -120 -9 299 -151 -37 -10 -40 -26 81 28 157 102 298 229 19 0 46

0

500

1,000

1,500

2,000

2,500

Nu

mb

er o

f re

ferr

als

Page 12: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

12

Rate of Referrals

14,074 referrals equates to about 12 referrals per 1,000 population under 18 years. It should

be noted that more than one referral can be received in relation to a child (i.e., for separate

incidents) and as a result the number of children involved is likely to be fewer than the

number of referrals.

Midlands area reported the highest rate of referrals for Q2 2018 at 20.5/1,000 children, 1.7

times the national rate. The lowest rate was reported by Donegal (5.1/1,000).

8 areas (Midlands, Dublin North City, CN/MN, Cork, CW/KK/ST, WD/WX, Midwest, SLWC)

reported a rate higher than the national rate of 11.8/1,000 population under 18 years.

Rate of referrals

Area # Q2 2017 Q1 2018 # Q2 2018 +/- Q2 2018 v

Q1 2018 Population Rate Q2

2018

DSC 484 569 449 -120 65,564 6.8

DSE/WW 571 563 554 -9 86,810 6.4

DSW/K/WW 873 730 1,029 299 108,186 9.5

Midlands 2,025 1,791 1,640 -151 80,193 20.5

DNC 642 806 769 -37 44,927 17.1

Dublin North 1,069 839 829 -10 100,654 8.2

LH/MH 791 1,033 993 -40 93,093 10.7

CN/MN 300 494 468 -26 36,446 12.8

Cork 1,726 1,667 1,748 81 134,015 13.0

Kerry 317 258 286 28 34,527 8.3

CW/KK/ST 908 819 976 157 63,009 15.5

WD/WX 1,255 1,147 (partial) 1,249* 102 68,513 18.2

MidWest 1,255 1,052 1,350 298 96,266 14.0

GY/RN 1,025 709 938 229 79,912 11.7

Mayo 242 277 296 19 31,968 9.3

Donegal 465 219 219 0 42,865 5.1

SLWC 315 235 281 46 23,554 11.9

National 14,263 13,208 14074 866 1,190,502 11.8

CSO Census 2016

* Q2 2018 data for WD/WX are undergoing validation – revised data to be included in the Q4 2018 report

Referrals by Area and Type

An area breakdown of referrals by type (abuse / welfare) for Q2 2018 is presented in the chart

below.

Nationally, there was 46:54 split between referrals of abuse/neglect and welfare. This varied

across the areas and ranged from a 73:27 split for LH/MH to a 26:74 split for the Midlands

area. Eight areas reported a percentage higher than the national average of 40% for abuse.

Page 13: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

13

Breakdown of referrals by type and area Q2 2018

* Data for WD/WX are undergoing validation – revised data to be included in the Q4 2018 report

Preliminary Enquiry and Initial Assessment

Tusla introduced a new national approach to practice (Signs of Safety) on the 5th February 2018. This

new approach introduced some new changes to the preliminary enquiry and initial assessment steps

of the referral process.

The purpose of the Preliminary Enquiry as defined under the new approach is: -

To gather and consider relevant information regarding a reported concern about child.

To consider the immediate safety of a child and to take necessary immediate protective

action, if required.

To examine all information held by Tusla and determine whether the report meets the

threshold for harm for child protection and welfare social work services and to divert cases

where this threshold is not met.

To decide the primary report type and priority status of accepted reports and to respond to

these accepted reports in a proportionate and timely manner.

The outcome of this step will be either:

1. An Initial Assessment is required

2. The case can be appropriately diverted for an alternative response through the Child and

Family Support Networks.

3. The case will be closed with no further action.

Timeline for the preliminary enquiry is 5 days.

The purpose of the Initial Assessment is to determine:

If the referral is a child protection or serious child welfare matter than requires either a Child

Welfare Safety Plan; a Child Protection Safety Plan or whether the harm to the child is at a

DSCDSE/WW

DSW/K/W

W

Midlands

DNCDubli

nNorth

LH/MH

CN/MN

Cork KerryCW/KK/ST

WD/WX

MidWest

GY/RN

MayoDone

galSLWC

Abuse 279 295 352 432 280 502 728 193 955 119 374 614 645 362 175 79 115

Welfare 170 259 677 1208 489 327 265 275 793 167 602 635 705 576 121 140 166

% abuse 62% 53% 34% 26% 36% 61% 73% 41% 55% 42% 38% 49% 48% 39% 59% 36% 41%

% Welfare 38% 47% 66% 74% 64% 39% 27% 59% 45% 58% 62% 51% 52% 61% 41% 64% 59%

0

200

400

600

800

1000

1200

1400N

um

be

r o

f re

ferr

als

Page 14: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

14

level where the children should be removed from the care of their parents until such time as

a safety plan can be established.

If the referral can be closed or diverted to an early intervention response that doesn’t require

Tusla Social Work intervention and can be diverted to a needs led approach like Meitheal.

The timeline for the Initial Assessment is 40 days from receipt of the referral.

Due to these changes the data presented below are not directly comparable with data previously

reported.

98% (n=13,850) of referrals for Q2 2018 had a preliminary enquiry carried out.

A preliminary enquiry was carried out on all referrals (Q2 2018) in 10/17 areas. The

percentage reported by CN/MN (72%) is significantly lower than all other areas.

*Data for WD/WX are undergoing validation – revised data to be included in the Q4 2018 report

39% (5,459) of preliminary enquiries were done within 5 days. Percentage based on data from

16/17 areas – data not available from Dublin North City.

98% 97% 98% 99% 97% 98%

0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

Q1 2017 Q2 2017 Q3 2017 Q4 2017 Q1 2018 Q2 2018

% of Referrals with a PE carried out

% of referrals with a PE carried out

97% 99%

72%

98% 99% 99% 93%

0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

% of Referrals with a PE carried out by Area

New practice model (Signs of Safety)

introduced 05 Feb2018

Page 15: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

15

The percentage of preliminary enquiries done within 5 days ranged from 100% in two areas

(LH/MH and CN/MN) to 6% (17/286) in Kerry. Seven areas reported a percentage above the

national average of 39%.

*Data for WD/WX are undergoing validation – revised data to be included in the Q4 2018 report

24% (n=3,274) of referrals that had a preliminary enquiry required an initial assessment.

The percentage of referrals requiring an initial assessment following a preliminary enquiry

ranged from 65% (665/1,029) in DSW/K/WW to 2% (28/1,631) in the Midlands. Six areas

reported a percentage higher than the national average of 24%.

28%33%

42%

50%44%

100%100%

18%

6%12%

36%

76%

10%14%

17%

43%

0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

% PEs done within 5 days

40%34% 36% 33% 32%

24%

0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

Q1 2017 Q2 2017 Q3 2017 Q4 2017 Q1 2018 Q2 2018

% Referrals that required an IA following PE

% that required an IA following PE

New practice model (Signs of

Safety) introduced 05 Feb2018

Page 16: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

16

* Data for WD/WX are undergoing validation – revised data to be included in the Q4 2018 report

28% (907/3,274) of initial assessments were done within 40 days. Percentage based on data

from 16/17 areas – data not available from Dublin North City.

The percentage of initial assessments done within 40 days ranged from 54% (15/28) in the

Midlands (the area with the lowest percentage requiring an IA) area to 0% (0/14) in CN/MN.

Seven areas reported a percentage above the national average of 28%.

* Data for WD/WX are undergoing validation – revised data to be included in the Q4 2018 report

27%

19%

65%

2%

52% 53%

21%

4%

19% 20%

5%8%

34%

15%

24%29%

12%

0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

Pe

rce

nat

ge o

f re

ferr

als

% of Referrals that required an IA by Area, Q2 2018

7%

25%

51% 54%

31%

48%

0%8%

3%

29%34% 34%

15%22%

13%

23%

0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

% of IAs done within 40 days

Page 17: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

17

Summary table

#

Referrals

# PE % PE # within

5 days % within

5 days

# requirin

g IA

% requirin

g IA

# within 40 days

% within 40 days

DSC 449 449 100% 125 28% 121 27% 8 7%

DSE/WW 554 535 97% 179 33% 102 19% 26 25%

DSW/K/WW 1,029 1,029 100% 429 42% 665 65% 341 51%

Midlands 1,640 1,631 99% 816 50% 28 2% 15 54%

DNC 769 769 100% 401 52%

Dublin North 829 829 100% 361 44% 442 53% 138 31%

LH/MH 993 993 100% 993 100% 205 21% 99 48%

CN/MN 468 338 72% 338 100% 14 4% 0 0%

Cork 1,748 1,748 100% 317 18% 338 19% 28 8%

Kerry 286 286 100% 17 6% 58 20% 2 3%

CW/K/ST 976 957 98% 118 12% 45 5% 13 29%

WD/WX* 1,249 1,234 99% 448 36% 97 8% 33 34%

Mid West 1,350 1,350 100% 1030 76% 459 34% 154 34%

GY/RN 938 928 99% 92 10% 135 15% 20 15%

Mayo 296 274 93% 37 14% 65 24% 14 22%

Donegal 219 219 100% 37 17% 64 29% 8 13%

SLWC 281 281 100% 122 43% 35 12% 8 23%

National 14,074 13,850 98% 5,459 39% 3,274 24% 907 28%

*Q2 2018 data for WD/WX undergoing validation

The outcome of initial assessment was recorded for 1,651 referrals (Q2 2018).

‘No further action’ was recorded in 39% (651/1,651) of cases.

“Child protection” was recorded for just over one in ten cases (13%; 219) while 30 (2%) children

required admission to care.

Some 5% (75) cases were diverted for an early intervention response. Majority (65) reported

by DSW/K/WW.

Breakdown of actions recorded following initial assessment

310; 36%

147; 17%57;

7%

213; 25%

5, 1%

18, 2%

4, 0%

100; 12%

Abuse/Neglect

No further Action

Child Protection

Child Welfare/Family Support

Further Assessment

Family Welfare Conference

Admission to care

Divert to Early Intervention

Divert to Another Agency

341; 43%

72; 9%86; 11%

97; 12%

1, 0%

12, 1% 71; 9%

117; 15%

Welfare

No further Action

Child Protection

Child Welfare/Family Support

Further Assessment

Family Welfare Conference

Admission to care

Divert to Early Intervention

Divert to Another Agency

651; 39%

219; 13%143; 9%

310; 19%

6, 0%

30, 2%

75, 5% 217; 13%

Total

No further Action

Child Protection

Child Welfare/Family Support

Further Assessment

Family Welfare Conference

Admission to care

Divert to Early Intervention

Divert to Another Agency

Page 18: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

18

2.2 SOCIAL WORK ACTIVITY DATA (Child Protection & Welfare)

2.2.1 Open Cases

25,696 cases open2 to social work nationally at the end of Q3 2018; 558 (2%) more than Q2

2018 and 223 fewer than Q3 2017.

Number of open cases by quarter

*Note: data for Q1 2018 based on complete returns from 16/17 areas and a partial return from the remaining area

(Waterford/Wexford)

The number of open of cases ranged from 3,756 (15%) in Dublin North to 363 (less than 2%)

in Sligo/Leitrim/West Cavan with an average of 1,512 per area. Eleven of the 17 areas had

between 1,000 and 2,000 cases; four areas had fewer than 1,000 cases while the remaining

two areas (Dublin North and Cork) had in excess of 3,000 cases.

Seven areas reported an increase in open cases from Q2 2018. The highest increase was

reported by Dublin North (up 704) followed by Cork (up 484), Dublin North City (up 137),

CN/MN (up 60), DSW/K/WW (up 53), LH/MH (up 38) and Dublin South East Wicklow 9up

8).

2 Open cases include cases held on intake, allocated, unallocated child welfare and protection and children in care cases.

25,36225,034

25,384

25,866 25,919

24,89124,579

25,138

25,696

22,000

23,000

24,000

25,000

26,000

27,000

Q32016

Q42016

Q1 2017

Q2 2017

Q32017

Q42017

Q12018

Q22018

Q3 2018

Nu

mb

er

of

op

en

cas

es

Key Facts

25,696 cases open to social work at the end of Q3 2018; 558 (2%) more than Q2 2018 and

223 fewer than Q3 2017

77% (n=19,716) of open cases allocated to named social worker; no change from Q2 2018

5,980 cases were awaiting allocation; 124 (2%) more than Q2 2018 (5,856) and 696 (13%)

more than Q3 2017 (5,284).

829 (14%) of the cases awaiting allocation at the end of Q3 2018 were categorised as ‘high

priority’; 158 (16%) fewer than Q2 2018 and 137 (14%) fewer than Q3 2017

54% (n=3,213) of all cases awaiting allocation at the end of Q3 2018 were waiting less than 3

months.

Page 19: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

19

WD/WX reported the greatest decrease (down 369) followed by CW/KK/ST (down 214),

MidWest (down 162), Dublin South Central (down 48), Donegal (down 48), GY/RN (down

41), Midlands (down 27), Mayo (down 14) and SLWC (down 3).

Number of open cases by area

2.2.2 Open Cases Allocated / Awaiting Allocation

77% (n=19,716/25,696) of open cases were allocated to a named social worker at the end of

Q3 2018; no change from Q2 2018.

5,980 (23%) cases were awaiting allocation; 124 (2%) more than Q2 2018 (5,856) and 696

(13%) more than Q3 2017 (5,284). At least 19% (n=1,122) of cases awaiting allocation were

“active” on a duty system3. Figure (1,122) based on returns from 13 areas

Cases allocated/awaiting allocation

3 A case awaiting allocation may be “active” on a “duty” system. This means that there are actions being undertaken by a dedicated

duty team or rotating social workers on a duty roster to progress the protection and welfare of the child. Examples of actions being

undertaken include telephone calls relating to the concern, visits to see children, completing initial assessments and child in care reviews

or care plans. The actions undertaken must have occurred within the monthly MTP reporting period. There must be evidence of actions

progressing the protection and welfare of the child and not simply a management review of a file. These cases will form a separate

category on the MTP returns template under cases awaiting allocation.

DSCDSE/WW

DSW/K/WW

Midlands

DNCDub

NorthLH/M

HCN/M

NCork Kerry

CW/KK/ST

WD/WX

MidWest

GY/RN MayoDoneg

alSLWC

Q3 2017 1,280 1,021 1,970 1,487 1,992 3,176 1,610 663 3,612 607 1,445 1,785 1,481 1,533 562 1,304 391

Q4 2017 1,279 1,016 1,617 1,423 1,824 3,085 1,347 678 3,369 583 1,688 1,641 1,486 1,672 566 1,243 374

Q1 2018 1,377 1,021 1,527 1,428 1,832 2,946 1,246 717 3,329 561 1,649 1,674 1,428 1,849 455 1,149 391

Q2 2018 1,863 1,026 1,324 1,445 1,533 3,052 1,357 750 3,257 589 1,793 2,043 1,613 1,626 451 1,050 366

Q3 2018 1,815 1,034 1,377 1,418 1,670 3,756 1,395 810 3,741 589 1,579 1,674 1,451 1,585 437 1,002 363

Q3 v Q2 -48 8 53 -27 137 704 38 60 484 0 -214 -369 -162 -41 -14 -48 -3

0

500

1,000

1,500

2,000

2,500

3,000

3,500

4,000

Op

en

cas

es

83%78%

76% 77% 80% 80% 81%77% 77%

17%22%

24% 23% 20% 20% 19%23% 23%

0.0%

20.0%

40.0%

60.0%

80.0%

100.0%

Q32016

Q42016

Q1 2017

Q2 2017

Q32017

Q42017

Q12018

Q22018

Q3 2018

% o

f o

pe

n c

ase

s

% Allocated % Awaiting Allocation

21,00119,621 19,226

19,973 20,635 19,999 19,890 19,282 19,716

4,3615,413

6,158 5,893 5,284 4,892 4,6895,856 5,980

0

5,000

10,000

15,000

20,000

25,000

Q3

2016

Q4

2016

Q1

2017

Q2

2017

Q3

2017

Q4

2017

Q1

2018

Q2

2018

Q3

2018

Nu

mb

er

of

op

en

ca

ses

No allocated No Awaiting Allocation

Page 20: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

20

Dublin North reported the highest number of cases awaiting allocation (n=1,131) followed

by Dublin South Central (n=814), CW/KK/ST (n=625), DSW/K/WW (n=603) and Cork

(484).

Eight areas reported a decrease from Q2 2018 in the number of cases awaiting allocation.

MidWest reported the greatest decrease (down 163; 46%) followed by Midlands (down 152;

29%), WD/WX (down 121; 24%) and CW/KK/ST (down 114; 15%).

Nine areas reported an increase from Q2 2018. The highest increase was reported by Dublin

North (up 346; 44%) followed by Dublin South Central (up 139; 21%) and Donegal (up 90;

43%).

Number of open cases awaiting allocation by area

2.2.3 Cases Awaiting Allocation by Priority Level4

829 (14%) of the cases awaiting allocation at the end of Q3 2018 were categorised as ‘high

priority’; 158 (16%) fewer than Q2 2018 and 137 (14%) fewer than Q3 2017.

52% of cases (n=3,113) awaiting allocation at the end of Q3 2018 were categorised as ‘medium

priority’ while the remaining 34% (n=2,038) were categorised as ‘low priority’.

4 The priority level as per the guidance outlined in ‘Measuring the Pressure’ V2. Note: The priority levels in this

guidance are currently under national review to ensure that the priority levels identified equate with categorisation of

risk. A recent national review highlighted cases being categorised in accordance with actual risk rather than the priority

levels in the “Measuring the Pressure” V2.

DSCDSE/WW

DSW/K/W

W

Midlands

DNCDubNth

LH/MH

CN/MN

Cork KerryCW/KK/ST

WD/WX

MidWest

GY/RN

MayoDone

galSLWC

Q3 2017 281 113 934 282 360 384 272 245 494 82 355 306 271 224 0 638 43

Q4 2017 302 115 654 283 358 455 264 212 593 93 354 218 279 180 0 476 56

Q1 2018 136 124 647 345 384 432 273 189 622 90 448 95 246 249 0 372 37

Q2 2018 675 192 580 523 216 785 186 174 439 79 739 498 353 163 2 208 44

Q3 2018 814 172 603 371 173 1,131 228 176 484 119 625 377 190 199 0 298 20

Q3 v Q2 139 -20 23 -152 -43 346 42 2 45 40 -114 -121 -163 36 -2 90 -24

0

200

400

600

800

1000

1200

Cas

es

awai

tin

g al

loca

tio

n

Page 21: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

21

Cases awaiting allocation by priority level

Dublin South West/Kildare/West Wicklow reported the highest number (n=158) of ‘high

priority’ cases awaiting allocation, followed by Cork (n=140) and Donegal (n=87).

