Gender Issues Awareness in CARRE FP7-ICT project

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FP7-ICT-2013-10ICT-WP-2013.5.1Personalized health, active ageing, and independent living

CARRE PC01: #29 Gender Issues Awareness

Eleni Kaldoudi

CARRE Project Consortium Meeting 01: Kick-off MeetingAlexandroupoli, 15 November 2013

Kick-off Meeting, 14-15 Nov 2013, #29: Gender Issues Awareness CARRE is a Specific Targeted Research Project addressing the ICT theme 5.1 on personalized health, active ageing and independent living.

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She figures 2009 (looks up to 2006)women in scientific research remain a minority 30% women of all researchers in EU (2006)proportion women researchers in EU-27 (2006)37% women in Higher Education 39% women in Government Sector19% women in Business Enterprise Sectorprogressive studies over the years show that there is a move towards a more gender-balanced research population

Kick-off Meeting, 14-15 Nov 2013, #29: Gender Issues Awareness One very interesting source of information is the so-called She Figures Report series. This is an EU statistical survey on gender equality in science in Europe. There has been a series of three such surveys, one every 3 years. The last one was published in 2009 and the next one is to be published next year. 8-1-20052

She figures 2012 (looks up to 2006)women in scientific research remain a minority 30% women of all researchers in EU (2006)proportion women researchers in EU-27 (2006)37% women in Higher Education 39% women in Government Sector19% women in Business Enterprise Sectorprogressive studies over the years show that there is a move towards a more gender-balanced research population

Kick-off Meeting, 14-15 Nov 2013, #29: Gender Issues Awareness One very interesting source of information is the so-called She Figures Report series. This is an EU statistical survey on gender equality in science in Europe. There has been a series of three such surveys, one every 3 years. The last one was published in 2009 and the next one is to be published next year. 8-1-20053

women/men in academia source: She Figures 2009, EU Commission, p. 73EU-27, 2002/2006

Kick-off Meeting, 14-15 Nov 2013, #29: Gender Issues Awareness At the first two levels of university education (students and graduates of largely theoretically-based programmes to provide sufficient qualifications for gaining entry to advanced research programmes and professions with high skills requirements), respectively 55% and 59% of enrolled students are female. However, men outnumber women as of the third level (students in programmes leading to the award of an advanced research qualification such as the PhD that are devoted to advanced study and original research) at which the proportion of female students enrolled drops back to 48%.

Indeed, women comprise only 45% of PhD graduates. The PhD degree is often required to embark on an academic career, which means that the attrition of women at this level will have a knock-on effect on their relative representation at the first stage of the academic career. 8-1-20054

women/men in science & engineering academia

source: She Figures 2009, EU Commission, p. 74EU-27, 2002/2006

Kick-off Meeting, 14-15 Nov 2013, #29: Gender Issues Awareness numbers are not always that clear ... numbers show that universities contain gendered hierarchies of powermost men with power and most women withouthowever, literature reports a growing view among academic policy makers & academics that gender discrimination is not an issue in higher education !Source: P. Cotterill, G. Letherby, Editorial, Women in higher education: Issues and challenges, Womens Studies International Forum , vol.28 , 109113, 2005

Kick-off Meeting, 14-15 Nov 2013, #29: Gender Issues Awareness

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senior women academics say qualitative study amongst UK university senior women academicsolder women were more sensitive to the subtle homosocial culture, attitudes and norms in the university younger women relied more on ameritocratic approach to their careers, seemingly less aware of the institutional gendered power relationsneither group showed signs of collective working or networking in the interests of themselves or women in general

Source: S. Ledwith, S. Manfredi, Balancing Gender in Higher Education A Study of the Experience of Senior Women in a `New' UK University, The European Journal of Women's Studies , vol. 7, 7-33, 2000

Kick-off Meeting, 14-15 Nov 2013, #29: Gender Issues Awareness

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design for women vs. women mentoringNebraska University 1999-2003, Project MuseEmpowering Women for Life-Long Success through Computer Expertiseinitially, with the aim to empower women undergraduates by teaching them technology in single-sex environments findings: empowerment came from peer-tutoring and informal workshops impact came from a computer-lab, where students would become experts and teach peers the lab became a place for socializing Source: L. Fuller, E.R. Meiners, Project Muse: Todays Research, Tomorrows Inspiration, Frontiers, A Journal of Women Studies, vol. 26(1), 168-180, 2005

Kick-off Meeting, 14-15 Nov 2013, #29: Gender Issues Awareness Our idea was an immaturetake the money and run strategy in which female students would get the skillsto enter the labor market and support themselves, and simultaneously theywould resist white supremacist capitalist patriarchy.

