greater charlotte biopharma manufacturing labor market analysis

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Biggins Lacy Shapiro & Co, (BLS & Co), a New Jerseybased site selection and economic development consultancy, was engaged by the North Carolina Biotechnology Center and its economic development partners in and around Charlotte, N.C. (Greater Charlotte), to gauge the capability of the region’s labor force to sustain significant biopharmaceutical manufacturing plant investments. It is our conclusion that the Central Piedmont regional labor market possesses the necessary skills, if not the direct experience, to support a number of biopharma manufacturing plants. Scale-up of the first plant, in particular, should be managed at pace that would enable the recruiting, training and development staff to understand and adjust to local market conditions and to assimilate new employees.

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  • 1. NORTH CAROLINA BIOPHARMA MANUFACTURING LABOR MARKET ANALYSIS Greater CharlotteCHARlOT TE REgiONAl PARTNERSHiP | DukE ENERgy NORTH CAROliNA BiOTECHNOlOgy CENTER | PARSONS

2. Alleghany Ashe SurryNorthamptonGatesCurrituck Stokes Rockingham Caswell Person WarrenCamdenVance Hertford Wilkes Pasquotank WataugaGranville Halifax PerquimansYadkinForsythOrangeFranklin Avery GuilfordChowanMitchellBertie Caldwell Alexander AlamanceDurham Nash EdgecombeDavieMadisonYancey Burke WakeMartin Washington Tyrrell DareIredell DavidsonWilsonCatawba Randolph ChathamBuncombe McDowell Rowan HaywoodPittBeaufortJohnston GreaterLincoln HydeSwainLeeGreene Rutherford Cabarrus Charlotte Graham HendersonStanly Harnett WayneLenoirJackson Polk GastonMooreClevelandMontgomeryMecklenburg CravenTransylvaniaCherokeeMaconPamlico Cherokee Clay Richmond CumberlandUnionHoke Sampson JonesYorkAnson Duplin OnslowScotland CarteretLancaster RobesonBladenGreater Charlotte LaborshedPender ColumbusNewHanoverTwelve North Carolina counties: BrunswickCabarrusCatawba ClevelandDavidsonDavie gastoniredell lincoln MecklenburgRowan Stanlyunion Plus three South Carolina counties:Cherokeelancaster york Thank you to the sponsors of the Greater Charlotte Biopharma Manufacturing Labor Market Analysis:Charlotte Regional PartnershipNorth Carolina Biotechnology Center www.charlotteusa.com www.ncbiotech.org kmcdonald@charlotteusa.com bill_bullock@ncbiotech.orgDuke Energy Parsons www.duke-energy.com/economic-development/ www.parsons.comeconomic-development.asp timothy.sheehan@parsons.com emily.felt@duke-energy.com daniel.mariani@parsons.com 3. TABLE OF CONTENTS1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.1 Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.2 Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.3 Methodology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.4 Project and Labor Requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 2.5 Geographic Scope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2.6 Data Gathering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2.7 Data Limitations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73. THE SUPPLY OF EXISTING BIOPHARMA MANUFACTURING LABOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 3.1 Life Sciences Industry Profile. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 3.2 Biopharma Manufacturing Occupations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 3.3 Existing Biomanufacturing Skill Base. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 3.4 Manufacturing/Production Labor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 3.5 Quality Assurance/Quality Control Labor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 3.6 Process Development Labor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 3.7 Plant Operations Labor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134. THE SUPPLY OF EMERGING BIOPHARMA MANUFACTURING TALENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 4.1 Emerging Biopharma Manufacturing Skill Base. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 4.2 BioWork Enrollment and Course Completions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 4.3 Biopharma Manufacturing Curricula . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 4.4 Community College Enrollment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 4.5 Undergraduate Degrees. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 4.6 Graduate and Ph.D Degrees. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185. CONCLUSIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19REFERENCES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 4. G R E A t E R C h A R L O t t E B I O P h A R M A M A N U F A C t U R I N G L A B O R M A R K E t A N A LY S I S 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARYcolleges and universities and economic developers. We also accessed federal and state occupational and aca- demic data bases, among other secondary information sources. Biggins Lacy Shapiro & Co, (BLS & Co), a New Jersey- based site selection and economic development consultancy,4. Inferring from these data the depth and breadth of was engaged by the North Carolina Biotechnology Cen- the regional labor market and its ability to sustain our ter and its economic development partners in and aroundproject. Charlotte, N.C. (Greater Charlotte), to gauge the capabilityOur findings address each of the plants most important of the regions labor force to sustain significant biophar- 2 maceutical manufacturing plant investments.1 It is ourfunctions: conclusion that the Central Piedmont regional labor market possesses the necessary skills, if not the direct experience,Manufacturing/Production to support a number of biopharma manufacturing plants. Scale-up of the first plant, in particular, should be man- As the pool of potential applicants far exceeds our annual aged at pace that would enable the recruiting, training andhiring requirement, BLS & Co believes that the Charlotte development staff to understand and adjust to local market labor force should be large enough to staff and maintain conditions and to assimilate new employees.the manufacturing/production functions at a large biolog-ics facility. However, the lack of any sizeable biopharma Our analysis adopts a site selectors perspective and was manufacturing activity in the Charlotte area at this time designed around the types of information that clients means attracting operators and technicians specifically typically want to understand before making an impor- skilled or experienced in biomanufacturing processes will tant location decision. Our methodology borrows from be challenging, particularly for that first plant. site selection engagements and labor market assessments performed on behalf of corporate clients and refined over We project approximately 5,800 potential applicants for years of practice. This approach includes: the 140 manufacturing/production positions requiringprevious experience. As these jobs would be filled at the 1. Creating a proxy project and associated labor rate of 70 per year, the potential labor supply, includingrequirements. The basis for this analysis was a fully those with skills that could be transferable to biologics orintegrated, GMP compliant, biologics manufacturing pharmaceutical manufacturing, would more than exceedplant producing an existing, approved, cell-based drug. the target 15:1 hiring ratio.The plant will ramp-up staffing over a 2-year period.Our hiring standard is based on 15 potential appli- To fill the slots available to 30 or so less experiencedcants for each available position (15:1 hiring ratio).employees only eight BioWork course completers are pro-duced annually in Greater Charlotte. However, the staff- 2. Defining the geographic boundaries of the labor mar- ing of these production positions is expected to benefitket (the laborshed). This constituted a 15-county from the new AAS in Biotechnology (and bioprocess arearegion in the Central Piedmont comprising an approxi- of concentration) program at Rowan-Cabarrus Commu-mately 45-minute commuting distance around principal nity College.employment nodes in Mecklenburg, Gaston, Rowanand Cabarrus Counties.Quality Assurance/Quality Control 3. Quantifying and assessing the availability of experi-enced manufacturing talent in the laborshed and newBLS & Co projects a potential applicant pool of approxi-workforce entrants who will replenish this pool. To do mately 1,500 persons in Greater Charlotte for the 90 expe-so we identified the most relevant occupations in keyrienced staffers to be hired into the QA/QC organizationfunctional areas of a biologics plant: 1] Manufacturing/ during the two year ramp up period. This represents almostProduction; 2] Quality Assurance/Quality Control; 3] 3x the number of applicants needed to achieve our desiredProcess Development; and 4] Plant Operations and Sup-hiring ratio. Local employers report generally favorableport. We also attempted to align these functions withresults recruiting experienced biologists, microbiologiststhe various degree programs at North and South Caro- and most chemists. As reported el

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