Dublin South Central, the area with the second highest number of cases awaiting

allocation reported no ‘high priority’ cases awaiting allocation.

Area breakdown of cases awaiting allocation by priority level, Q3 2018

2.2.4 Cases Awaiting Allocation by Waiting Time

61% (n=503/829) of cases categorised as ‘high priority’ awaiting allocation at the end of Q3

2018 were waiting less than 3 months.

48% (n=1,507/3,113) of cases categorised as ‘medium priority’ were waiting less than 3

months at the end of Q3 2018.

576801

1,062 991 966818 734

987829

2,661

3,262

3,5823,720

3,309

2,925 2,971

3,2803,113

1,1241,350

1,514

1,1821,009

1,149984

1,589

2,038

0

500

1,000

1,500

2,000

2,500

3,000

3,500

4,000

Q32016

Q42016

Q12017

Q22017

Q32017

Q42017

Q12018

Q22018

Q32018

Cas

es

awai

tin

g al

loca

tio

n

High Priority Medium Priority Low Priority

DSCDSE/WW

DSW/K/

WW

Midlands

DNC

Dublin

North

LH/MH

CN/MN

CorkKerr

y

CW/KK/S

T

WD/WX

MidWes

t

GY/RN

Mayo

Donegal

SLWC

High Priority 0 15 158 86 1 6 16 8 140 59 51 83 75 38 0 87 6

Medium Priority 316 72 361 205 124 607 175 133 206 47 325 198 79 104 0 150 11

Low Priority 498 85 84 80 48 518 37 35 138 13 249 96 36 57 0 61 3

Total 814 172 603 371 173 1131 228 176 484 119 625 377 190 199 0 298 20

0

200

400

600

800

1000

1200

Nu

mb

er

of

case

s aw

aiit

ng

allo

cati

on

Page 22: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

22

59% (n=1,203/2,038) of cases categorised as ‘low priority’ were waiting less than 3 months

at the end of Q3 2018.

54% (n=3,213) of all cases awaiting allocation at the end of Q3 2018 were waiting less than 3

months.

Breakdown of cases awaiting allocation by priority level and time waiting

High Priority / Time Waiting Q3 2017

Q4 2017 Based on data from

15/17 areas

Q1 2018 Based on data from

14/17 areas

Q2 2018 Q3 2018

<1 month 367 196 250 421 259

1-3 months 242 189 158 249 244

>3 months 357 346 274 317 326

Total 966 731 682 987 829

Medium Priority / Time Waiting Q3 2017

Q4 2017 Based on data from

15/17 areas

Q1 2018 Based on data from

14/17 areas

Q2 2018

Q3 2018

<1 month 931 623 923 958 560

1-3 months 811 717 607 999 947

>3 months 1,567 1,248 1,126 1,323 1606

Total 3,309 2,588 2,656 3,280 3,113

Low Priority / Time Waiting Q3 2017

Q4 2017 Based on data from

15/17 areas

Q1 2018 Based on data from

14/17 areas

Q2 2018

Q3 2018

<1 month 256 167 187 394 579

1-3 months 180 355 164 624 624

>3 months 573 519 496 571 835

Total 1,009 1,041 847 1,589 2,038

Page 23: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

23

2.3 CHILD PROTECTION NOTIFICATION SYSTEM

1,169 children listed as ‘active’ on the Child Protection Notification System (CPNS)5 at the end

of Q3 2018; 74 more than Q2 2018 and 233 (17%) fewer than Q3 2017. This is the first

increase after three consecutive decreases.

Number of children listed as 'Active' on the CPNS, by quarter

Note: data presented does not include children listed on the CPNS as visiting from another jurisdiction where there is a comparable system in place and where the child is listed on that system.

The number listed as “active” equates to about 10 children per 10,000 population under 18

years and ranges from 3/10,000 population in DSW/K/WW to 18/10,000 in Dublin North

City and Mayo.

Cork, DSW/K/WW and Dublin North with the higher proportions of the under 18 population

reported some of the lowest rates and fall well below the national average.

Kerry and Mayo with smaller proportions of the under 18 population reported rates above

the national average.

MidWest reported the highest number (n=119) of children “active”, followed by Cork (n=103)

and LH/MH (n=100). Sligo/Leitrim/West Cavan reported the fewest number (n=16).

5 The CPNS, in accordance with the Children First: National Guidance for the Protection and Welfare of Children,

2011, is a national record of all children who are the subject of a child protection plan agreed at a child protection

conference. The CPNS is accessible to named professional groups subject to strict protocols.

1,3161,356

1,402

1,3041,250

1,095

1,169

500

700

900

1,100

1,300

1,500

Q1 2017 Q2 2017 Q3 2017 Q4 2017 Q1 2018 Q2 2018 Q3 2018

Nu

mb

er

of

child

ren

KEY FACTS

1,169 children listed as ‘active’ on the CPNS at the end of Q3 2018; 74 more than Q2 2018

and 233 fewer than Q3 2017

86% (1,003) of children listed as “active” were listed for no longer than 18 months

All children listed as “active” at the end of Q3 2018 had an allocated social worker.

Page 24: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

24

Children listed as 'active' on CPNS per 10,000 population 0-17 years

Area #

Q3 2018 Population 0-17

years Rate / 10,000 pop

DSC 76 65,564 12

DSE/WW 36 86,810 4

DSW/K/WW 35 108,186 3

Midlands 85 80,193 11

Dublin North City 79 44,927 18

Dublin North 86 100,654 9

LH/MH 100 93,093 11

CN/MN 23 36,446 6

Cork 103 134,015 8

Kerry 42 34,527 12

CW/KK/ST 83 63,009 13

WD/WX 93 68,513 14

Mid West 119 96,266 12

GY/RN 84 79,912 11

Mayo 57 31,968 18

Donegal 52 42,865 12

SLWC 16 23,554 7

National 1,169 1,190,502 10

Population: Census 2016

11/17 areas reported an increase from Q2 2018. The largest increase was reported by Donegal (up

26) followed by Mayo (up 21), Cork (up 16) and Dublin North (up 14). Three areas had more

cases “active” at the end of Q3 2018 than Q3 2017; Dublin South Central (up 7), Dublin North City

(up 5) and Dublin North (up 16).

Six areas reported a decrease from Q2 2018. The largest decrease was reported by CW/KK/ST

(down 12) followed Midlands (down 6) and WD/WX (down 5). 14/17 areas had fewer cases

“active” at the end of Q3 2018 than Q3 2017. Largest decrease reported by Midwest (down 85)

followed by LH/MH (down 38), DSW/K/WW (down 24) and Dublin South East/Wicklow (down

22).

Number of children listed as "active" by area, by quarter

DSCDSE/WW

DSW/K/WW

Midlands

DNCDubli

nNorth

LH/MH

CN/MN

Cork KerryCW/KK/ST

WD/WX

MidWest

GY/RN

MayoDone

galSLWC

Q2 2017 89 58 69 77 74 71 136 24 95 34 83 110 206 71 59 63 37

Q3 2017 69 58 59 86 74 70 138 28 108 48 101 104 204 91 64 67 33

Q4 2017 63 52 52 83 78 73 115 23 126 48 88 110 169 88 52 60 24

Q1 2018 59 46 49 92 81 77 97 23 114 46 76 125 153 97 48 51 16

Q2 2018 68 33 36 91 74 72 101 20 87 41 95 98 117 85 36 26 15

Q3 2018 76 36 35 85 79 86 100 23 103 42 83 93 119 84 57 52 16

Q3 v Q2 8 3 -1 -6 5 14 -1 3 16 1 -12 -5 2 -1 21 26 1

0

40

80

120

160

200

240

Nu

mb

er

"act

ive

"

Page 25: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

25

47% (n=550) of children listed as “active” at the end of Q3 2018 were listed for 0-6 months;

24% (n=275) were listed for 7-12 months; 15% (n=178) were listed for 12-18 months; 6%

(n=75) were listed for 18-24 months while the remaining 8% (n=91) were listed for longer

than 24 months.

Listed for > 24 months: Highest percentage (32%; n=24/76) reported by Dublin South

Central. Six areas reported a percentage higher than the national average of 8% as follows

DSC 32%; GY/RN 17%; Dublin North City 14%, LH/MH 12%; Cork 9% and Mayo 9%). Six

areas (DSE/WW, CN/MN, Kerry, WD/WX, Donegal and SLWC) reported no child listed as

active for >24 months. CN/MN and Donegal had no child listed as “active” for longer than

18 months.

Listed for < 6 months: Highest percentage (67%; n=35/52) reported by Donegal followed by

CW/KK/ST (59%; n=49/83), Midwest (54%; n=64/119), DSE/WW (53%; n=19/36), GY/RN

(52%; n=44/84) and DSW/K/WW (51%; n=18/35). Lowest percentage (25%) reported by

SLWC (n=4/16) followed by Midlands (33%; n=28/85) and Dublin North City (33%;

n=26/79). Eleven areas reported a percentage equal to or higher than the national average

of 47%.

Children listed as 'active' in each area at the end of Q3 2018, by length of time ‘active’

0-6 %

0-6 7-12 %

7-12 12-18 %

12-18 18-24 %

18-24 >24 %

> 24 Total

DSC 29 38% 15 20% 3 4% 5 7% 24 32% 76

DSE/WW 19 53% 12 33% 1 3% 4 11% 0 0% 36

DSW/K/WW 18 51% 13 37% 1 3% 2 6% 1 3% 35

Midlands 28 33% 33 39% 23 27% 0 0% 1 1% 85

DNC 26 33% 29 37% 11 14% 2 3% 11 14% 79

Dublin North 42 49% 27 31% 11 13% 0 0% 6 7% 86

LH/MH 47 47% 20 20% 14 14% 7 7% 12 12% 100

CN/MN 11 48% 10 43% 2 9% 0 0% 0 0% 23

Cork 52 50% 18 17% 16 16% 8 8% 9 9% 103

Kerry 15 36% 7 17% 14 33% 6 14% 0 0% 42

CW/KK/ST 49 59% 15 18% 11 13% 6 7% 2 2% 83

WD/WX 40 43% 22 24% 21 23% 10 11% 0 0% 93

Mid West 64 54% 22 18% 14 12% 13 11% 6 5% 119

GY/RN 44 52% 14 17% 11 13% 1 1% 14 17% 84

Mayo 27 47% 7 12% 13 23% 5 9% 5 9% 57

Donegal 35 67% 5 10% 12 23% 0 0% 0 0% 52

SLWC 4 25% 6 38% 0 0% 6 38% 0 0% 16

National 550 47% 275 24% 178 15% 75 6% 91 8% 1,169

All children listed as “active” at the end of Q3 2018 had an allocated social worker.

41 children listed as active at the end of Q3 2018 were reactivated on the CPNS (i.e., their

status changed from ‘inactive’ to ‘active’) during Q3 2018. Mayo reported the highest number

(n=9) of children who were reactivated followed by Dublin North (n=7) and Donegal (n=7).

Eight areas reported had no children active who were reactivated during the quarter.

Page 26: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

26

Number children active at end of Sept 2018 whose status changed from inactive to active during Q3 2018

Area

# Children whose status changed

Q1 2018

# Children whose status changed

Q2 2018

# Children whose status changed

Q2 2018

DSC 1 10 4

DSE/WW 0 0 0

DSW/K/WW 1 0 2

Midlands 2 2 0

Dublin North City 0 0 4

Dublin North 2 1 7

LH/MH 3 8 2

CN/MN 0 0 0

Cork 0 0 1

Kerry 0 0 0

CW/KK/ST 2 12 0

WD/WX 0 0 0

Mid West 8 6 5

GY/RN 0 0 0

Mayo 0 0 9

Donegal 0 0 7

SLWC 0 0 0

National 19 39 41

Page 27: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

27

2.4 EMERGENCY OUT OF HOURS SOCIAL WORK SERVICE / CRISIS INTERVENTION SERVICE

255 referrals to the Crisis Intervention Service (CIS)6 during Q3 2018; four more than Q2

2018 and nine more than Q3 2017.

80 children were placed with the CIS during Q3 2018; eight more than Q2 2018 and three

fewer than Q3 2017.

695 nights’ accommodation was supplied by the CIS (i.e., count of the number of nights

children spent in emergency accommodation) during Q3 2018.

Referrals to the Crisis Intervention Service by quarter

6 The CIS provides an out-of-hours emergency social work service to young people aged under 18 years who are in crisis.

The service operates across the greater Dublin area (Counties Dublin, Kildare and Wicklow). Referrals are made by

service providers outside of normal working hours i.e. Gardaí, hospital and ambulance service personnel

8369

97

7280

246

225

267251 255

0

50

100

150

200

250

300

Q3 2017 Q4 2017 Q1 2018 Q2 2018 Q3 2018

No. of children placed No of referrals

KEY FACTS

255 referrals to the Crisis Intervention Service (CIS) in Q3 2018; four more than Q2 2018

and nine more than Q3 2017.

80 children were placed with the CIS during Q3 2018; eight more than Q2 2018 and three

fewer than Q3 2017

256 referrals to the Emergency Out of Hours Social Work Service (EOHS) in Q3 2018; 38

more than Q2 2018 and the highest number for all quarters Q3 2017 – Q3 2018

72 children were placed by the EHOS during Q2 2018; two fewer than Q2 2018 and five

more than Q3 2017.

Page 28: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

28

256 referrals to the Emergency out of Hours Social Work Service (EOHS)7 8 during Q3

2018; 38 more than Q2 2018 and the highest number for all quarters Q3 2017 – Q3 2018

72 children were placed by the EHOS during Q3 2018; two fewer than Q2 2018 and five

more than Q3 2017.

196 nights’ accommodation were supplied (i.e., count of the number of nights children

spent in emergency accommodation) during Q3 2018.

Referrals to the Emergency Out of Hours Social Work Service by quarter

7 Emergency Out-of-Hours Social Work Service (EOHS) operates outside of Dublin, Wicklow and Kildare. This service builds on the

placement only service (referred to as the Emergency place of Safety Service) that was previously in place. The service is available

Monday to Sunday between 6 pm and 7 am and each Saturday, Sunday and Bank Holiday from 9 am to 5 pm. The EOHS was set up

to co-operate with and support An Garda Síochána in the execution of their duties and responsibilities under section 12(3) of the Child

Care Act 19917 and referrals made under section 8(5) of the Refugee Act 1996.

8 The HSE established emergency out of hours social work pilot projects in Cork and Donegal in 2011. The Cork pilot service continues to operate.

67 69 6274 72

181 186168

218

256

0

50

100

150

200

250

300

Q3 2017 Q4 2017 Q1 2018 Q2 2018 Q3 2018

No. of children placed No of referrals

Page 29: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

3.0 ALTERNATIVE CARE SERVICES

KEY AREAS OF FOCUS

3.1 Children in Care (Foster Care / Residential Care)

3.2 Aftercare

3.3 Adoption

3.4 Foster Carers

3.1 CHILDREN IN CARE (FOSTER CARE / RESIDENTIAL CARE)

3.1.1 Number of Children in Care

6,072 children in care at the end of Q3 2018; 60 fewer than Q2 2018 and 158 (3%) fewer than

Q3 2017. This figure (6,072) includes 65 children under the Social Work Team for Separated

Children Seeking Asylum (SWTSCSA); one fewer than Q2 2018.

Number of children in care by quarter, Q1 2017 – Q3 2018

6,308 6,2976,230

6,1906,153 6,132

6,072

5,500

5,750

6,000

6,250

6,500

Q1 2017 Q2 2017 Q3 2017 Q4 2017 Q1 2018 Q2 2018 Q3 2018

Nu

mb

er

of

child

ren

in c

are

KEY FACTS

6,072 children in care at the end of Q3 2018; 60 fewer than Q2 2018 and 158 (3%) fewer than

Q3 2017.

641 children in private placements; 18 more than Q2 2018 and the highest number for the

period Q1 2017 – Q3 2018.

91% (n=5,507) of children in care had an allocated social worker (against a target of 100%),

down one percentage point on Q2 2018

565 children were awaiting allocation of a social worker; 50 more than Q2 2018

90% (n=5,444) of children in care had an up to date care plan (against a target of 90%), down

one percentage point from Q2 2018.

628 children did not have an up-to-date care plan; 82 more than Q2 2018. One area

(CW/KK/ST) advised that they are validating their data and figures need to be interpreted

with caution.

541 children did not have an up-to-date care plan; 51 more than Q4 2017

Page 30: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

30

Across the 17 areas the number of children in care ranged from 797 in Cork to 111 in

Sligo/Leitrim/West Cavan.

Dublin North City reported the highest rate of children in care per 1,000 population

under 18 years (11.5/1,000) followed by WD/WX (6.3/1,000) and MidWest (6.0/1,000)

while Dublin North reported the lowest rate at 3.1/1,000 population.

Number of children in care and rate per 1,000 population 0-17 years, Q3 2018

Area

0-17 population

(Census 2016)

No CIC

Q3 2018

No of CIC/1,000

population 0-17

DSC 65,564 365 5.6

DSE/WW 86,810 275 3.2

DSW/K/WW 108,186 405 3.7

Midlands 80,193 377 4.7

DNC 44,927 515 11.5

Dublin North 100,654 317 3.1

LH/MH 93,093 405 4.4

CN/MN 36,446 158 4.3

Cork 134,015 797 5.9

Kerry 34,527 164 4.7

CW/KK/ST 63,009 356 5.6

WD/WX 68,513 430 6.3

Mid West 96,266 582 6.0

GY/RN 79,912 412 5.2

Mayo 31,968 128 4.0

Donegal 42,865 210 4.9

SLWC 23,554 111 4.7

Total 1,190,502 6,007 5.0

11 areas along with the SWTSCSA reported a decrease in children in care from Q2 2018.

Greatest decrease reported by Dublin North City (down 15) and MidWest, both down

15 followed by DSW/K/WW (down 13) and Dublin North (down 7)

Four areas reported an increase in children in care from Q2 2018. Highest increase was

reported by Kerry (up 5). CW/KK/ST and LH/MH reported no change.