Our proposal focused on creating a course that would give women at our institutionthe tools to succeed at using technology.

The brochure we developed to advertise the course had photos ofwomen, used the languagespecifically designed for women and targetedfor womenand cited data about the states need for technology workers

Project Muse: Todays Research, Tomorrows InspirationL. Fuller, E.R. Meiners, Frontiers, A Journal of Women Studies, vol. 26(1), 168-180, 2005 8-1-20058

mens patriarchal support systemUK University qualitative research + literature evidencemen interviewed revealed, (but not necessarily openly acknowledged) that the help, support and encouragement of significant men were crucial elements of their own career progressin contrast, within this research group no woman experienced such opportunity(but some reverse cases were reported)Source: B. Bagilhole ,J. Goode, The Contradiction of the Myth of Individual Merit, and the Reality of a Patriarchal Support System in Academic Careers : A Feminist Investigation. European Journal of Women's Studies , vol. 8, 161, 2001

Kick-off Meeting, 14-15 Nov 2013, #29: Gender Issues Awareness For the men who more usually find themselves in influential company, this process of networking, mentoring and sponsorship need not necessarily be a conscious activity. 8-1-20059

mens patriarchal support systemfindings: the skills needed for a successful academic career can be exposed as part of a socialization process that some men and virtually no women are allowed to participate inwomen presume that someone is going to speak on their behalf, their good work will be recognized and rewarded (they believe in true merit, not self-advertisement)Source: B. Bagilhole ,J. Goode, The Contradiction of the Myth of Individual Merit, and the Reality of a Patriarchal Support System in Academic Careers: A Feminist Investigation. European Journal of Women's Studies , vol. 8, 161, 2001

Kick-off Meeting, 14-15 Nov 2013, #29: Gender Issues Awareness In reality, academic life is often experienced by women as a hostile male environment (Bagilhole, 1993; Bagilhole and Woodward, 1995)

According to Ferber (1988), women tend to cite other women more than men cite women, and therefore the fewer women in a field the greater the citations gap for them.

Atkinson and Delamont(1990) contended that the position for women and outsider male scientistsis therefore complex and less under their own control than is publiclyportrayed. There is no easy way for academics acting as individuals tomake their own work weighty for others in the field. Success is notachieved by publishing more, or even doing better research, but throughpersonal contacts, friendships and cooperative work with key players inthe field. Women particularly find it difficult to accrue these necessary resourcesto perform valued professional activities.

Therefore, if women continue to rely on good work and do notself-promote, their accomplishments in mens fields remain invisible(Lorber, 1994: 226). 8-1-200510

mens patriarchal support systemfindings: the academic profession does not supply adequate support and guidance for womenif and when women receive useful advice and mentoring, usually receive them from other women risk of the small minority of senior women becoming overburdened

Source: B. Bagilhole ,J. Goode, The Contradiction of the Myth of Individual Merit, and the Reality of a Patriarchal Support System in Academic Careers: A Feminist Investigation. European Journal of Women's Studies , vol. 8, 161, 2001

Kick-off Meeting, 14-15 Nov 2013, #29: Gender Issues Awareness In reality, academic life is often experienced by women as a hostile male environment (Bagilhole, 1993; Bagilhole and Woodward, 1995)

According to Ferber (1988), women tend to cite other women more than men cite women, and therefore the fewer women in a field the greater the citations gap for them.

Atkinson and Delamont(1990) contended that the position for women and outsider male scientistsis therefore complex and less under their own control than is publiclyportrayed. There is no easy way for academics acting as individuals tomake their own work weighty for others in the field. Success is notachieved by publishing more, or even doing better research, but throughpersonal contacts, friendships and cooperative work with key players inthe field. Women particularly find it difficult to accrue these necessary resourcesto perform valued professional activities.

Therefore, if women continue to rely on good work and do notself-promote, their accomplishments in mens fields remain invisible(Lorber, 1994: 226). 8-1-200511

women/men in science & engineering academia

source: She Figures 2009, EU Commission, p. 74EU-27, 2002/2006

~1:10 in Grade A~2:10 in Grade B

Kick-off Meeting, 14-15 Nov 2013, #29: Gender Issues Awareness so, can women in academia still hope for a transition from surviving to thriving ?

