FLAG FOOTBALL SIMMONS MIDDLE SCHOOL. HISTORY OF FLAG FOOTBALL  The first remembrance of organized “touch” football was in the 1930’s.  Flag Football.

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  • FLAG FOOTBALLSIMMONS MIDDLE SCHOOL

  • HISTORY OF FLAG FOOTBALLThe first remembrance of organized touch football was in the 1930s. Flag Football was developed on military bases in the early 1940s as a recreational sport for military personnel.Recreational leagues developed in the late 1940s and early 1950s. (Flag Football: Brief History of Flag Football, 2005)

  • HISTORY OF FLAG FOOTBALLSt. Louis, Missouri is the birthplace of the first national flag football organization, the National Touch Football League. It was formed in the 1960s. It produced the first rulebook for flag football and it also formed the first Hall of Fame for flag football.

    (Flag Football: Brief History of Flag Football, 2005)

  • HISTORY OF FLAG FOOTBALLFlag Football hit college campus intramurals in the 1960s. Flag Football soon became a big hit at most colleges.

    (Flag Football: Brief History of Flag Football, 2005)(Flag Football: Flag Football Images, 2006)..

  • HISTORY OF FLAG FOOTBALLThe annual National Collegiate Flag Football Championships are played each December at the University of New Orleans.

    (Flag Football: Brief History of Flag Football, 2005)(Flag Football: Flag Football Images, 2006)

  • HISTORY OF FLAG FOOTBALLThe United States Flag Touch Football League Tournament is the largest non-college tournament in the nation. It drew 175 teams in 2002 and crowned 11 National Champions.There is even a semipro league for flag football. Teams represent a franchised city and win cash awards at tournaments.

    (Flag Football: Brief History of Flag Football, 2005)

  • THE FORWARD PASSPurpose Quick way to advance the ball down the field.Grip Make a C with your hand and have fingers across laces.Stance Non-dominant shoulder toward target.

    (Fronske,1997, pp. 99-108)(Flag Football: Flag Football Images, 2006)

  • THE FORWARD PASSArm Action Bring ball behind ear. Stretch arm back and make an L with your arm. Step forward and bring arm forward.Release Make a whipping action with your wrist and the palm is out at point of release.Follow-Through Your arm should continue across your body toward non-dominant hip(Fronske,1997, pp. 99-108) (Flag Football: Flag Football Images, 2006)

  • CATCHING THE FOOTBALL ABOVE THE WAISTHand and Arm Position Make a triangle shape with your forefingers and thumb. THUMB TO THUMB.Tucking away REEF Rib cage Elbow Eagle Claw Forearm.

    (Fronske,1997, pp. 99-108)(Flag Football: Flag Football Images, 2006)

  • CATCHING THE FOOTBALL BELOW THE WAISTHand and Arm Position Thumbs face outward. PINKIE TO PINKIE.Tucking Away REEFRib Cage, Elbow, Eagle Claw, Forearm

    (Fronske,1997, pp. 99-108)(Flag Football: Flag Football Images, 2006)

  • CATCHING THE FOOTBALL OVER THE SHOULDERHand and Arm Position Back is to the ball, and you look over your shoulder in the direction that the ball is coming. Stick your arms above your head. PINKIE TO PINKIE.Tuck the Ball Away REEF(Fronske,1997, pp. 99-108)(Flag Football: Flag Football Images, 2006)

  • 3-STEP QUARTERBACK DROPPurpose Allows quarterback time to survey the field and defense. Also give quarterback momentum before throwing.Leg Action Quarterback will say Set Go, and will take a drop step with right foot. Second step will be left foot across right foot, and third step will be stepping with your right leg to the right. (Right-handers only)(Fronske,1997, pp. 99-108)(Flag Football: Flag Football Images, 2006)

  • CENTERING POSITIONPurpose To snap the football into play.Stance (3-point Stance) Feet are wider than hips. Toes are pointed straight ahead. Knees are bent at a 90-degree angle. Back is parallel to ground.Hand Position Make a C around the football. Flex your wrist and tilt the forward end of the football upward. Eyes and Snapping the Football Eyes should focus on quarterbacks belt. When snapping the football, propel the football backwards and upward.