11 areas along with the SWTSCSA had fewer children in care at the end of Q3 2018 than

Q3 2017. Greatest decrease reported by Dublin North City (down 71), followed by

DSW/K/WW (down 30), Cork (down 27), Midwest (down 21) and Dublin South Central

(down 14). Of the six remaining areas, WD/WX reported the greatest decreases, down

22 followed by SLWC (down 10).

Page 31: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

31

Breakdown of the number of children in care in each area, Q1 2017 – Q3 2018

3.1.2 Number of Children in Care by Care Type

92% (n=5,602) of children in care were in foster care (general and relative) at the end of Q3

2018 and 6% (n=360) were in a residential (general) placement.

Breakdown of the number of children in care by care type and month, Q1 2017 – Q3 2018

FC

Gen

Δ+/- FC Rel

Δ+/- Res Care Gen

Δ+/- Res Care Spec

Δ+/- Other Care

12

Δ+/- Total

Δ+/-

prev Q prev Q prev Q prev Q prev Q prev Q

Q1 2017 4,133 31 1,686 -29 352 48 10 -2 127 2 6,308 50

Q2 2017 4,106 -27 1,695 9 357 5 11 1 128 1 6,297 -11

Q3 2017 4,053 -53 1,676 -19 351 -6 10 -1 140 +12 6,230 -67

Q4 2017 4,040 -13 1,660 -16 345 -6 12 +2 133 -7 6,190 -40

Q1 2018 4,036 -4 1,629 -31 350 +5 13 +1 125 -8 6,153 -37

Q2 2018 4,057 +21 1,615 -14 349 -1 15 +2 96 -29 6,132 -21

Q3 2018 4,005 -52 1,595 -20 361 +12 13 -2 98 +2 6,072 -60

FC Gen = Foster Care General; FC Rel = Foster Care with Relatives; Res Care Gen = Residential Care General; Res Care Spec = Residential Care Special; CIC = Children in care

Figures for care types for Q4 2017 revised from previously reported

20 (0.33%) children were in out of State placements at the end of Q3 2018; one fewer than

Q2 2018. These children are included in the figures for the various care types set out in the

table above.

Four children in residential care were in a single care placement at the end of Q3 2018; down

one on Q2 2018.

116 children were in respite care (from home) at the end of Q3 2018, 122 in respite care (from

home) at the end of Q2 2018.

DSCDSE/WW

DSW/K/W

W

Midlands

DNC

Dublin

North

LH/MH

CN/MN

Cork KerryCW/KK/S

T

WD/WX

MidWest

GY/RN

Mayo

Donegal

SLWC

SWTSCSA

Q1 2017 394 286 436 399 613 335 396 156 851 155 362 415 593 403 142 214 100 58

Q2 2017 385 282 429 393 602 332 391 156 852 156 371 410 601 417 133 213 107 67

Q3 2017 379 279 435 395 586 322 397 156 824 155 362 408 603 415 134 204 101 75

Q4 2017 374 283 420 388 566 331 398 157 805 151 372 413 596 418 130 200 108 80

Q1 2018 371 277 420 383 540 336 401 157 797 153 363 426 591 421 133 206 104 74

Q2 2018 361 276 418 383 530 324 405 155 799 159 356 433 597 418 131 212 109 66

Q3 2018 365 275 405 377 515 317 405 158 797 164 356 430 582 412 128 210 111 65

Q3 v Q2 4 -1 -13 -6 -15 -7 0 3 -2 5 0 -3 -15 -6 -3 -2 2 -1

0100200300400500600700800900

# ch

ildre

n in

car

e

Page 32: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

32

3.1.3 Children in Private Placements

641 (10.6%) children in care at the end of Q3 2018 were in private placements9; 18 more than

Q2 2018 and the highest number for the period Q1 2017 – Q3 2018. This figure (641) includes

46 children in care under the SWTSCSA, two more than Q2 2018.

Number of children in private placements, Q1 2017 – Q3 2018

61% (n=390) of children in private placements were in private foster care and 35% (n=222)

were in private residential placements.

Number of children in private placements by care type, Q1 2017 – Q3 2018

Dublin South Central (n=101) followed by Dublin North City (n=95), DSW/K/WW (n=66)

and Midlands (n=65) reported the highest number of children in private placements in Q3

2018. Cavan/Monaghan (n=2) reported the fewest number.

Nine areas along with the SWTSCSA reported an increase in private placements from Q2

2018. The highest increase was reported by Dublin South Central (up 6) followed by LH/MH

(up 5) while the greatest decrease was reported by the Midlands (down 6).

9 The number of children in private placements is included in the children in care figures presented in sections 3.1.1 and

3.1.2

613 616

600

614 622623

641

500

550

600

650

700

Q1 2017 Q2 2017 Q3 2017 Q4 2017 Q1 2018 Q2 2018 Q3 2018

Nu

mb

er

of

child

ren

384 384 375395 387 393 390

210 215 208 203219 217 222

19 17 17 16 16 1329

0

50

100

150

200

250

300

350

400

450

Q1 2017 Q2 2017 Q3 2017 Q4 2017 Q1 2018 Q2 2018 Q3 2018

Nu

mb

er

of

child

ren

Private Foster Care Private Residential Care Private Care Other

Page 33: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

33

Twelve areas along with the SWTSCSA had more children in private placements at the end of

Q3 2018 than Q3 2017. The highest increases were reported by DSW/K/WW (up 11) and

Dublin South Central (up 9).

Number of children in private placements by area, Q1 2017 – Q3 2018

Tusla’s Social Work Team for Separated Children Seeking Asylum (n=30), Cork (n=30) and

WD/WX (n=26) reported the highest numbers of children in private residential placements.

Dublin North City reported the highest number of children in private foster care placements

(n=82) followed closely by Dublin South Central (n=81), Midlands (n=57), DSW/K/WW

(n=47) and Dublin North (n=31). Seventy-six percent (n=298/390) of children in private

foster care placements are reported by these five areas.

Galway/Roscommon reported no children in private foster care placements while Mayo and

CN/MN reported no child in a private residential placement.

Number of children in private placements by care type Q3 2018

DSCDSE/WW

DSW/K/

WW

Midlands

DNC

Dublin

North

LH/MH

CN/MN

CorkKerr

y

CW/KK/S

T

WD/WX

MidWes

t

GY/RN

Mayo

Donegal

SLWC

SWTSCSA

Q1 2017 102 39 53 83 94 41 22 2 46 5 12 25 18 9 1 8 5 48

Q2 2017 96 41 55 80 101 45 16 2 47 6 14 29 12 7 4 8 8 45

Q3 2017 92 39 54 77 97 41 18 2 44 7 12 33 14 5 4 9 7 45

Q4 2017 95 43 58 71 93 46 21 2 42 7 14 32 14 5 5 9 6 51

Q1 2018 96 42 59 69 91 51 21 2 44 7 14 30 26 5 5 7 6 47

Q2 2018 95 45 64 71 94 46 16 2 48 8 14 31 18 8 4 11 4 44

Q3 2018 101 43 66 65 95 45 21 2 49 12 14 35 20 10 3 10 4 46

∆ Q3 v Q2 2018 6 -2 2 -6 1 -1 5 0 1 4 0 4 2 2 -1 -1 0 2

0

20

40

60

80

100

120

Nu

mb

er in

pri

vate

pla

cem

ents

DSCDSE/WW

DSW/K/WW

Midland

sDNC

Dublin

North

LH/MH

CN/MN

CorkKerr

y

CW/KK/S

T

WD/WX

MidWes

t

GY/RN

Mayo

Donegal

SLWC

SWTSCSA

Other 5 2 2 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 6 1 0 0 0 9

Residential 15 15 17 8 13 12 7 0 30 8 12 26 11 9 0 7 2 30

Foster Care 81 26 47 57 82 31 13 1 19 4 2 9 3 0 3 3 2 7

Total 101 43 66 65 95 45 21 2 49 12 14 35 20 10 3 10 4 46

0

20

40

60

80

100

120

Page 34: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

34

3.1.4 Children in Care with an Allocated Social Worker

91% (n=5,507/6,072) of children in care nationally had an allocated social worker (against a

target of 100%) at the end of Q3 2018; down one percentage point on Q2 2018.

565 children were awaiting allocation of a social worker; 50 (9%) more than Q2 2018.

Children in care (CIC) with an allocated social worker (SW) by care type

Care Type CIC No with SW % with SW CIC No with SW % with SW

Q2 2018 Q2 2018 Q2 2018 Q3 2018 Q3 2018 Q3 2018

Foster Care (General) 4,057 3,721 92% 4,005 3,633 91%

Foster Care (Relatives) 1,615 1,450 90% 1,595 1,418 89%

Residential Care (General)

349 340 97% 361 347 96%

Residential Special Care 15 15 100% 13 13 100%

Other Placements 96 91 95% 98 96 98%

Total 6,132 5,617 92% 6,072 5,507 91%

Figures for care types for Q4 2017 revised from previously reported

Three areas along with Tusla’s Social Work Team for Separated Children Seeking Asylum met

the target of 100% of children in care with an allocated social worker. A further seven areas

reported a percentage of 95% or higher. Six of the remaining seven areas reported a

percentage below 90% with the poorest performing area (CW/KK/ST) reporting 68%.

Three areas (CW/KK/ST, DSC, LH/MH) reported an increase in performance from Q2 2018

while eight areas reported a decrease, the most notable being DSW/K/WW, down 12

percentage points.

The area with the highest number of children awaiting an allocated social worker is Midwest

(n=122) followed by CW/KK/ST (n=115), DSW/K/WW (n=103) and Midlands (n=73).

Number of children in care with an allocated social worker

Area

No in Care

Q2 2018

No with an

allocated

SW

Q2 2018

% with an

allocated

SW

Q2 2018

No in Care

Q3 2018

No with an

allocated

SW

Q3 2018

% with an

allocated

SW

Q3 2018

+/- Q3 v Q2

2018

DSE/WW 276 276 100% 275 262 95% -5%

DSW/K/WW 418 363 87% 405 302 75% -12%

DSC 361 343 95% 365 362 99% 4%

Midlands 383 332 87% 377 304 81% -6%

DNC 530 508 96% 515 484 94% -2%

Dublin North 324 324 100% 317 307 97% -3%

LH/MH 405 392 97% 405 398 98% 1%

CN/MN 155 133 86% 158 134 85% -1%

Kerry 159 159 100% 164 164 100% 0%

Cork 799 795 99% 797 793 99% 0%

CW/KK/ST 356 188 53% 356 241 68% 15%

WD/WX 433 395 91% 430 378 88% -3%

Donegal 212 212 100% 210 203 97% -3%

Page 35: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

35

SLWC 109 109 100% 111 111 100% 0%

Mayo 131 131 100% 128 128 100% 0%

GY/RN 418 417 100% 412 411 99.8% 0%

Midwest 597 474 79% 582 460 79% 0%

SWTSCSA 66 66 100% 65 65 100% 0%

TOTAL 6,132 5,617 92% 6,072 5,507 91% -1%

3.1.5 Children in Care with a Care Plan

90% (n=5,444/6,072) of children in care had an up-to-date care plan against a target of 90%;

down one percentage point from Q2 2018.

628 children did not have an up-to-date care plan; 82 more than Q2 2018

However, it should be noted that variances have been identified in how data on this

metric are being reported by areas. In some areas care plans that have fallen due for

review and not updated are included. Also, it should be noted that where a care plan is

not up–to-date, the care plan in place (albeit that it is awaiting review) is used to

support the care of the child.

Number of children in care (CIC) with an up-to-date care plan by care type

Care Type

CIC No with CP % with CP CIC No with CP % with CP

Q2 2018 Q2 2018 Q2 2018 Q3 2018 Q3 2018 Q3 2018

Foster Care General 4,057 3,696 91% 4,005 3,548 89%

Foster Care (Relatives) 1,615 1,453 90% 1,595 1,447 91%

Residential Care General 349 331 95% 361 343 95%

Residential Special Care 15 15 100% 13 13 100%

Other Placements 96 91 95% 98 93 95%

National 6,132 5,586 91% 6,072 5,444 90%

Figures for care types for Q4 2017 revised from previously reported

11 areas along with Tusla’s Social Work Team for Separated Children Seeking Asylum met the

target of 90% of children in care with an up-to-date care plan.

Eight areas reported an increased percentage from Q2 2018, the most notable being that for

DSW/K/WW up 16 percentage points from 59% to 75%. CW/KK/ST reported the greatest

decrease in percentage from Q2 2018, down 58 percentage points from 97% to 39%. This

area advised that they are in the process of validating their data following transition to NCCIS

and hence data need to be interpreted with caution.

CW/KK/ST reported the highest number of children with no up-to-date plan (n=217)

followed by DSW/K/WW (n=100). CW/KK/ST advise that their data is undergoing

validation/verification following transfer onto the National Child Care Information

System.

Page 36: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

36

Breakdown of the number of children in care with an up to date care plan

Area

No in Care

Q2 2018

No with a care plan

Q2 2018

% with a care plan

Q2 2018

No in Care

Q3 2018

No with a care plan

Q3 2018

% with a care plan

Q3 2018

+/-

Q3 v Q2 2018

DSE/WW 276 243 88% 275 261 95% 7%

DSW/K/WW 418 247 59% 405 305 75% 16%

DSC 361 311 86% 365 308 84% -2%

Midlands 383 337 88% 377 347 92% 4%

DNC 530 493 93% 515 482 94% 1%

Dublin North 324 280 86% 317 280 88% 2%

LH/MH 405 389 96% 405 390 96% 0%

CN/MN 155 147 95% 158 142 90% -5%

Kerry 159 152 96% 164 158 96% 0%

Cork 799 752 94% 797 749 94% 0%

CW/KK/ST 356 344 97% 356 139 39% -58%

WD/WX 433 424 98% 430 424 99% 1%

Donegal 212 174 82% 210 181 86% 4%

SLWC 109 81 74% 111 91 82% 8%

Mayo 131 131 100% 128 128 100% 0%

GY/RN 418 418 100% 412 412 100% 0%

Midwest 597 597 100% 582 582 100% 0%

SWTSCSA 66 66 100% 65 65 100% 0%

TOTAL 6,132 5,586 91% 6,072 5,444 90% -1%

3.1.6 Children in Care in Education

98% (n=3,775/3,856) of children in care aged 6 to 15 years (inclusive) were in full time

education at the end of Q3 2018. Note: this figure does not include children in care under

the care of Tusla’s Social Work Team for Separated Children Seeking Asylum.

All areas with the exception of Dublin South Central reporting 95% or higher with two areas

reporting 100%,

94% (n=963/1,030) of children in care aged 16 and 17 years were in full time education at the

end of Q3 2018. Note: this figure does not include children in care under the care of Tusla’s

Social Work Team for Separated Children Seeking Asylum.

All but three areas (Dublin South Central, Dublin North and Donegal) reporting 90% or

higher with two areas reporting 100%.

Page 37: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

37

Children in care, 6 -15 years, in full time education, Q2 2018 – Q3 2018

Area

No of CIC 6-15 years

Q2 2018

No of CIC 6-15 years in

FT education Q2 2018

% of CIC 6-15 years in

FT education

Q2 2018

No of CIC 6-15 years

Q3 2018

No of CIC 6-15 years in

FT education Q3 2018

% of CIC 6-15 years in

FT education

Q3 2018

+/- Q3 v Q2 2018

DSC 242 230 95.0% 241 225 93.4% -1.6%

DSE/WW 175 168 96.0% 170 166 97.6% 1.6%

DSW/K/WW 264 257 97.3% 254 246 96.9% -0.4%

Midlands 226 220 97.3% 224 220 98.2% 0.9%

DNC 350 331 94.6% 343 326 95.0% 0.4%

Dublin North 192 190 99.0% 194 193 99.5% 0.5%

LH/MH 240 236 98.3% 247 240 97.2% -1.1%

CN/MN 99 98 99.0% 96 95 99.0% 0.0%

Cork 524 522 99.6% 525 516 98.3% -1.3%

Kerry 108 108 100.0% 117 113 96.6% -3.4%

CW/KK/ST 215 213 99.1% 213 210 98.6% -0.5%

WD/WX 304 302 99.3% 292 290 99.3% 0.0%

Mid West 423 413 97.6% 382 379 99.2% +1.6%

GY/RN 279 278 99.6% 263 262 99.6% 0.0%

Mayo 82 82 100.0% 78 78 100.0% 0.0%

Donegal 141 140 99.3% 144 143 99.3% 0.0%

SLWC 72 70 97.2% 73 73 100.0% 2.8%

National 3,936 3,858 98.0% 3,856 3,775 97.9% -0.1%

Children in care, 16 and 17 years, in full time education, Q2 2018 – Q3 2018

No of

CIC

16-17

yrs

Q2 2018

No of CIC

16-17 years

in FT

education

Q2 2018

% of CIC

16-17

years in FT

education

Q2 2018

No of CIC

16-17 yrs

Q3 2018

No of CIC

16-17 years

in FT

education

Q3 2018

% of CIC

16-17

years in FT

education

Q3 2018

+/-

Q3 v Q2

2018 Area

DSC 63 56 88.9% 68 60 88.2% -0.7%

DSE/WW 50 45 90.0% 58 54 93.1% 3.1%

DSW/K/WW 76 70 92.1% 82 77 93.9% 1.8%

Midlands 54 50 92.6% 48 45 93.8% 1.2%

DNC 100 93 93.0% 95 88 92.6% -0.4%

Dublin North 65 59 90.8% 57 50 87.7% -3.1%

LH/MH 71 64 90.1% 64 58 90.6% 0.5%

CN/MN 25 25 100.0% 27 27 100.0% 0.0%

Cork 142 141 99.3% 141 141 100.0% 0.7%

Kerry 23 23 100.0% 26 24 92.3% -7.7%

CW/KK/ST 69 67 97.1% 72 70 97.2% 0.1%

WD/WX 66 62 93.9% 67 61 91.0% -2.9%

Mid West 93 89 95.7% 93 85 91.4% -5.6%

Page 38: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

38

GY/RN 77 76 98.7% 66 65 98.5% -0.2%

Mayo 24 24 100.0% 28 27 96.4% -3.6%

Donegal 29 22 75.9% 24 18 75.0% -0.9%

SLWC 16 14 87.5% 14 13 92.9% 5.4%

National 1,043 980 94.0% 1,030 963 93.5% -0.5%

Note: Q2 2018 Data for Midwest amended from previously reported.