Kick-off Meeting, 14-15 Nov 2013, #29: Gender Issues Awareness quantitative study published in 2011quantitative study (n=1714) in USAcontrary to almost all published literature, andtaking into account factors such as tenure, discipline, family status and doctoral cohort,women actually have somewhat more collaborators on average than men doSource: B. Bozeman, M. Gaughan, How do men and women differ in research collaborations? An analysis of the collaborative motives and strategies of academic researchers, Research Policy, July 2011

Kick-off Meeting, 14-15 Nov 2013, #29: Gender Issues Awareness social media and networking explosion! online services for building and reflecting social networks FaceBook (750M users)MySpace, Tagged, Twitter, LinkedIn, Academia.edu (600K), ResearchGate (400K), ScienceStage, Scispace, BioMedExperts, Epernicus, somewhat more women that men use social networking average age in USA (~48) as compared to UK (~38)Sources:http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/global/led-by-facebook-twitter-global-time-spent-on-social-media-sites-up-82-year-over-year/A. Hoffman, The Social Media Gender Gap , Bloomberg Businessweek, May 19, 2008

Kick-off Meeting, 14-15 Nov 2013, #29: Gender Issues Awareness Initial proposals that the Web can support social networking where discussed back in 1993, and first such services popped-up a few years later (TheGlobe.com 1995).

Facebook introduced in 2004 became quickly the biggest on-line community, as of July 2011 boasting more than 750 million unique users.

. Hoffman, The Social Media Gender Gap , Bloomberg Businessweek, May 19, 2008 8-1-200515

women mentoring network ?towards effective and meaningful networking & mentoring to empower women in academiause on-line social networking services focus on women involve men why not keep up with the progress of the 1:10 ratio? only, the other way around focus on women mentoringuse semantic technologies to suggest/enrich/enhance meaningful mentoring relationships

Kick-off Meeting, 14-15 Nov 2013, #29: Gender Issues Awareness

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IFMBE - WiMBEIFMBE: International Federation of Medical & Biological Engineeringsince 1959as of 2010, 130.000 members and 61 affiliated institutions IFMBE WiMBE: Committee on Women in Medical & Biological Engineeringsince 2004 president: Monique Frize (Canada)website: ttp://ifmbe.org/organisation-structure/committees/women-in-mbe/

Kick-off Meeting, 14-15 Nov 2013, #29: Gender Issues Awareness IFMBE - WiMBEaction plans (amongst else): ensure greater inclusiveness of women in the various roles such as keynote and plenary speakers, Chairs of sessions, women receiving awards and as judges for the young presenters awardsdevelop a database of women in biomedical engineering and sciences and identify women for high profile rolesorganise workshops on gender issues at major IFMBE eventsdevelop an internet-based mentor project

Kick-off Meeting, 14-15 Nov 2013, #29: Gender Issues Awareness IFMBE - WiMBEso check WiMBE website for updates: ifmbe.org/organisation-structure/committees/women-in-mbe/

and look for WiMBE workshops and events in IFMBE conferences

Kick-off Meeting, 14-15 Nov 2013, #29: Gender Issues Awareness so, just add women and stir ? should ensure that womens interests, womens ways of thinking and acting are an integral part of the scientific & technological enterprise and of the academic environment Source: Byanyima, W.,The Role of Women Engineers in Developing Countries, Daphne Jackson Memorial Lecture, RSA Journal CXLII (5454):, 5766., 1994

Kick-off Meeting, 14-15 Nov 2013: WP overview

Kick-off Meeting, 14-15 Nov 2013, #29: Gender Issues Awareness The famous strategy of add women and stir can only have limited results because it does not deal with the essence of the problem.

women should ensure that womens interests, womens ways of thinking and acting are an integral part of the scientific and technological enterprise , and of the academic environment

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If you want anything said, ask a man. If you want anything done, ask a woman Margaret Thatcher

http://www.goodreads.com/quotes/tag/women?page=1

Kick-off Meeting, 14-15 Nov 2013: WP overview

Kick-off Meeting, 14-15 Nov 2013, #29: Gender Issues Awareness In politics, If you want anything said, ask a man. If you want anything done, ask a woman Margaret Thatcher

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CARREProject funded by the European Commission under the Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) 7th Framework ProgrammeNo. FP7-ICT-2013-611140http://www.carre-project.eu

Kick-off Meeting, 14-15 Nov 2013, #29: Gender Issues Awareness

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