Page 39: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

39

3.2 AFTERCARE

The data presented below is based on a new set of metrics introduced to reflect the Child Care

Amendment Act 2015 and a revised Aftercare Policy.

3.2.1 Referrals for an aftercare service received in the quarter

132 referrals in Q3 2018; 11 more than Q2 2018 (121).

All but two of the referrals was eligible for an assessment of need

Of those eligible for an assessment of need, 93% (123) were < 18 years and in care. Three

young people were <18 years and not in care, while the remaining four were 18-20 years

(inclusive). Breakdown was not provided for the remaining five cases.

A total of 57 assessments were completed in Q3 2018

Area # Referrals

Q2 2018

# Referrals Q3 2018

# Eligible for an assessment of need

DSC 2 5 5

DSE/WW 6 8 8

DSW/K/WW 8 7 7

Midlands 2 7 7

DNC 11 8 7

Dublin North 6 5 5

LH/MH 7 14 14

CN/MN 3 5 5

Cork 36* 15 15

Kerry 3* 1 1

CW/KK/ST 5 14 14

WD/WX 1 0 -

Mid West 14 17 16

GY/RN 6 8 8

Mayo 4 9 9

Donegal 7 7 7

KEY FACTS

2,366 young persons/adults in receipt of an aftercare service at the end of Q3 2018; 27 more

than Q2 2018 (2,292)

64% (1,257/1,979) of those 18-22 years inclusive in receipt of an aftercare service were in

education/accredited training

77% (1,830) of young persons/adults in receipt of aftercare services had an aftercare plan;

down three percentage points on Q2 2018. Although improved from Q2 2018, rates

reported by DSW/K/WW (39%; 84/217) and Dublin South Central (41%; 57/139)

substantially lower than all other areas.

93% (1,635) of those assessed as needing an aftercare worker had an aftercare worker;

down three percentage points from Q2 2018. Rate reported by the three areas Dublin

South Central (72%), DSW/K/WW (63%) and LH/MH (68%) lower than all other areas.

Page 40: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

40

SLWC 0 2 2

Total 121 132 130

*Includes referrals for Q1and Q2 2018

3.2.2 Young Persons / Adults in receipt of an aftercare service

2,366 young persons/adults in receipt of aftercare services at the end of Q3 2018; 74 more

than Q2 2018. Figure includes young persons < 18 years and those 18-22 years inclusive.

Data not comparable with previous quarters.

Area # in Receipt of an

Aftercare Service Q2 2018

# in Receipt of an Aftercare Service Q3

2018

DSC 148* 139

DSE/WW 150 151

DSW/K/WW 245 217

Midlands 109 121

DNC 228 263

Dublin North 96 112

LH/MH 128 123

CN/MN 82 79

Cork 290 280

Kerry 39 51

CW/KK/ST 121 148

WD/WX 160 150

Mid West 196 195

GY/RN 157 165

Mayo 49 60

Donegal 55 68

SLWC 39 44

Total 2,292 2,366

*Revised from data previously reported

3.2.3 Young adults 18-20 years (inclusive) in receipt of an aftercare service

63% (1,497) of those in receipt of an aftercare service were 18 – 20 years inclusive and of

these 65% (980/1,497) were in education/accredited training; down one percentage point

from Q2 2018.

Majority of areas (10/17) reported more than seven out of 10 young people (18-20 years) in

education/accredited training. Highest percentages reported by Mayo (92%) and CN/MN

(90%). Rates reported by Dublin North City (35%; 60/170) and Dublin South Central (46%;

43/93) substantially lower than all other areas.

Area # 18-20 years

Q3 2018

# in education / accredited

training

% in education / accredited

training

DSC 93 43 46%

DSE/WW 70 58 83%

DSW/K/WW 130 82 63%

Page 41: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

41

Midlands 68 56 82%

DNC 170 60 35%

Dublin North 88 60 68%

LH/MH 101 60 59%

CN/MN 40 36 90%

Cork 192 145 76%

Kerry 29 22 76%

CW/KK/ST 107 71 66%

WD/WX 99 57 58%

Mid West 117 84 72%

GY/RN 98 71 72%

Mayo 26 24 92%

Donegal 37 28 76%

SLWC 32 23 72%

Total 1,497 980 65%

The highest number (267; 27%) of those in education/accredited training were in second level

education. The next highest number were in Third Level College / University (245; 25%)

followed closely by those in Post Leaving Cert Colleges (24%; 239).

# 18-20 years in

education/accredited Training Q3 2018

%

Second Level 267 27%

Vocational Training 88 9%

PLCs 239 24%

Third Level College / University 245 25%

Accredited Training (e.g., Solas) 107 11%

Other 34 3%

Total 980 100%

3.2.4 Young adults 21-22 years (inclusive) in receipt of aftercare services

20% (482) of those in receipt of an aftercare service were 21 – 22 years inclusive and of these

57% (277/482) were in education/accredited training; down from 64% (339/531) at the end

of Q2 2018.

Highest percentage reported by SLWC (100%; 2/2) followed by Cork (97%; 34/35). Rates

reported by Dublin North City (29%; 20/69) and CW/KK/ST (37%; 14/38) substantially

lower than all other areas.

Area # 21-22 years

Q3 2018

# in education /

accredited training

% in education /

accredited training

DSC 37 16 43%

DSE/WW 27 18 67%

DSW/K/WW 47 20 43%

Midlands 23 15 65%

DNC 69 20 29%

Page 42: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

42

Dublin North 21 12 57%

LH/MH 20 16 80%

CN/MN 23 15 65%

Cork 35 34 97%

Kerry 8 7 88%

CW/KK/ST 38 14 37%

WD/WX 44 23 52%

Mid West 29 22 76%

GY/RN 34 29 85%

Mayo 17 10 59%

Donegal 8 4 50%

SLWC 2 2 100%

Total 482 277 57%

More than half (53%; 148) of those in education/accredited training were in Third Level

College / with a further 22% (61) in Post Leaving Cert Colleges.

# 21-22 years in

education/accredited Training

%

Second Level 5 2%

Vocational Training 20 7%

PLCs 61 22%

Third Level College / University 148 53%

Accredited Training (e.g., Solas) 38 14%

Other 5 2%

Total 277 100%

3.2.5 Young adults 18-22 years (inclusive) in receipt of an aftercare service –

accommodation

Almost half (46%; 903) of young people 18 – 22 years in receipt of aftercare had remained

living with their carers. A further 10% (193) had returned home to parents/family. While

just over one in four was in independent leaving (26%; 507).

# 18-22 placement

type %

Residential Care Placement 99 5%

Remained with Carers 903 46%

Independent Living 507 26%

Designated Care Leavers Accommodation*

57* 3%*

At home 192 10%

Supported Lodgings 40 2%

Other 181 9%

Total 1,979 100%

*Data for “designated care leavers accommodation” undergoing validation.

Page 43: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

43

3.2.6 Young Persons / Adults in receipt of aftercare services with an Aftercare Plan

77% (1,830) of young persons/adults in receipt of aftercare services had an aftercare plan at

the end of Q3 2018; down three percentage points on Q2 2018. Five areas (WD/WX,

Midwest, LH/MH, Midlands and CN/MN) reported 90% or higher. Although improved from

Q2 2018, the rates reported by DSW/K/WW (39%; 84/217) and Dublin South Central (41%;

57/139) are substantially lower than all other areas.

45% (174/387) of those < 18 years in receipt of an aftercare service and 84% (1,656/1,979) of

those 18-22 years in receipt of an aftercare service had a plan.

Area

# in Receipt of an Aftercare

Service Q2 2018

# with an Aftercare Plan

Q2 2018

% with an Aftercare Plan

Q2 2018

# in Receipt of

an Aftercare

Service Q3 2018

# with an Aftercare

Plan Q3 2018

% with an Aftercare

Plan Q3 2018

DSC 148* 42 28% 139 57 41%

DSE/WW 150 141 94% 151 120 79%

DSW/K/WW 245 89 36% 217 84 39%

Midlands 109 109 100% 121 111 92%

DNC 228 181 79% 263 202 77%

Dublin North 96 88 92% 112 94 84%

LH/MH 128 119 93% 123 114 93%

CN/MN 82 82 100% 79 71 90%

Cork 290 253 87% 280 242 86%

Kerry 39 36 92% 51 42 82%

CW/KK/ST 121 113 93% 148 112 76%

WD/WX 160 144 90% 150 145 97%

Mid West 196 189 96% 195 188 96%

GY/RN 157 123 78% 165 122 74%

Mayo 49 43 88% 60 52 87%

Donegal 55 41 75% 68 39 57%

SLWC 39 33 85% 44 35 80%

Total 2,292 1,826 80% 2,366 1,830 77% *Revised from data previously reported

3.2.7 Young Persons / Adults in receipt of aftercare services with an Aftercare Worker

96% (1,754) of those with an aftercare plan were assessed as needing an aftercare worker.

93% (1,635/1,754) of those assessed as needing an aftercare worker had an aftercare worker

at the end of Q3 2018; down three percentage points from Q2 2018 (96%; 1,681/1,759).

Majority of areas (10/17) reported 100% with a further four areas reporting 90% or higher.

Rate reported by the remaining three areas Dublin South Central (72%), DSW/K/WW (63%)

and LH/MH (68%) lower than all other areas.

Page 44: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

44

Area

# in Receipt of an Aftercare

Service with a Plan

Q3 2018

# with Plan Assessed as

needing Aftercare

Worker Q3 2018

% with Plan Assessed as

needing Aftercare

Worker Q3 2018

# with an Allocated Aftercare

Worker Q3 2018

% with an Allocated Aftercare

Worker Q3 2018

DSC 57 57 100% 41 72%

DSE/WW 120 119 99% 111 93%

DSW/K/WW 84 81 96% 51 63%

Midlands 111 111 100% 111 100%

DNC 202 202 100% 198 98%

Dublin North 94 94 100% 90 96%

LH/MH 114 114 100% 77 68%

CN/MN 71 48 68% 48 100%

Cork 242 230 95% 210 91%

Kerry 42 42 100% 42 100%

CW/KK/ST 112 84 75% 84 100%

WD/WX 145 136 94% 136 100%

Mid West 188 188 100% 188 100%

GY/RN 122 122 100% 122 100%

Mayo 52 52 100% 52 100%

Donegal 39 39 100% 39 100%

SLWC 35 35 100% 35 100%

Total 1,830 1,754 96% 1,635 93%

3.2.8 Drop-In Service

All areas reported having a drop-in service.

3.2.9 Interagency Aftercare Steering Committee

All areas reported having an interagency aftercare steering committee.

Page 45: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

45

3.3 ADOPTION SERVICES

3.3.1 Information and Tracing Service

The Agency’s Adoption Information and Tracing Service oversees a broad spectrum of enquiries

from a wide range of people, including adopted people, birth parents, adoptive parents, siblings

of adopted people and other birth relatives and people raised in long-term foster care. The service

operates on a non-statutory basis within the wider legal framework of the Adoption Acts and

assists each of these categories of person with their information and tracing enquiries.

378 new enquiries regarding information and tracing received in Q3 2018; 15 (4%) more than

Q2 2018 and the highest number since Q2 2017. This brings to 969 the number of enquiries

for the first nine months of 2018; 298 (24%) fewer than same period last year (n=1,267).

474 482

311

228 228

363 378

0

100

200

300

400

500

600

Q1 2017 Q2 2017 Q3 2017 Q4 2017 Q1 2018 Q2 2018 Q3 2018

# New Enquiries

KEY FACTS

268 new applications to commence tracing for a searched person in Q3 2018; one more than

Q2 2018

845 applicants awaiting an information and tracing service at the end of Q3 2018; 97 (13%)

more than Q2 2018 and the highest number for the period Q1 2017 – Q3 2018.

Four of the five services meeting the target of eight weeks or less from time of application to

provision of non-identifying information

45 receipted completed applications for adoption (all types) received in Q3 2018, bringing the

total for the first nine months of 2018 to 162; 24 more than same period last year (138)

47 new children were referred for adoption in Q3 2018, bringing to the total for the first nine

months of 2018 to 148, six more than the same period last year (n=142).

24 completed adoption assessments presented to Local Adoption Committees in Q3 2018,

bringing the total for the first nine months of 2018 to 105; four fewer than the same period last

year.

Page 46: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

46

268 new applications to commence tracing of a searched person received in Q3 2018; one more

than Q2 2018. This brings to 688 the number of new applications for the first nine months of

2018; 67 (9%) fewer than the same period last year (n=755).

845 applicants awaiting an information and tracing service at the end of Q3 2018; 97 (13%)

more than Q2 2018 and the highest number for the period Q1 2017 – Q3 2018.

Highest number of applicants (357; 42%) awaiting a service are in DML/DNE. All services

reported an increase from Q2 2018; highest increase in reported by DML/DNE

Number of applicants awaiting an information and tracing service

Service Area No waiting

Q3 2017

No waiting

Q4 2017

No waiting

Q1 2018

No waiting

Q2 2018

No waiting

Q3 2018

Δ (+/-)

Q3 v Q2

Dublin Mid Leinster

Dublin North East

These two services are

combined for

applications waiting

247 237 225 300 357 +57

South West 350 335 284 297 301 +4

South East 70 46 42 39 60 +21

West 161 111 98 112 127 +15

National 828 729 649 748 845 -97

247

319

189167 153

267 268

0

50

100

150

200

250

300

350

Q1 2017 Q2 2017 Q3 2017 Q4 2017 Q1 2018 Q2 2018 Q3 2018

# New Applications

805754

828

729

649

748

845

0

100

200

300

400

500

600

700

800

900

Q1 2017 Q2 2017 Q3 2017 Q4 2017 Q1 2018 Q2 2018 Q3 2018

# Applicants Awaiting

Page 47: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

47

At the end of Q3 2018, all services with the exception of the West were meeting the target of

eight weeks or less for the length of time from application (production of ID) to the provision

of non-identifying. The West reported an increase of two weeks from Q2 2018.

Length of time (weeks) from application to the provision of non-identifying information

Area

Length of Time (weeks)

Q3 2017

Length of Time (weeks)

Q4 2017

Length of Time (weeks)

Q1 2018

Length of Time (weeks)

Q2 2018

Length of Time (weeks)

Q3 2018

Dublin Mid Leinster 7 7 0 7 7

Dublin North East 8 4 6 8 8

South West 8 8 8 8 6

South East 6 6 6 6 8

West 20 16 16 10 12

At the end of Q3 2018:

- the length of time from application (production of ID) to allocation of a social worker for

priority 1 applications ranged from 2 months to nine months against a target of 3 months

or less. Two of the five services (DML & West) are meeting the target of 3 months.

- the length of time from application (production of ID) to allocation of a social worker for

priority 2 applications ranged from 6 weeks to 18 months against a target of 6 months or

less. Two of the five services (DML & South West) are meeting this target.

- the length of time from application (production of ID) to allocation of a social worker for all

other applications ranged from 3 months to 30 months against a target of 12 months or less.

Three of the five services (DML, South East & West) are meeting this target.

Length of time (months) from application to allocation of a social worker, by priority type Q3 2018

Area

Priority 1

Applications Waiting time (mths)

Priority 2 Applications Waiting time (mths)

All other Applications

(mths)

Dublin Mid Leinster 2 2 3

Dublin North East 6 18 30

South West 9 6 weeks 30

South East 5 8 12

West 3 9 12

3.3.2 Adoption Assessments

45 receipted completed applications for adoption (all types) received during Q3 2018, 11

fewer than Q2 2018 and second consecutive decrease. This brings to 162 the number received

for the first nine months of 2018, 24 more than the same period last year (n=138).

Number of receipted completed adoption application packs received in the quarter

Area #

Q3 2017

#

Q4 2017

#

Q1 2018

#

Q2 2018

#

Q3 2018

Fostering to Adoption 9 9 9 8 3

Inter-Country Adoption 18 27 29 21 14

Domestic Adoption 5 4 17 6 10

Step-parent adoption 9 12 6 21 18

Total 41 52 61 56 45

47 new children were referred for adoption in Q3 2018; 25 (35%) fewer than Q2 2018. This

brings to 148 the number referred for the first nine months of 2018, six more than the same

Page 48: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

48

period last year (n=142). Referrals for step-parent adoption account for 77% (36/47) of new

children referred in Q3 2018.

Number of new children referred for adoption in the quarter

Area #

Q3 2017

#

Q4 2017

#

Q1 2018

#

Q2 2018

#

Q3 2018

Fostering to Adoption 34 20 16 13 6

Domestic Adoption 3 2 3 7 5

Step-parent adoption 12 13 10 52 36

Total 49 35 29 72 47

24 completed assessments (all types) were presented to Local Adoption Committees during

Q3 2018, 19 fewer than Q2 2018. This brings to 105 the number of assessments completed

(all types) in the first nine months of 2018, four fewer than the same period last year (n=109).

Completed assessments presented to Local Adoption Committees, by type

Area #

Q3 2017

#

Q4 2017

#

Q1 2018

#

Q2 2018

#

Q3 2018

Fostering to Adoption 2 6 3 8 10

Inter-Country Adoption 17 19 22 8 7

Domestic Adoption 3 7 3 12 1

Step-parent adoption 12 11 10 15 6

Total 34 43 38 43 24

Page 49: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

3.4 FOSTER CARERS

Data from one area (Cork) not available at the time of writing, hence comparison of data

with previous quarters is not meaningful

3.4.1 Number of foster carers

At least 3,827 foster carers (all types minus Brussels II Regulation) on the panel of approved

foster carers at the end of Q3 2018. There were at least 221 unapproved relative foster carers

of which 79% (175) had a child placed for >12 weeks. Eighty-two percent (n=1,006/1,227) of

relative foster carers are approved against a target of 80%.

Number of approved foster carers (all types minus Brussels II Regulation) Q3 2017 – Q3 2018

4,4434,384

4,302 4,296

3,827

3,000

3,300

3,600

3,900

4,200

4,500

4,800

Q3 2017 Q4 2017 Q1 2018 Q2 2018 Q3 2018

Nu

mb

er

of

app

rove

d f

ost

er

care

rs

KEY FACTS (Commentary based on data from 16 areas)

At least 3,827 foster carers on the panel of approved foster carers at the end of Q3 2018; 4,296

at the end of Q2 2018

82% (n=(1,006/1,227) of relative foster carers approved against a target of 80%

89% (n=2,095) of general foster carers had an allocated link worker (target 90%); 272 awaiting

a link work. 295 awaiting at the end of Q2.

88% (n=890) of approved relative foster carers had an allocated link worker (target of 85%);

116 awaiting a link worker. 196 awaiting at the end of Q2 2018

At least 221 unapproved relative foster carer; 274 at the end of Q2 2018

175 (79%) of the unapproved relative foster carers had a child placed with them for longer than

12 weeks; 215 (78%) at the end of Q2 2018

91% (n=159) of unapproved relative foster carers with a child placed > 12 weeks had an

allocated link (social) worker. 16 unapproved carers awaiting a link worker across four

areas. 46 unapproved carers awaiting a link worker at the end of Q2 2018.

Page 50: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

50

62% (n=2,367) of all approved foster carers are general foster carers. Relative foster carers

(approved) account for a further 26% (n=1,006) while private foster carers account for the

remaining 12% (n=454).

Breakdown of foster carers by type Q3 2017 – Q3 2018

Δ (+/-)

Foster Carers Q3 2017 Q4 2017 Q1 2018 Q2 2018 Q3 2018 Q3 v Q2 2018

General (Approved) 2,806 2,756 2,703 2,673 2,367 -

Relative (Approved) 1,171 1,152 1,124 1,132 1,006 -

Private (Approved) 466 476 475 491 454 -

Total Approved 4,443 4,384 4,302 4,296 3,827 -

Relative (Unapproved) 302 291 301 274 221 -

3.4.2 Foster carers approved and on the Panel of Approved Foster Carers

The number of foster carers approved (all types) and on the panel ranged from 433 in the

Midwest to 86 in Sligo/Leitrim/West Cavan at the end of Q3 2018.

Foster carers approved by type and area on the panel of approved foster carers, Q3 2018

Figure for private carers provided by DSE/WW includes private carers for Dublin South Central.

Ten areas reported an increase from Q2 2018 in the number of foster carers approved and on

the panel. The highest increase was reported by GY/RN (up 13) followed by MidWest (up

12).

Five areas reported a decrease from Q2 2018. The greatest decrease was reported by LH/MH

(down 9) followed by WD/WX (down 7). Donegal reported no change.

Eight areas had fewer foster carers at the end of Q3 2018 than the same period last year. The

greatest decrease was reported by CW/KK/ST (down 54) followed by MidWest (down 29)

DSCDSE/WW

DSW/K/WW

Midland

DNC

Dublin

North

LH/MH

CN/MN

CorkKerr

y

CW/KK/S

T

WD/WX

MidWes

t

GY/RN

Mayo

Donegal

SLWC

Private 0 28 144 43 22 40 46 15 2 34 31 24 7 0 11 7

Relative 67 60 107 58 145 73 49 18 32 82 75 111 63 27 21 18

General 147 140 141 147 144 124 192 99 71 182 209 298 232 68 112 61

Total 214 228 392 248 311 237 287 132 105 298 315 433 302 95 144 86

0

100

200

300

400

500

Nu

mb

er

of

app

rove

d f

ost

er

care

rs

Page 51: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

51

and Dublin North City (down 21). GY/RN reported the highest increase over the period 9up

14) followed by Dublin North (up 11).

Area breakdown of approved foster carers (all types), Q3 2017 – Q3 2018

Area Q3 2017 Q4 2017 Q1 2018 Q2 2018 Q3 2018 Δ (+/-) Q3 v Q2

2018

DSC 213 211 205 210 214 4

DSE/WW 231 231 231 226 228 2

DSW/K/WW 397 400 390 395 392 -3

Midland 252 245 246 243 248 5

DNC 332 333 326 306 311 5

Dublin North 226 229 230 233 237 4

LH/MH 286 289 296 296 287 -9

CN/MN 130 127 125 125 132 7

Cork 527 500 500 504

Kerry 105 108 102 102 105 3

CW/KK/ST 352 327 315 299 298 -1

WD/WX 344 337 327 322 315 -7

MidWest 434 433 412 421 433 12

GY/RN 288 282 272 289 302 13

Mayo 99 102 94 97 95 -2

Donegal 143 148 148 144 144 0

SLWC 84 82 83 84 86 2

National 4,443 4,384 4,302 4,296 3,827 -

*Figures revised since publication of the Q2 2016 Integrated performance and Activity Report

89% (n=2,095) of general foster carers approved and on the Panel had an allocated link

(social) worker against a target of 90% at the end of Q3 2018.

272 general foster carers were awaiting an allocated link worker; 295 awaiting at the end of

Q2.

Eight areas reported a percentage of 90% or higher with four of these areas reporting 100%.

Dublin South Central reported the highest number (n=46, down 3 from Q2 2018) of general

foster carers awaiting a link working followed by Dublin South East/Wicklow (n=36, up 5

from Q2 2018) and MidWest (n=34, down 12 from Q2 2018).

Six areas reported a decrease in general foster carers awaiting an allocated link worker from

Q2. The greatest decrease was reported by CW/KK/ST (down 26) and Midwest (down 12).

Four areas reported an increase from Q2 2018; the highest increase was reported by GY/RN

(up 15) followed by Midland (up 9), Dublin North City (up 6) and DSE/WW (up 5).

Page 52: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

52

General foster carers (approved) with/awaiting link social worker, Q2 2018 – Q3 2018

With

Link

Worker

Q2 2018

Awaiting

Link Worker

Q2 2018

% With Link

Worker

Q2 2018

With

Link

Worker

Q3 2018

Awaiting

Link Worker

Q3 2018

% With Link

Worker

Q3 2018

Δ +/- No.

Awaiting Link

Worker

Q3 v Q2

Area

DSC 98 49 67% 101 46 69% -3

DSE/WW 108 31 78% 104 36 74% 5

DSW/K/WW 117 31 79% 110 31 78% 0

Midland 140 7 95% 131 16 89% 9

DNC 143 0 100% 138 6 96% 6

Dub North 121 0 100% 124 0 100% 0

LH/MH 174 20 90% 172 20 90% 0

CN/MN 97 0 100% 99 0 100% 0

Cork 325 4 99%

Kerry 67 1 99% 70 1 99% 0

CW/KK/ST 131 52 72% 156 26 86% -26

WD/WX 178 36 83% 180 29 86% -7

MidWest 241 46 84% 264 34 89% -12

GY/RN 212 1 100% 52 16 76% 15

Mayo 53 16 77% 221 11 95% -5

Donegal 112 0 100% 112 0 100% 0

S/L/WC 61 1 98% 61 0 100% -1

National 2,378 295 89% 2,095 272 89%

General foster carers approved and on the panel with/awaiting a link (social worker), Q3 2018

88% (n=890) of relative foster carers approved and on the panel had an allocated link (social)

worker at the end of Q3 2018 against a target of 85%

116 were awaiting an allocated link worker at the end of Q3 2018; 196 awaiting at the end of

Q2 2018.

13 areas reported a percentage of 85% (target) or higher with eight of these areas reporting

100%.

DSCDSE/WW

DSW/K/

WW

Midland

DNC

Dublin

North

LH/MH

CN/MN

CorkKerr

y

CW/KK/S

T

WD/WX

MidWest

GY/RN

Mayo

Donegal

SO/LM/WC

No Link Worker 46 36 31 16 6 0 20 0 1 26 29 34 11 16 0 0

Link Worker 101 104 110 131 138 124 172 99 70 156 180 264 221 52 112 61

Total 147 140 141 147 144 124 192 99 71 182 209 298 232 68 112 61

% with Link Worker 69% 74% 78% 89% 96% 100% 90% 100% 99% 86% 86% 89% 95% 76% 100% 100%

0

50

100

150

200

250

300

350

Nu

mb

er

of

gen

era

l fo

ste

r ca

rers

Page 53: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

53

DSW/K/WW reported the highest number (n=40, down 4 from Q2) awaiting a link worker

followed by DSE/WW (n=19, up 5 from Q2); MidWest (n=15 down 11 from Q2), CW/KK/ST

(n=14, down 13 from Q2) and Dublin South Central (10, down 12 from Q2 2018).

Nine areas reported a decrease in the number awaiting from Q2 2018. Dublin North and

GY/RN reported the greatest decreases, both down 23.

Three areas reported an increase in the number awaiting from Q2 2018; highest increase

reported by WD/WX (up 7), DSE/WW (up 5) and LH/MH (up 2).

Relative foster carers (approved) with/awaiting link social worker, Q2 2018 – Q3 2018

Relative foster carers approved and on the panel with/awaiting allocated link Q3 2018

DSCDSE/WW

DSW/K/

WW

Midland

DNC DNLH/MH

CN/MN

CorkKerr

y

CW/KK/S

T

WD/WX

MidWest

GY/RN

Mayo

Donegal

SLWC

No Link Worker 10 19 40 0 0 0 7 0 0 14 8 15 0 3 0 0

Link Worker 57 41 67 58 145 73 42 18 32 68 67 96 63 24 21 18

Total 67 60 107 58 145 73 49 18 32 82 75 111 63 27 21 18

% with Link Worker 85% 68% 63% 100% 100% 100% 86% 100% 100% 83% 89% 86% 100% 89% 100% 100%

0

20

40

60

80

100

120

140

160

Nu

mb

er

of

rela

tive

fo

ste

r ca

rers

(ap

pro

ved

)

Area With Link

Worker Q2 2018

Awaiting Link

Worker Q2 2018

% With Link

Worker Q2 2018

With Link Worker

Q3 2018

Awaiting Link

Worker Q3 2018

% With Link

Worker Q3 2018

Δ +/- Number

Awaiting Link

Worker Q3 v Q2

DSC 41 22 65% 57 10 85% -12

DSE/WW 45 14 76% 41 19 68% 5

DSW/K/WW 59 44 57% 67 40 63% -4

Midland 55 2 96% 58 0 100% -2

DNC 142 0 100% 145 0 100% 0

Dublin North 50 23 68% 73 0 100% -23

LH/MH 43 5 90% 42 7 86% 2

CN/MN 13 0 100% 18 0 100% 0

Cork 134 3 98%

Kerry 32 0 100% 32 0 100% 0

CW/KK/ST 56 27 67% 68 14 83% -13

WD/WX 77 1 99% 67 8 89% 7

MidWest 84 26 76% 96 15 86% -11

GY/RN 46 23 67% 63 0 100% -23

Mayo 23 5 82% 24 3 89% -2

Donegal 21 0 100% 21 0 100% 0

S/L/WC 15 1 94% 18 0 100% -1

National 936 196 83% 890 116 88%

Page 54: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

54

3.4.3 Foster carers (relative) unapproved

221 relative foster carers unapproved at the end of Q3 2018

Of these 175 (79%) had a child placed with them for longer than 12 week

Of the 175 foster carers who had a child placed with them for >12 weeks, 91% (n=159) had an

allocated link (social).

16 unapproved carers were awaiting allocation of a link worker; 46 awaiting at the end of Q2

2018. These cases were reported by four areas (Midlands n=8, up 7 from Q2; DSW/K/WW

(n=6, no change from Q2), Dublin South Central (n=1, down 8 from Q2) and Midwest (n=1,

down 5 from Q2 2018).

Breakdown of foster carers not approved, Q3 2017 – Q3 2018

Unapproved Relative Foster Carers Q3 2017 Q4 2017 Q1 2018 Q2 2018 Q3 2018 Δ (+/-) Q3 v Q2 2018

No. unapproved 302 291 301 274 221 -

No (%) with a child > 12 weeks

258

251 245 215 175

-

85% 86% 81% 78% 79%

Child > 12 weeks and have a Link Worker 207 221 204 169 159

- 80% 88% 83% 79% 91%

Child > 12 weeks AWAITING Link Worker 51 30 41 46 16 -

Relative foster carers UNAPPROVED with a child > 12 weeks, with/awaiting a link worker, Q3 2018

DSCDSE/WW

DSW/K/

WW

Midland

DNC

Dublin

North

LH/MH

CN/MN

CorkKerr

y

CW/KK/S

T

WD/WX

MidWes

t

GY/RN

Mayo

Donegal

SO/LM/WC

No link worker 1 0 6 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

With link worker 14 20 21 4 16 8 14 3 10 3 11 27 5 2 0 1

FC Rel Unapp with Child> 12 wks 15 20 27 12 16 8 14 3 10 3 11 28 5 2 0 1

0

5

10

15

20

25

30

Nu

mb

er

rela

tive

(u

nap

pro

ved

) fo

ste

r ca

rers

Page 55: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

3.5 HIQA INSPECTIONS

The Health Information and Quality Authority (Hiqa) published three inspection reports in

Q3 2018. The summary of judgments is set out below and a summary of main findings can

be found in Appendix II.

FOSTERING

Area Inspected

Summary of Judgments

No of Standards

Assessed Compliant

Substantially

Compliant

Non

Compliant -

Major

Non

Compliant -

Moderate

Donegal 8 0 4 3 1

CHILDREN’S RESIDENTIAL SERVICES

Centre Inspected

Summary of Judgments

No of

Standards

Assessed Compliant

Substantially

Compliant

Non Compliant

- Major

Non Compliant

- Moderate

OSV – 4184 (South) 8 3 4 0 1

OSV – 4161 (DML) 10 3 3 1 3

Page 56: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

4.0 REGULATORY FUNCTIONS

KEY AREAS OF FOCUS

4.1 Early Years Inspectorate

4.2 Alternative Education Regulation

4.3 Non-Statutory Alternative Care Services

4.1 EARLY YEARS INSPECTORATE

4.1.1 Activity Data

4,457 early years services (EYS) on the register nationally at the end of Q3 2018; three fewer

than Q2 2018 and the fewest number for all quarters Q3 2017 – Q3 2018

4,500 4,484 4,472 4,460 4,457

4,200

4,300

4,400

4,500

4,600

4,700

No

of

EYS

# Early Years Services on the Register

KEY FACTS

4,457 EYS on the register nationally at the end of Q3 2018; fewest number for the period Q3

2017 – Q3 2018

524 EYS inspections (all types) carried out during Q3 2018; 172 (25%) fewer than Q2 2018 and

the fewest number for all quarters Q3 2017 – Q3 2018. Brings to 1,928 the number carried out

for 2018 YTD

44 incidents notified to the Inspectorate in Q3 2018; 26 fewer than Q2 2018 when the highest

number for the period Q2 2017 – Q2 2018 was reported. This brings to 171 the number notified

for the first nine months of 2018.

109 unsolicited information submissions received by the Inspectorate during Q3 2018. This

brings to 288 the number of submissions for the first nine months of 2018.

Page 57: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

57

524 inspections (all types10) carried out in Q3 2018; 172 (25%) fewer than Q2 2018 and the

fewest number for all quarters Q3 2017 – Q3 2018. This brings to 1,928 the number of

inspections for the first nine months of 2018.

22 new applications to become a registered provider received by the Inspectorate in Q3 2018.

This brings to 105 the number of applications received for the first nine months of 2018.

53 new applications approved by the Inspectorate in Q3 2018. This brings to 74 the number

of new applications approved for the first nine months of 2018.

No applications to become an EYS refused registration by the Inspectorate in Q3 2018; none

refused for the first nine months of 2018.

444 “change in circumstances” requests received by the Inspectorate in Q3 2018. This brings

to 998 the number received for the first nine months of 2018.

44 incidents notified to the Inspectorate in Q3 2018; 26 fewer than Q2 2018 when the highest

number for the period Q2 2017 – Q2 2018 was reported. This brings to 171 the number

notified for the first nine months of 2018.

10 Includes initial, follow up, complaints, focused inspections or fit for purpose inspections

550

632

708 696

524

0

100

200

300

400

500

600

700

800

Q3 2017 Q4 2017 Q1 2018 Q2 2018 Q3 2018

# Inspections

Page 58: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

58

109 unsolicited information submissions11 received by the Inspectorate during Q3 2018. This

brings to 288 the number of submissions for the first nine months of 2018.

No prosecutions of EYS taken by Tusla during the first nine months of 2018.

54 services were found to have closed in Q3 2018. This brings to 99 the number of services

found to have closed in the first six months of 2018

Two services de-registered by Tusla during Q3 2018.

11 Unsolicited information is defined as any piece of information that relates to the operation of an Early Years Service

that has been brought to the attention of the Inspectorate but has not been sought or requested or invited. Information

received in the form of a complaint shall be processed as unsolicited information.

28

63

57

70

44

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

Q3 2017 Q4 2017 Q1 2018 Q2 2018 Q3 2018

# Incidents Notified

Page 59: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

4.2 ALTERNATIVE EDUCATION REGULATION

Under Section 14 of the Education (Welfare)12 Act 2000

Home Education

1,434 children on the register for home education at the end of Q3 2018; nine fewer than Q2

2018 when the highest number for the period Q1 2017 – Q2 2018 was reported.

12 Section 14 Education (Welfare) Act 2000 14.—(1) The Board shall, on the commencement of this section, cause to be

established and maintained a register of all children in receipt of education in a place other than a recognised school

(hereafter in this section referred to as ‘‘the register’’). (2) Subject to subsection (3), where a parent chooses to educate,

or have educated, his or her child in a place other than a recognised school he or she shall, in accordance with this section,

apply to the Board to have the child concerned registered in the register.

(5) As soon as practicable after an application under this section is received by the Board, the Board shall, for the

purpose of determining whether the child is receiving a certain minimum education, cause an authorised person to carry

out, in consultation with the parent who made the application, an assessment of—…

1,352

1,3831,400

1,377

1,409

1,4431,434

1,280

1,320

1,360

1,400

1,440

1,480

Q1 2017 Q2 2017 Q3 2017 Q4 2017 Q1 2018 Q2 2018 Q3 2018

# Children on Register for Home Education

Key Facts

Home Education

1,434 children on the register for home education at the end of Q3 2018; nine fewer than Q2

2018 when the highest number for all quarters Q1 2017 – Q2 2018 was reported

191 applications received for home education in Q3 2018, bringing the total for 2018 YTD to

459

474 children awaiting assessment for registration at the end of Q3 2018; 120 (34%) more than

Q2 2018 and the highest number for the period Q1 2017 – Q3 2018.

525 registered children awaiting a review at the end of Q3 2018; 99 fewer than Q2 2018 and

the fewest number for all quarters Q1 2017 – Q3 2018.

Independent Schools

5,254 children attending 43 assessed schools at the end of Q3 2018; 18 fewer than Q2 2018

363 new children’s applications for education in independent schools received in Q3 2018

bringing the total for 2018 YTD to 778

940 children awaiting registration at the end of Q3 2018; 12 fewer than Q2 2018.

Page 60: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

60

17% (n=239) of children on the register have special educational needs; nine more than q2

2018 (230; 16%)

191 applications received for home education during Q3 2018 bringing the total for the first

nine months of 2018 to 459; first increase after three consecutive decreases and the highest

number for the period Q1 2017 – Q3 2018. More than one-quarter (16%; 49/191) of

applications were for children with special educational needs.

81 assessments (all types) for home education carried out in Q3 2018; seven fewer than Q2

2018 and the fewest number for all quarters Q1 2017 – Q3 2018.

41 children registered for home education13 in Q3 2018; 55 fewer than Q2 2018 and the fewest

number for all quarters Q1 2017 – Q3 2018. This brings to 228 the number of children

registered for the first nine months of 2018.

13 Number registered in a quarter does not reflect the number of assessments carried out in the previous quarter – reports

are written, reviewed and approved internally before registration

137

109

167156

141127

191

0

40

80

120

160

200

Q1 2017 Q2 2017 Q3 2017 Q4 2017 Q1 2018 Q2 2018 Q3 2018

# Applications for Home Education

158

140

114

152

118

8881

0

40

80

120

160

200

Q1 2017 Q2 2017 Q3 2017 Q4 2017 Q1 2018 Q2 2018 Q3 2018

# Assessments Done

Page 61: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

61

474 children awaiting assessment for registration at the end of Q3 2018; 120 (34%) more than

Q2 2018 and the highest number for the period Q1 2017 – Q3 2018. Of these (474), 97%

(n=458) are awaiting a preliminary 14 assessment while the remaining 16 are awaiting a

comprehensive assessment.

525 registered children awaiting a review at the end of Q3 2018; 99 fewer than Q2 2018 and

the fewest number for all quarters Q1 2017 – Q3 2018. Of these (525), 70 have been allocated

to an assessor for review, while the remaining 455 are unallocated.

14 This figure includes children currently going through the assessment process where the assessment is complete but the

report has not been signed off

76

99

71

49

9196

41

0

20

40

60

80

100

120

Q1 2017 Q2 2017 Q3 2017 Q4 2017 Q1 2018 Q2 2018 Q3 2018

# Children Registered

184160

236

330357 354

474

0

50

100

150

200

250

300

350

400

450

500

Q1 2017 Q2 2017 Q3 2017 Q4 2017 Q1 2018 Q2 2018 Q3 2018

# Children Awaiting Assessment

Page 62: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

62

No children were refused registration for home education in Q3 2018. There were no appeals

made in Q3 2018 against decisions not to register

50 children removed from the register in Q3 2018. Breakdown of the 50 is as follows: 21

(42%) turned 18 years; 26 (52%) returned to school and 3 (6%) left Ireland.

Independent Schools

5,254 children attending 43 assessed schools at the end of Q3 2018; a decrease of 18 on Q2

2018 (5,272)

363 new children’s applications for education in independent schools received in Q3 2018; a

total of 778 received for the first nine months of 2018

7 children registered15 during Q3 2018 bringing the total for the first nine months of 2018 to

1,242

No children refused registration in Q3 2018

940 children awaiting registration at the end of Q3 2018, 12 fewer than Q2 2018 – due to

issues relating to internal capacity or where information is awaited from the parents e.g.,

birth certs, signed application form

160 children removed from the register during Q3 2018 – children are automatically

removed from the register when they reach 18 years. No capacity to follow-up children who

move to a new school.

50 schools awaiting a review at the end of Q3 2018.

15 Number of children registered includes the processing of applications forms received in previous months. Once a

school has been assesed children are registered automatically once parents have supplied all required documentation

838787

745 762713

624

525

0

200

400

600

800

1000

Q1 2017 Q2 2017 Q3 2017 Q4 2017 Q1 2018 Q2 2018 Q3 2018

# Children Awaiting a Review

Page 63: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

63

4.3 NON STATUTORY ALTERNATIVE CARE SERVICES

Non Statutory Children’s Residential Centres

123 non-statutory residential centres at the end of Q3 2018; up five on Q2 2018

36 inspections (all types and onsite) conducted in Q3 2018; up nine on Q2 2018. This brings

to 88 the number of inspections carried out in the first nine months of 2018.

Inspections of Non Statutory Residential Services

Inspections by Type Q3 2017 Q4 2017 Q1 2018 Q2 2018 Q3 2018

Thematic Inspection

(announced) 9 11 15 16 23

Thematic Inspection

(unannounced) 5 11 9 6 9

Lead Inspector

Agency Visit 2 0 0 1 2

New Registration

Inspection Visit 3 4 1 4 2

Total 19 26 25 27 36

Key Facts

123 non-statutory residential centres at the end of Q3 2018; up five on Q2 2018

36 inspections (all types and onsite) conducted in Q3 2018, bringing the total for the first

nine months of 2018 to 88.

Page 64: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

64

5.0 EDUCATIONAL WELFARE SERVICES

Referrals16

Academic Year 2017 / 2018 (Sept - Aug)

6,670 referrals screened by senior educational welfare officers between September 2017 and

August 2018

2,977 referrals allocated to educational welfare officers (EWOs) between September 2017 and

August 2018

1,909 referrals screened out / required no further action between September 2017 and August

2018

16 A referral is a written notification of concern to EWS from a school, a parent, agency or concerned citizen in relation to the

educational welfare of a named child. Referrals are then screened against a set of criteria by the Senior Educational Welfare Officer

and a decision is made as to whether to proceed and open a case in relation this named child, or placed on a waiting list if there is an

EWS capacity issue.

KEY FACTS

Academic year Sept 2017 – Aug 2018

6,134 individual children worked with during the academic year

3,021 new individual children worked with during the academic year

1,664 screened referrals on a waiting list at the end of the academic year; 503 (43%) more

than at the start of the academic year

740 school attendance notices (SANs) issued in respect of 507 children under Section 25

of the Education (Welfare) Act 20001 during the academic year

175 summonses issued in respect of 128 children under Section 25 of the Act during the

academic year

243 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year

Academic year 2018/2019 (Sept)

3,468 individual children worked with during September 2018

313 new individual children worked with during September 2018

1,603 screened referrals on a waiting list at the end of the academic year; 61 fewer than

august 2018 and third consecutive monthly decrease

47 school attendance notices (SANs) issued in respect of 32 children under Section 25 of

the Education (Welfare) Act 20001 during September 2018

21 summonses issued in respect of 15 children under Section 25 of the Act during

September 2018

20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year

Page 65: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

65

1,664 screened referrals on a waiting list at the end of August 2018; 503 (43%) more than at

the start of the academic year

Referrals activity by month

Referrals Screened

Referrals Allocated

Referrals Screened Out

Screened Referrals on Waiting List (month end)

Outturn 2016/2017

5,939 3,377 1,108 1,161

Sep-17 218 177 16 960

Oct-17 372 305 64 900

Nov-17 491 315 166 819

Dec-17 372 174 50 998

Jan-18 638 310 223 1,083

Feb-18 784 346 208 1,205

Mar-18 726 276 130 1,513

Apr-18 743 253 130 1,670

May 2018 1,052 349 305 1,923

June 2018 617 232 204 2,046

Jul 2018 466 102 387 2,019

Aug 2018 191 138 26 1,664

Total (Sep-Aug) 6,670 2,977 1,909 -

Open Cases / Cases Worked

Academic Year 2017 / 2018 (Sept –August)

6,134 individual children worked with between September 2017 and August 2018

3,021 new individual children worked with between September 2017 and August 2018

3,925 new cases assigned to EWOs between September 2017 and August 2018

3,883 cases closed between September 2017 and August 2018

218372

491372

638784 726 743

1,052

617466

191

960 900 819998 1,083

1,205

1,5131,670

1,9232,046 2,019

1,664

0

500

1000

1500

2000

2500

Referrals Screened and on Waiting List by Month

Referrals Screened Screened Referrals on Waiting List (month end)

Page 66: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

66

Cases open, assigned and closed by month

Open Cases on hand/brought

forward

New Cases Assigned

Cases Closed

Outturn 2016/2017 3,113 4,422 3,902

Sept-17 3,113 297 300

Oct-17 3,110 318 348

Nov-17 3,080 330 313

Dec-17 3,097 219 195

Jan-18 3,121 414 360

Feb-18 3,175 464 384

Mar-18 3,255 431 247

Apr-18 3,439 322 353

May-18 3,408 461 486

Jun-18 3,383 275 495

Jul-18 3,163 188 194

Aug-18 3,157 206 208

Total (Sep-Jun) - 3,925 3,883

School Attendance Notices and Summonses under Section 25

Academic Year 2017 / 2018 (Sept – Aug)

740 school attendance notices (SANs) issued by EWS under Section 25 of the Education

(Welfare) Act 200017, September 2017 – August 2018. The notices issued were in respect of

507 individual children i.e., more than one notice was issued in respect of some children.

175 summonses issued by EWS under Section 25 of the Education (Welfare Act) 2000,

September 2017 – August 2018. The summonses issued were in respect of 128 individual

children i.e., more than one summons was issued in respect some children.

EWOs attended 464 court cases pertaining to their own cases between September 2017 –

August 2018 and an additional 36 court cases in a supporting capacity (e.g., at the request of

social work services).

230 child protection conferences (CPC) attended by EWOs between September 2017 and

August 2018.

243 Section 2418 meetings convened by EWOs between September 2017 and August 2018

17 Section 25 Education (Welfare) Act 2000—(1) Subject to section 17(2), the Board shall, if of opinion that a parent is failing or

neglecting to cause his or her child to attend a recognised school in accordance with this Act, serve a notice (hereafter in this section

referred to as a ‘‘school attendance notice’’) on such parent—(a) requiring him or her on the expiration of such period as is specified

in the notice, to cause his or her child named in the notice to attend such recognised school as is specified in the notice, and there to

attend on each school day that the notice is in force, and (b) informing him or her that if he or she fails to comply with a requirement

under paragraph (a) he or she shall be guilty of an offence.

18 Section 24 Education Welfare Act 2000: Where the board of management of a recognised school or a person acting on its behalf is

of the opinion that a student should be expelled from that school it shall, before so expelling the student, notify the educational

welfare officer to whom functions under this Act have been assigned, in writing, of its opinion and the reasons therefor. The

educational welfare officer concerned shall, as soon as may be after receiving a notification under subsection (1), make all reasonable

efforts to ensure that provision is made for the continued education of the student to whom the notification relates.

Page 67: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

67

189 official child protection and welfare referrals made by EWOs between September 2017

and August 2018.

Academic Year 2018 / 2019

Referrals

252 referrals screened by senior educational welfare officers in September 2018

433 referrals allocated to educational welfare officers (EWOs) in September 2018

150 referrals screened out / required no further action in September 2018

1,603 screened referrals on a waiting list at the end of September 2018; 61 fewer than at the

end of August 2018 and third consecutive monthly decrease

Referrals activity by month

Referrals Screened

Referrals Allocated

Referrals Screened Out

Screened Referrals on Waiting List (month end)

Outturn 2017/2018

6,670 2,977 1,909 1,664

Sep-18 252 433 150 1,603

Open Cases / Cases Worked

Academic Year 2018 / 2019

3,468 individual children worked with between during September 2018

(2) For the purposes of subsection (2), the educational welfare officer concerned shall, as soon as may be after receiving the

said notification—

(a) make all reasonable efforts to consult with the principal of the school concerned or a person nominated by him or her,

the student concerned and his or her parents, and such other persons as the educational welfare officer considers

appropriate, and

(b) convene a meeting attended by him or her of such of those persons as agree to attend such meeting.

218372

491372

638784 726 743

1,052

617466

191 252

960 900 819998 1,083

1,205

1,5131,670

1,9232,046 2,019

1,664 1,603

0

500

1000

1500

2000

2500

Referrals Screened and on Waiting List by Month

Referrals Screened Screened Referrals on Waiting List (month end)

Page 68: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

68

313 new individual children worked with between during September 2018

567 new cases assigned to EWOs between during September 2018

574 cases closed during Sept 2018Cases open, assigned and closed by month

Open Cases on hand/brought

forward

New Cases Assigned

Cases Closed

Outturn 2017/2018 - 3,925 3,883

Sept-18 3,155 567 574

School Attendance Notices and Summonses under Section 25

Academic Year 2018 / 2019

47 school attendance notices (SANs) issued by EWS under Section 25 of the Education

(Welfare) Act 2000, during September 2018. The notices issued were in respect of 32

individual children i.e., more than one notice was issued in respect of some children.

21 summonses issued by EWS under Section 25 of the Education (Welfare Act) 2000, during

September 2018. The summonses issued were in respect of 15 individual children i.e., more

than one summons was issued in respect some children.

EWOs attended 67 court cases pertaining to their own cases during September 2018 and an

additional three court cases in a supporting capacity (e.g., at the request of social work

services).

20 child protection conferences (CPC) attended by EWOs during September 2018

20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during September 2018

17 official child protection and welfare referrals made by EWOs during September 2018

Page 69: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

69

6.0 FAMILY SUPPORT SERVICES

KEY AREAS OF FOCUS

5.1 Family Support Services

5.2 Meitheal and Child & Family Support Networks

6.1 FAMILY SUPPORT SERVICES19

6.1.1 Family Support Providers

347 family support providers commissioned for 2018.

81% (n=281) of services provided data for Q1 – Q2 2018. Seven areas reported 100%. The

lowest percentage was reported by DSE/WW (26.7%; 4/15) followed by GY/RN (59.3%;

n=16/27).

The data presented in the following sections of the report need to be interpreted

in the context of missing data for areas concerned.

Family Support Services Commissioned by Area, 2018

Area

# Family

Support

Providers

Commissioned

2018

# External to

Tusla

# Internal to

Tusla

# of services

that provided

data for Jan –

Jun 2018

% that

provided data

for Jan- Jun

2018

DSC 24 24 2 21 87.5%

DSE/WW 15 11 4 4 26.7%

DSW/K/WW 25 23 2 17 68.0%

Midlands 10 9 1 10 100%

DNC 46 37 9 39 84.8%

Dublin North 19 18 1 16 84.2%

LH/MH 19 16 3 17 89.5%

CN/MN 7 3 4 7 100%

Cork 8 7 1 8 100%

Kerry 5 4 1 5 100%

CW/KK/ST 27 18 9 17 63.0%

WD/WX 30 26 4 22 73.3%

MidWest 34 34 0 34 100%

GY/RN 27 19 8 16 59.3%

Mayo 16 12 4 16 100%

Donegal 16 16 0 16 100%

SLWC 19 19 0 16 84.2%

Total 347 296 53 281 81.0%

19 Family Support Services includes those services funded through a Service Arrangement with the Child and Family

Agency and those internally funded and delivered through the Child and Family Agency.

KEY FACTS

At least 18,901 children in receipt of family support services at the end of June 2018

At least 17,189 children referred to family support services between January and June 2018

At least 73% (12,627) of children referred to family support services received a service

Page 70: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

70

6.1.2 Children in Receipt of Family Support Services

At least 18,901 children in receipt of family support services at the end of June 2018. Highest

number reported by Dublin North City (n=3,145) followed by Donegal (n=2,185) and Dublin

North (n=1,761). Fewest number reported by Kerry (n=235) followed by Cork (n=264) and

Mayo (n=419).

Children in receipt of Family Support Services

Area

Total number of children in receipt of a FSS at the end of

Dec 2017

Total number of children in receipt of a FSS at the end of

June 2018

DSC 1,155 920

DSE/WW 451 586

DSW/K/WW 1,358 1,541

Midlands 654 776

DNC 1,300 3,145

Dublin North 1,643 1,761

LH/MH 738 864

CN/MN 284 465

Cork 348 264

Kerry 216 235

CW/KK/ST 755 1,057

WD/WX 938 806

MidWest 5,297 1,345

GY/RN 1,330 1,131

Mayo 511 419

Donegal 2,525 2,185

SLWC 2,023 1,401

Total 21,526 18,901

6.1.3 Children Referred to Family Support Services

At least 17,189 children referred to family support services in the first six months of 2018.

The highest number was reported by Dublin North City (n=3,585) followed by Dublin North

(n=1,364), DSW/K/WW (n=1,358) and WD/WX (n=1,305). Fewest number reported by

Cork (n=298) followed by Kerry (n=307).

Page 71: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

71

Children referred to Family Support Services by area

Area Total number of children

referred to FSS, Jul – Dec2017 Total number of children

referred to FSS, Jan – Jun 2018

DSC 1,260 1,085

DSE/WW 403 493

DSW/K/WW 915 1,358

Midlands 613 399

DNC 2,215 3,585

Dublin North 1,501 1,364

LH/MH 871 860

CN/MN 273 973

Cork 355 298

Kerry 298 307

CW/KK/ST 622 869

WD/WX 921 1,305

MidWest 5,140 1,083

GY/RN 1,152 907

Mayo 592 609

Donegal 2,196 1,146

SLWC 1,344 548

Total 20,671 17,189

Children referred to Family Support Services by area Jan- Jun 2018

The most common source of referral was Tusla Social Work accounting for more than one in

four referrals (n=4,401; 26%) followed by Parent/ Guardian (n=3,903; 23%) and HSE

Officers (n=2,383; 14%). An Garda Síochána made 66 referrals, the highest number (n=19)

of which were reported by Cavan/Monaghan.

1,0

85

49

3

1,3

58

39

9

3,5

85

1,3

64

86

0

97

3

29

8

30

7 8

69

1,3

05

1,0

83

90

7

60

9 1

,14

6

54

8

-

1,000

2,000

3,000

4,000

DSC

DSE

/WW

DSW

/K/W

W

Mid

lan

ds

DN

C

Du

blin

No

rth

LH/M

H

CN

/MN

Co

rk

Ke

rry

CW

/KK

/ST

WD

/WX

Mid

We

st

GY/

RN

May

o

Do

neg

al

SLW

CNu

mb

er

of

child

ren

re

ferr

ed

Page 72: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

72

Children referred to Family Support Services by source of referral, Jan – June 2018

440126%

390323%

238314%

15549%

14038%

12157%

969, 6%

8885%

2531%

1101%

660%

440% Social Work (4,401)

Parent/Guardian (3,903)

HSE Officers (2,383)

Schools (1,554)

Self Referral (1,403)

Other Tusla Officers(1,215)

Voluntary Agency (969)

Other (888)

GP (253)

Other Family member(110)

An Garda Síochána (66)

Anonymous (44)

Page 73: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

Breakdown of source of referrals by area, Jan – Jun 2018

Social Work

Other Tusla

Officers HSE

Officers

An Garda

Síochána Self -

Referral Parent/G

uardian

Other Family

member GP Voluntary Agency

Anonymous Schools Other Total

DSC 190 49 173 2 47 275 9 6 50 0 90 194 1,085

DSE/WW 120 14 51 4 1 189 0 13 35 0 55 11 493

DSW/K/WW 432 156 143 3 128 184 9 29 135 8 67 64 1,358

Midlands 143 14 74 4 58 43 0 0 25 0 33 5 399

DNC 853 363 589 5 131 1,031 14 45 205 0 168 181 3,585

Dublin North 295 54 210 0 100 410 12 29 70 23 124 37 1,364

LH/MH 431 21 102 2 13 184 3 4 14 2 45 39 860

CN/MN 481 102 73 19 35 84 8 14 34 8 70 45 973

Cork 140 19 11 7 78 0 0 3 18 0 12 10 298

Kerry 65 33 17 6 6 92 3 16 19 0 38 12 307

CW/KK/ST 125 78 68 1 114 318 13 13 57 2 43 37 869

WD/WX 209 64 23 2 223 510 2 15 11 0 225 21 1,305

MidWest 318 80 150 0 122 138 2 18 95 1 119 40 1,083

GY/RN 223 73 163 8 50 96 3 20 57 0 111 103 907

Mayo 34 43 70 0 79 161 7 2 55 0 103 55 609

Donegal 182 30 331 3 206 123 25 16 39 0 160 31 1,146

SLWC 160 22 135 0 12 65 0 10 50 0 91 3 548

Total 4,401 1,215 2,383 66 1,403 3,903 110 253 969 44 1,554 888 17,189

Page 74: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

73% (12,627) of children referred to family support services between Jan – Jun 2018 received

a service. The percentage who received a service ranged from 96% (n=833/869) in

CW/KK/ST to 50% in Cork (n=148/298). In ten of the 17 areas at least seven out of ten

children referred received a service.

Of the children referred to family support services who received a service 5% (n=570) were

subject of a Child in Care Plan; 7% (n=847) were subject of a Tusla Social Work Child

Protection Plan; 6% (n=794) were subject of a Tusla Social Work Family Support Plan; 4%

(n=565) were subject of a Meitheal Support Plan while one-third (n=4,156) were subject of a

Single Agency Family Support Plan.

Number of children referred to Family Support Services (Jan – Jun 2018) who received a service

Of the total number of children referred to FSS (Jul – Dec 2017) and received a service the number who were subject of a:

Area Number referred

Of number

referred, number

who received a

service

% who rec'd a service

Child in Care Plan

Tusla Social Work Child

Protection Plan

Tusla Social

Work led Family

Support Plan

Meitheal Support

Plan

Single Agency Family

Support Plan

DSC 1,085 574 53% 30 20 37 23 76

DSE/WW 493 336 68% 5 14 29 15 154

DSW/K/WW 1,358 924 68% 53 48 22 80 187

Midlands 399 308 77% 13 45 30 9 124

DNC 3,585 2,447 68% 111 158 119 57 720

Dublin North 1,364 1,130 83% 43 60 91 10 339

LH/MH 860 687 80% 43 107 82 18 401

CN/MN 973 796 82% 21 33 64 74 219

Cork 298 148 50% 48 66 27 4 109

Kerry 307 178 58% 14 23 5 4 7

CW/KK/ST 869 833 96% 24 46 40 93 212

WD/WX 1,305 973 75% 30 26 25 16 89

MidWest 1,083 810 75% 75 116 48 44 287

GY/RN 907 495 55% 16 22 46 46 261

Mayo 609 477 78% 2 13 14 23 224

Donegal 1,146 1,092 95% 24 41 45 46 673

SLWC 548 419 76% 18 9 70 3 74

Total 17,189 12,627 73% 570 (5%) 847 (7%) 794 (6%) 565 (4%) 4,156 (33%)

Page 75: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

75

6.2 MEITHEAL

A key component of Tusla’s Prevention, Partnership and Family Support (PPFS) programme

of work is the roll-out of Meitheal - a national practice model (common approach to

practice) for all agencies working with children, young people and their families. This model

is designed to ensure that the needs and strengths of children and their families are effectively

identified and understood and responded to in a timely way so that children and families get

the help and support needed to improve children’s outcomes and realise their rights. It is an

early intervention response tailored to the needs of an individual child or young person and

is used where more than one agency involvement is needed. There are three stages of the

Meitheal process; preparation, discussion and delivery.

6.2.1 Meitheal Activity Data

802 Meitheal processes requested in the first six months of 2018; 198 (33%) more than the

last six months of 2017. Highest number reported by GY/RN (n=170) and CW/KK/ST

(n=103). These two areas account for more than one-third (34%; 273) of Meitheals

requested. Fewest number reported by SLWC (n=10) followed by Dublin South Central

(n=12) and CN/MN (n=16). Eleven areas reported fewer than 50 requests.

Meitheal processes requested

Area

Total Meitheal processes

Requested Q3 – Q4 2017

Total Meitheal processes

Requested Q1 – Q2 2018

DSC 18 12

DSE/WW 26 31

DSW/K/WW 39 58

Midlands 21 22

DNC 31 62

KEY FACTS

802 Meitheal processes requested in the first six months of 2018; 198 (33%) more than the

last six months of 2017

79% (634) requested through Direct Access, 14% (116) requested through Social Work

Diversion and 6% (52) Social Work Step Down

83% (665) of Meitheal processes requested proceeded to Stage 2 (Discussion Stage)

472 Meitheal processes reached completion of Stage 2; 75% (356) of these proceeded to

Stage 3 (Delivery)

365 Meitheal processes were closed in the first six months of 2018; 39% (141) were closed

following submission of a Meitheal request form; 18% (65) closed following completion of

Stage 2; 17% (61) closed following commencement of Stage 3 and 27% (98) closed post-

delivery.

103 Child and Family Support Networks (CFSN) operating at the end of June 2018, with a

further 20 planned.

Page 76: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

76

Dublin North 87 64

LH/MH 12 37

CN/MN 13 16

Cork 18 31

Kerry 20 20

CW/KK/ST 142 103

WD/WX 78 64

MidWest 24 49

GY/RN 33 170

Mayo 22 22

Donegal 12 31

SLWC 8 10

National 604 802

The most common pathway for requests is Direct Access accounting for 79% (n=634) of

requests. Social Work Diversion accounted for a further 14% (n=116) of requests. More than

half of these requests (57%; 66/116) were reported by three areas (CW/KK/ST, WD/WX and

Dublin North City). Seven areas reported no requests from social work diversion. Social

Work Step-Down accounted for fewer than one in ten requests (6%; 52) with the majority of

areas reporting single figures.

Access Pathway for Meitheal Requests Q1 - Q2 2018

Area

Total

Meitheal

processes

Requested

Q1 – Q2

2018

Of the total number of Meitheal requests for Q1 – Q2 2018 the number (%)

where the access pathway was:

Direct

Access

% Direct

Access

Social Work

Diversion

% SW

Diversion

Social

Work Step

-Down

% Step-

Down

DSC 12 10 83% 0 0% 2 17%

DSE/WW 31 24 77% 7 23% 0 0%

DSW/K/WW 58 42 72% 9 16% 7 12%

Midlands 22 20 91% 0 0% 2 9%

DNC 62 44 71% 18 29% 0 0%

Dublin North 64 53 83% 10 16% 1 2%

LH/MH 37 37 100% 0 0% 0 0%

CN/MN 16 15 94% 0 0% 1 6%

Cork 31 17 55% 9 29% 5 16%

Kerry 20 17 85% 3 15% 0 0%

CW/KK/ST 103 69 67% 29 28% 5 5%

WD/WX 64 33 52% 19 30% 12 19%

MidWest 49 36 73% 0 0% 13 27%

GY/RN 170 168 99% 0 0% 2 1%

Mayo 22 11 50% 11 50% 0 0%

Donegal 31 28 90% 1 3% 2 6%

SLWC 10 10 100% 0 0% 0 0%

National 802 634 79% 116 14% 52 6%

Page 77: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

77

83% (n=665) of the Meitheal requests received in the first half of 2018 proceeded to Stage

Two (Discussion Stage).

The percentage of requests proceeding to Stage 2 ranged from 100% (n=20/20) in Kerry to

42% (n=27/64) in Dublin North. Ten areas reported a percentage higher than the national

average of 83%.

Number of Meitheal requests received proceeding to Stage Two (Discussion Stage)

Area

Total Meitheal

processes requested

Q1 – Q2 2018

Of the total number of requests received

the number that Proceeded to

Discussion Stage (Stage Two)

% that Proceeded to Discussion Stage

(Stage Two)

DSC 12 9 75%

DSE/WW 31 29 94%

DSW/K/WW 58 55 95%

Midlands 22 18 82%

DNC 62 57 92%

Dublin North 64 27 42%

LH/MH 37 35 95%

CN/MN 16 15 94%

Cork 31 27 87%

Kerry 20 20 100%

CW/KK/ST 103 76 74%

WD/WX 64 53 83%

MidWest 49 48 98%

GY/RN 170 145 85%

Mayo 22 20 91%

Donegal 31 25 81%

SLWC 10 6 60%

National 802 665 83%

472 Meitheal processes reached completion of Stage Two between in the first six months of

2018. Highest number reported by GY/RN (n=74) followed by CW/KK/ST (n=54),

DSW/K/WW (n=46), Dublin North City (n=46) and Midwest (n=43). The fewest number was

reported by SLWC (n=6) followed by LH/MH(n=7), Cork (n=9) and Midlands (n=11).

75% (n=356) of processes reaching completion of Stage Two, proceeded to delivery (Stage 3)

(Meitheal Support Meeting). Ten areas reported a percentage above the national average of

75%. The highest percentage was reported by DSE/WW (96%; 27/28) and the lowest

percentage was reported by WD/WX (21%; 7/33) followed by CW/KK/ST (54%; n=29/54)

and Dublin North (59%; n=13/22).

10% (n=49) were referred for a Single Agency Response – majority of these were reported by

WD/WX (n=20) and CW/KK/ST (n=13).

Eleven (2%) of processes where referred to social work (stepped – up).

Page 78: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

78

Meitheal processes reaching completion of Stage Two

Area

Number of Meitheal Processes Reaching Completion of Stage Two, Jan- Jun 2018

Of the total number of Meitheal processes reaching completion of Stage Two (Discussion Stage) the number and percentage that

Proceeded to

Delivery (Meitheal

Support (Meeting) %

Referred to

Social Work

(Stepped Up) %

Referred to a

Single Agency

Response % Closed %

Categorised as Other %

DSC 12 9 75% 1 8% 0 0% 2 17% 0 0%

DSE/WW 28 27 96% 0 0% 0 0% 1 4% 0 0%

DSW/K/WW 46 43 93% 1 2% 1 2% 1 2% 0 0%

Midlands 11 9 82% 0 0% 0 0% 1 9% 1 9%

DNC 46 36 78% 4 9% 0 0% 3 7% 3 7%

Dublin North 22 13 59% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 9 41%

LH/MH 7 5 71% 0 0% 1 14% 1 14% 0 0%

CN/MN 16 15 94% 0 0% 1 6% 0 0% 0 0%

Cork 9 8 89% 0 0% 1 11% 0 0% 0 0%

Kerry 19 17 89% 1 5% 0 0% 1 5% 0 0%

CW/KK/ST 54 29 54% 1 2% 13 24% 7 13% 4 7%

WD/WX 33 7 21% 2 6% 20 61% 2 6% 2 6%

MidWest 43 39 91% 0 0% 3 7% 0 0% 1 2%

GY/RN 74 54 73% 1 1% 9 12% 9 12% 1 1%

Mayo 19 18 95% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 1 5%

Donegal 27 23 85% 0 0% 0 0% 3 11% 1 4%

SLWC 6 4 67% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 2 33%

National 472 356 75% 11 2% 49 10% 31 7% 25 5%

365 Meitheals closed during the first six months of 2018. The highest number of closures

was reported by CW/KK/ST (n=123; 34%). The majority (n=12) of areas reported 20 or

fewer closures.

39% (n=141) of requests were closed following submission of a Meitheal request form (Stage

1) and of these 57% (n=80/141) were reported by CW/KK/ST. Almost two-thirds (65%; n=

80/123) of Meitheals closed in CW/KK/ST were closed following submission of the Meitheal

request form.

18% (n=65) were closed following completion of the Strengths and Needs Form (Stage 2).

More than half (54%; 35/65) of those closed following completion of the Strengths and Needs

Form were reported by CW/KK/ST (n=19) and WD/WX (n=16). All other areas reported five

or fewer.

17% (61/365) were closed following commencement of Meitheal Support Meetings (Stage 3).

Highest number of these (n=10/61; 16%) was reported by SLWC.

Just over one in four (27%; 98/365) were closed post-delivery. Highest number of these was

reported by Mayo (n=17) followed by CW/KK/ST (n=16).

Page 79: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

79

Number of Meitheals closed Jan – Jun 2018

Area

Total

number of

Meitheals

closed

Of the total number of Meitheals closed the number and % that were closed following:

Submission

of a Meitheal

Request

Form %

Completion

of the

Strengths

and Needs

Form

(Discussion

Stage) %

Commence

ment of

Meitheal

Support

meetings

(Delivery

Stage) % Post delivery %

DSC 6 0 0% 1 17% 0 0% 5 83%

DSE/WW 19 3 16% 0 0% 3 16% 13 68%

DSW/K/WW 8 0 0% 2 25% 2 25% 4 50%

Midlands 16 4 25% 4 25% 2 13% 6 38%

DNC 21 6 29% 4 19% 4 19% 7 33%

Dublin North 2 0 0% 0 0% 2 100% 0 0%

LH/MH 7 2 29% 3 43% 2 29% 0 0%

CN/MN 8 0 0% 2 25% 4 50% 2 25%

Cork 6 6 100% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0%

Kerry 16 0 0% 2 13% 6 38% 8 50%

CW/KK/ST 123 80 65% 19 15% 8 7% 16 13%

WD/WX 40 20 50% 16 40% 3 8% 1 3%

MidWest 20 6 30% 5 25% 3 15% 6 30%

GY/RN 17 9 53% 2 12% 4 24% 2 12%

Mayo 24 1 4% 1 4% 5 21% 17 71%

Donegal 10 2 20% 3 30% 3 30% 2 20%

SLWC 22 2 9% 1 5% 10 45% 9 41%

National 365 141 39% 65 18% 61 17% 98 27%

6.2.2 Child and Family Support Networks

103 Child and Family Support Networks20 (CFSN) operating at the end of Q2 2018; four more

than at the end of 2017. A further 20 CFSNs are planned.

Galway/Roscommon reported the highest number of networks operating (n=12). SLWC

(n=1), MidWest (n=2) and Donegal (n=3) reported the fewest.

Child and Family Support Networks operating and planned

Area

CFSNs Operating

Dec 2017

CFSNs Operating

June 2018

CFSNs Planned

June 2018

DSC 5 5 2

DSE/Wicklow 7 7 2

DSW/K/WW 5 6 3

Midlands 7 7 0

Dublin North City 6 6 0

Dublin North 4 4 0

20 Child and Family Support Networks: Collaborative networks of community, voluntary and statutory providers intended to improve

access to support services for children and their families

Page 80: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

80

Louth/Meath 5 5 0

Cavan/Monaghan 7 8 1

Cork 8 10 4

Kerry 8 8 0

CW/KK/ST 7 7 0

WD/WX 8 8 0

MidWest 2 2 4

GY/RN 12 12 0

Mayo 3 4 0

Donegal 2 3 2

SLWC 3 1 2

National 99 103 20

Page 81: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

7.0 HUMAN RESOURCES

KEY AREAS OF FOCUS

7.1 Workforce Position

7.2 Absence Rate

7.3 Social Work Staff

7.4 Residential Services

7.5 Workforce Learning and Development

7.1 Workforce Position

3,801 whole time equivalent (WTE) staff (excluding agency staff) employed by Tusla at the

end of Q3 2018; 32 more than Q2 2018 and 158 (4%) more than Q3 2017.

Total Staff Employed (WTE), by quarter

3,643

3,6953,719

3,7693,801

3,400

3,500

3,600

3,700

3,800

3,900

4,000

Sep-17 Dec-17 Mar-18 Jun-18 Sep-18

Nu

mb

er

of

WTE

KEY FACTS

3,801 (WTE) employed by the Agency at the end of Q3 2018; 32 more than Q2 2018 and 158 (4%)

more than Q3 2017

366 new staff came on to the Agency’s payroll in the first nine months of 2018

225 staff left (incl. retirements) the Agency in the first nine months of 2018

160 staff on maternity leave at the end of August 2018

4.97% absence rate (August 2018); 0.28 percentage points higher than Q2 2018 but 0.24

percentage points lower than August 2017.

117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning & Development during Q3

2018 at which 1,850 persons attended.

Page 82: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

82

Social workers are the largest category of staff employed by the Agency accounting for 38%

(n=1,449) of total staff (WTE) employed at the end of Q3 2018, followed by social care staff

accounting for a further 29% (n=1,113). Management (Grade VIII+) account for 5% (173.76)

of the workforce.

Breakdown of staff category (WTE), Q3 2018

Increase/decrease in WTEs by staff category from Q2 2018 to Q3 2018 is presented in the

table below. Admin Grade III- VII experienced the highest increase in staff (up 28.53) while

social care experienced the greatest decrease (down 10.47).

Breakdown of staff (WTE) by category and year and quarter

Staffing by Category Sept 2017 June 2018 Sept 2018 Δ+/- Q3 2018 v Q2 2018

Social Work 1,460.53 1,445.92 1,448.5 2.58

Social Care 1,108.48 1,123.1 1,112.63 -10.47

Admin Grade III-VII 568.32 622.22 650.75 28.53

Family Support 160.17 148.17 139.79 -8.38

Management VIII+ 123.94 165.06 173.76 8.70

Education and Welfare Officer 88.08 93.94 93.88 -0.06

Other Support Staff inc catering 59.41 55.63 54.14 -1.49

Nursing 45.58 46.4 45.97 -0.43

Psychology and Counselling 17.92 19.07 17.48 -1.59

Other Health Professionals 10.36 49.57 63.72 14.15

Total Staffing 3,643 3,769 3,801 31.62

366 new staff joined Tusla (came onto Tusla’s payroll) in the first nine months of 2018

153 staff left Tusla (i.e., resigned, career breaks, excluding retirements) in the first nine

months of 2018

1,44938%

1,11329%

650.7517%

173.765%

139.794%

93.883%

63.722% 54.14

1%

45.971%

17.480%

Social Work

Social Care

Admin Grade III-VII

Management VIII+

Family Support

Education and Welfare Officer

Other Health Professionals

Other Support Staff inc catering

Nursing

Psychology and Counselling

Page 83: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

83

72 staff retired in the first nine months of 2018

160 staff were on maternity leave at the end of August 2018.

7.2 Absence Rate

At the end of August 201821 the overall absence rate for the Agency was 4.97% against a target

of 3.5% (target for public sector); 0.28 percentage points higher than Q2 2018 but 0.24

percentage points lower than August 2017.

Overall staff absence rate by month

The highest absence rate was reported for social care staff (9.19%). The rate for Residential

Services was 9.76% (data not shown), 4.79 percentage points higher than the overall rate of

4.97%.

Absence rate by staff grade

Staff Grade

Absence Rate

August 2017

Absence Rate

August 2018

Social Work 4.88 4.57

Social Care 7.81 9.19

All other grades 3.39 2.65

7.3 Social Work Staff (WTE)

1,449 whole time equivalent (WTE) social work staff (all grades and excluding agency staff)

employed by Tusla at the end of Q3 2018; 2.58 more than Q2 2018 and 12.03 fewer than Q3

2017.

21 Absence rates are reported monthly in arrears

5.2

1%

5.0

0%

4.7

0%

4.8

3%

6.1

0%

6.5

3%

5.5

6%

5.1

8%

5.0

3%

4.8

4%

4.6

9%

4.7

8%

4.9

7%

3.5%

2.00%

3.00%

4.00%

5.00%

6.00%

7.00%

Ab

sen

ce r

ate

Absence Rate Target 3.5% (Public Sector Target)

Page 84: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

84

Number of social workers (WTE) by month

103 social workers joined Tusla (came onto Tusla’s payroll) in the first nine months of 2018

92 social workers left (i.e., resigned, career breaks excluding retirements) in the first nine

months of 2018

27 social workers retired in the first nine months of 2018

89 social workers were on maternity leave at the end of August 2018

At the end of August 201822 the absence rate for social workers was running at 4.57%, 0.4

percentage points lower than the overall rate (4.97%).

A breakdown of the number of social workers (all grades) employed at the end of each quarter

Q3 2017 – Q3 2018 by area is presented in the table below.

22 Absence data is reported a month in arrears

1,4611,466 1,463

1,446 1,449

1,350

1,400

1,450

1,500

1,550

Sep-17 Dec-17 Mar-18 Jun-18 Sep-18

Nu

mb

er

of

Soci

al W

ork

WTE

Page 85: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

85

Breakdown of social work staff (WTE) by area Q3 2017 – Q3 2018

Social Work

(WTE) Social Work

(WTE) Social Work

(WTE) Social Work

(WTE) Social Work

(WTE)

Area Q3 2017 Q4 2017 Q1 2018 Q2 2018 Q3 2018

DSC 75.02 75.06 73.3 70.14 66.46

DSE/WW 101.79 99.52 95.8 94.11 92.05

DSW/K/WW 98.12 99.59 101.54 92.6 84.91

Midlands 75.44 78.62 79.35 76.89 74.07

Regional Services DML 22.83 21.99 21.69 20.58 23.07

DML Total 373.2 374.78 371.68 354.32 340.56

CN/MN 30.4 34.45 32.93 35.81 34.75

DNC 88.81 92.66 94.7 89.56 89.34

LH/MH 73.54 74.88 78.14 76.1 77.4

Dublin North 67.22 71.13 70.63 71.43 72.66

Regional Services DNE 27.68 28.34 27.62 27.33 28.08

DNE Total 287.65 301.46 304.02 300.23 302.33

CW/KK/ST 66.87 63.24 59.86 60.34 66.27

Cork 156.17 152.36 153.13 162.44 155.17

Kerry 39.97 40.35 35.81 34.33 35.96

WD/WX 86.48 84.39 82.41 81.17 82.31

Regional Services South 3.98 3.98 5 5 5

South Total 353.47 344.32 336.21 343.28 344.71

Donegal 64.53 63.66 62.6 62.24 63.61

GY/RN 91.77 92.08 93.77 90.26 95.73

Mayo 36.71 37.01 37.89 36.62 35.78

Mid West 110.46 107.02 104.77 105.48 111.82

SLWC 38.43 38.01 35.71 36.96 35

Regional Services West 1 1 0 0.9

West Total 342.9 338.78 334.74 331.56 342.84

Residential DML 2 1.99 1.87 1.8 1

Residential DNE 2.89 2.89 2.89 1.89 1.89

Residential West

Residential South 4.24 3.72 3.6 3.47 3.6

Residential Services 9.13 8.6 8.36 7.16 6.49

Corporate 89.22 93.09 101.66 102.52 104.24

Early Years Service 4.96 4.95 6.19 6.85 7.43

Corporate 94.18 98.04 107.85 109.37 111.67

Total 1460.53 1,465.98 1,462.86 1,445.92 1,448.5

Page 86: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

86

7.4 Workforce Learning and Development

Workforce Learning and Development (WLD) ran a total of 117 classroom based courses

during Q3 2018 at which a total of 1,850 persons attended. A breakdown of the courses run

and attendees by type is presented in the table below.

During Q3 2018 the most frequently run course was Therapeutic Crisis Intervention (TCI) six

monthly refresher training, with 16 sessions run. This was followed by NCCIS user training

with 14 courses.

A total of 382 external staff attended training in Q3 2018, the highest number (140; 37%) of

whom received Partnership, Prevention and Family Support training (e.g. Meitheal

Standardised Training, Meitheal Train the Trainer courses, Meitheal Standardised Briefings,

Participation of Young People Standard Briefings, Parenting Strategy Briefings and Parent

Support Champion training). The training course attracting the highest number of external

attendees was TCI refresher training with 101 attendees.

There were 30 courses that were categorised as ‘Other’ courses. These courses which

constitute 26% of all the courses, refer to a range of locally delivered courses that are

developed in response to particular needs and requests in areas such as Neglect, Child

Development; addressing HIQA Recommendations etc.

Other Developments in Q3

WLD personnel assisted in the coordination and facilitation of the Signs of Safety National

Gathering in September which showcased the frontline learning that has been embedded on

the National Approach to Practice.

Signs of Safety training continued during Q3 in support of implementation of the national

approach to practice. The 2-day Signs of Safety introductory workshops had the highest

attendance with 142 staff attending 5 workshops. A total of 136 staff attended eight Practice

Leader call back days.

Page 87: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

87

NO. # TUSLA # TUSLA # TOTAL

NATIONAL WLD TRAINING DATA COURSES SOCIAL OTHER EXT STAFF NO.

July to September 2018 HELD WORKERS STAFF (incl HSE) ATTENDEES

Core Court Room Skills 1 9 0 0 9

Corporate Induction (National) 2 8 45 23 76

Domestic Sexual and Gender Based Violence 4 19 26 14 59

First Time Managers 1 2 7 0 9

Introduction to Court Skills 3 14 8 0 22

Legal Briefing Seminar 1 23 21 2 46

Making the Most of Supervision for Supervisees 1 3 3 0 6

NCCIS User Training 14 46 68 10 124

Reflective Recording & Report Writing 1 6 3 0 9

Response Ability Pathways 1 5 8 5 18

SAOR 1 0 8 0 8

Signs of Safety - Practice Leader Callback 8 106 30 0 136

Signs of Safety (2 Day Introductory) 5 120 22 0 142

Staff Supervision Skills for Supervisors 1 5 7 0 12

Therapeutic Crisis Intervention - Six Monthly Refresher 16 0 76 101 177

Child and Youth Participation Training 11 42 64 30 136

CYP Training - Callback Day 5 11 18 2 31

Meitheal Briefing 6 0 2 54 56

Meitheal Facilitators Chairs Meeting 1 0 2 6 8

Meitheal Standardised Refresher Course 1 1 4 4 9

Meitheal Standardised Training Course 3 3 10 44 57

Other Courses 30 394 219 87 700

TOTAL 117 817 651 382 1,850

Page 88: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

88

8.0 FINANCE

Financial Performance

The outturn for the year to date (September 2018) is an over-spend of €9.025 million.

The net expenditure for the year to date (September 2018) is €533.624 million against a

budget allocation of €524.599 million.

Pay costs are over-spent against budget by €2.184 million.

Pay Costs

Non-pay costs are over-spent against budget by €9.286 million.

Non Pay Costs

A key area of over-spend is private residential and foster care costs at €9.080 million (12%)

over-spend YTD. Placement of children in private residential and foster care services is

strictly controlled through a national placement process.

Child and Family Agency

September 2018 YTD % Variance

Act vs Budget Actual Budget Variance

€’000 €’000 €’000 €’000

Pay costs 205,909 203,725 2,184 1%

Child and Family Agency

September 2018 YTD % Variance

Act vs Budget Actual Budget Variance

€’000 €’000 €’000 €’000

Non pay costs 346,312 337,026 9,286 3%

KEY FACTS

The financial outturn for September 2018 YTD is an over-spend of €9.025 million

Pay costs are over-spent against budget by €2.184 million

Non pay costs are over-spent against budget by €9.286 million

Key area of over-spend is private residential and foster care costs at €9.080 million over

budget

49% (€10.982 million) of legal expenditure year to date (€22.596 million) on guardians ad

litem (GALs), including GAL’s solicitors and counsel.

Page 89: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

89

Private Residential and Foster Care Costs

Legal costs incurred by the Agency account for a significant portion of the overall budget

of the Agency. The financial position shows a spend of €22.596 million for year to date

(September 2018) against a budget of €21.227 million.

A breakdown of legal expenditure by type is presented in the table below.

49% (€10.982 million) of the legal spend year to date has been on guardians ad litem

(GALs) including GALs solicitors and counsel.

In terms of forecasting these data should be interpreted with caution as they are based on

the individual billing pattern of persons concerned.

Legal Expenditure

Type

2018

€’000s

3rd Party Counsel Fees 448

3rd Party Solicitors Fees 1,126

Contracted Legal Services 8,055

Counsel fees - Tusla 1,545

Guardian ad Litem Costs 6,226

Guardian ad Litem Counsel fees 693

Guardian ad Litem Solicitors fees 4,063

General Legal Fees 114

Court Settlements 38

Other 289

Net Expenditure 22,596

Child and Family Agency

September 2018 YTD % Variance Act vs Budget

Actual Budget Variance

€’000 €’000 €’000 €’000

Private Residential & Foster Care

82,642 73,562 9,080 12%

Page 90: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

APPENDIX I

ABBREVIATIONS

The following abbreviations have been used for Tusla Service Areas in charts and tables presented

in this report.

Service Area Abbreviation

Dublin South Central DSC

Dublin South East / Wicklow DSE/WW

Dublin South West / Kildare / West Wicklow DSW/K/WW

Midlands Midlands

Dublin North City DNC

Dublin North DN

Louth / Meath LH/MH

Cavan / Monaghan CN/MN

Cork Cork

Kerry Kerry

Carlow Kilkenny / South Tipperary CW/KK/ST

Waterford / Wexford WD/WX

Mid West Mid West

Galway / Roscommon GY/RN

Mayo Mayo

Donegal Donegal

Sligo / Leitrim / West Cavan SO/LM/WC

Page 91: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

APPENDIX II – Hiqa Inspections Main Findings

This section provides a summary of the main findings from inspection reports published by Hiqa in Q3

2018. Areas/Services have drawn up action plans to address deficits identified and implementation of

these actions is underway.

FOSTERING REPORTS

Donegal - inspection took place in April 2018

This report reflects the findings of a thematic inspection, relating to the recruitment, assessment,

approval, supervision and review of foster carers.

8 standards assessed: 0 compliant, 4 substantially compliant, 1 non-compliant (moderate), 3 non-

compliant (major)

Concerns and allegations made in relation to foster carers were managed in line with Children First

(2011). However, inspectors reviewed one complaint which would have been more appropriately

categorised as a serious concern. As a result, it had not been correctly tracked or notified to the foster

care committee in line with protocol.

Safeguarding arrangements were not robust and did not always ensure that children were safe.

While all foster carers were allocated a link worker, other safeguarding arrangements were not always

effective in managing identified risks. There was a lack of oversight of the implementation of risk

management plans which had been developed in order to respond to risks identified within

placements.

Not all adults who had significant contact with children in placements and young people over 16 living

in the foster carer’s home had the necessary An Garda Síochána vetting.

Foster carers were trained in line with Children First (2011) and (2017). The majority of assessments

completed of both relative and general foster carers were comprehensive, good quality and had been

notified to the foster care committee. However, foster care assessments had not been completed in a

timely manner. The area had recently developed a dedicated team who had sole responsibility for

recruitment and assessment in order to ensure that assessments were completed in a timely way.

While there was guidance available in relation to steps to be taken in the event of emergency

placements, this guidance document had not been implemented. Mechanisms of oversight and

monitoring of preliminary checks were not adequate.

Foster carers received regular support visits. Formal supervision of foster carers had recently been

implemented in the area and the majority of foster carers had received one supervision visit since its

introduction. However, records of support visits completed were not adequate, case notes were brief

and did not always reflect what was discussed during the home visit. In addition, some records of

support visits were not up-to-date. There was a range of supports and services in place for foster carers

caring for children with complex needs.

There were also support groups and a range of specialised training available to foster carers. Foster

carers who had left the service had identified that they had received good supports from the service.

There was a training strategy and comprehensive training programmes in place for all foster carers.

Foster carers were positive about the level of training available. While there was an electronic tracking

system in place in order to track the training attended by foster carers an analysis of training attended

by individual carers had not been completed to date.

Page 92: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

92

82% of foster carers did not have a foster care review completed. As a result, the area had not assessed

foster carers continuing capacity to provide good quality care to children.

The foster care committee comprised of a range of experienced members who made clear decisions.

However, the arrangements for approving foster carers were not in line with policy, practice and best

practice, as some general foster carers had been recommended for approval by the foster care

committee pending An Garda Síochána vetting. Some relatives had been approved without the

necessary foundational training.

There was an insufficient number of carers to meet the demands of the service. However, there had

been a number of recruitment campaigns and a range of mechanisms in place to ensure foster carers

were supported, in order to retain them.

RESIDENTIAL SERVICES

OSV-0004184 South - inspection took place in May 2018

8 standards inspected: 3 compliant, 4 substantially compliant, 1 non-compliant (moderate)

The centre provided short, medium and long term care for up to three male children between 13 and 17

years on admission. The children were referred to the centre from either the Irish Refugee Protection

Programme or from the separated children seeking asylum social work team. At the time of the inspection,

there were 2 children living in the centre.The children spoke very positively of the centre. This was a

follow-up inspection and the second inspection of the centre by HIQA in nine months

During this follow up inspection, the inspector found that the majority of actions had been completed

at the centre.

One child told the inspector that their placement in the centre was good and he felt safe.

Children were safe in the centre and they received good quality care. Safeguarding and child protection

procedures and practices were robust.

The staff team were consistent and clear in relation to the integration of their model of care into

practice. The children at the centre had a good quality of life.

The centre prioritized the integration of children into the local community. Children attended school

and were involved in local sports clubs and churches.

There was a positive shift in the care, safety and security practices in the centre, which were now well

informed by the individual needs and risks of the children.

However, there was inconsistent practice in relation to the provision of aftercare for the children at

the centre.

There were improvements in the management and staffing of the centre.

Risk management systems had improved and new systems of auditing and oversight by the interim

service manager were in place and effective. However, certain templates utilized for the recording of

information at the centre were not entirely representative of this group of children. Not all staff had

completed mandatory training.

Page 93: [insert cover agreed with communications] · 20 Section 24 meetings convened by EWOs during the academic year . 8 ... 117 courses (excluding e-learning courses) run by Workforce Learning

93

OSV-0004187 South - inspection took place in June 2018

10 standards inspected: 3 compliant, 3 substantially compliant, 3 non-compliant (moderate), 1 non-

compliant (major)

The centre provided a residential service for up to four children aged between 13 and 17 years on

admission from the surrounding Child and Family Agency area. At the time of the inspection, there were

4 children living in the centre.

Overall, the staff team provided the children with good quality care. Children said they knew their

rights, had a good relationship with staff and liked living in the centre.

All of the children were in full-time education. They had access to a variety of activities including

interests and hobbies of their choice.

The emotional and health needs of the children were adequately provided for and the children had

their rights promoted by the staff team.

However, some children were uncertain about their long term plan and if they could continue to live

at the centre as the statement of purpose was not clear, which caused undue stress for the child.

Preparation for leaving care was not adequate for the children who required this support.

All of the children had been visited by a social worker, as required, but one child did not have an

allocated social worker.

The needs of the children were identified and recorded but there were some gaps in the children's

files relating to key pieces of documentation and plans.

Behaviours were well managed and children's complaints were resolved in a timely manner.

Safeguarding systems were in place.

The service was managed by an experienced management team and the staff team were well

supported and guided in their roles, despite the absence of up-to-date policies and procedures.

Some management systems required improvement to ensure effective action was taken to resolve

issues identified.

Inspectors escalated a concern in relation to fire safety which had been identified but had not been

satisfactorily addressed. Inspectors were provided with assurances that following some remedial

work, there were no outstanding risks relating to fire safety.

Managerial oversight, decision-making and action taken was not always adequately recorded. There

was sufficient staff to provide the level of care required for the children and communication and

morale was good on the team.

The provision of supervision was not adequate and not all of the training requirements of the team

had been met. The centre was recently renovated, but some maintenance issues remained.