    (Friend, 1975, pp. 11-13, 21-29)(Flag Football: Flag Football Images, 2006)

  • SHOTGUN SNAPPurpose To get the ball to the quarterback deep in the backfield so he/she can have more time to survey the field.Stance The quarterback will stand 3 to 5 yards behind the center with knees bent.Hand and Arm Position Arms are extended from the body. Palms are out with THUMB TO THUMB. The quarterback will keep his/her eyes on the football. When the quarterback is ready for the center to snap it, he/she will say SET GO.

    (Friend, 1975, pp. 11-13, 21-29)

  • HOOK PASS ROUTEPurpose This pass route is effective when a defender shows an inclination to retreat too soon.Distance to run for Hook Route: - When receiver gets 5-7 yards from the line of scrimmage, the receiver will prepare to cut back toward quarterback.When to throw the football to receiver: The quarterback will throw the football just before the receiver turns around. (Friend, 1975, pp. 11-13, 21-29)

  • HOOK PASS ROUTE

  • SLANT PASS ROUTEPurpose This is a quick pass play to hit the receiver on the slant at waist level.Distance to run for Hook Route: - The receiver will take a couple of quick steps toward the defender, then cut sharply at a 45-degree angle toward center of fieldWhen to throw the football to receiver: The quarterback will throw the football as soon as the receiver starts to cut. The quarterback should hit the receiver on the run at waist level.(Friend, 1975, pp. 11-13, 21-29)

  • SLANT PASS ROUTE

  • SQUARE-OUT PASS ROUTEPurpose This is another pass route that is effective when a defender is guarding you loosely.Distance to run for Hook Route: - The receiver will run about 10 yards down the field and then make a 90-degree cut toward the middle of the field.When to throw the football to receiver: The pass is delivered to lead the receiver slightly as the receiver completes the cut. (Friend, 1975, pp. 11-13, 21-29)

  • SQUARE-IN PASS ROUTE

  • DIRECT HANDOFFSPurpose - The purpose of the direct handoff is to give the running back the ball quickly so he/she can try to gain yardage on the run. Quarterback Pivot and Hand Delivery - The quarterback will make a one step pivot toward the right and toward the Running Back. Once the QB has the ball and starts to pivot, the RB will start to run to the right of the QB while at the same time making a rectangle to receive the ball. The QB will place the football in the rectangle.Tuck the Football - REEF

    (Friend, 1975, pp. 11-13, 21-29)

  • PITCH-OUTSPurpose - The pitch-out gets the football to the RB quicker, thus allowing the RB more time to find a hole in the defense to run through. QB LEG ACTION The QB will make a reverse pivot toward the right/left side. The QB will turn right by pivoting on the left foot. RUNNING BACK LEG ACTION Once the QB says SET GO, the RB will run to 4-5 yards to the right/left of the QB.

    (Friend, 1975, pp. 11-13, 21-29)

  • PITCH-OUTSRUNNING BACK HAND AND ARM POSITION Arms are extended with palms facing outward (thumb to thumb).QB TOSS - The QB will then prepare to toss the football with both hands aiming for the stomach of the RB.TUCK THE FOOTBALL REEF

    (Friend, 1975, pp. 11-13, 21-29)

  • BLOCKINGPurpose To keep the defense from the offensive person with the football.Use of Feet You CANNOT use your hands to block in flag football. You must mirror your opponents and just stand in-between the defender and your teammate with the football. You are not allowed to touch the defender.(Friend, 1975, pp. 11-13, 21-29)(Flag Football: Flag Football Images, 2006)

  • FLAG PULLINGPurpose In order to stop your defender from scoring, you must pull the defenders flag from his/her belt.Positioning You want to position yourself by the opponents waist where you can reach and pull the flag without touching your opponent.

    (Flag Football: Flag Football Images, 2006)(Mood, Musker, & Rink,1999, pp. 535 -538)

  • FLAG PULLINGReaching When you get close enough to your opponents waist, you will stretch out for the opponents flag.The Pull When you grab the flag, give it a quick, strong pull.

    (Flag Football: Flag Football Images, 2006)(Mood, Musker, & Rink,1999, pp. 535 -538)

  • FLAG PULLING RULESA defensive player shall not hold, grasp, or obstruct the forward progress of the runner when attempting to remove the flag belt. All shirts must be tucked in, and are not permitted to hang over the flag belt.

    (Flag Football: Flag Football Images, 2006)(Mood, Musker, & Rink,1999, pp. 535 -538) Runners shall not flag guard by using any part of the body or ball to deny the opportunity for an opponent to pull or remove the flag belt.

  • OFFENSIVE AND DEFENSIVE POSITIONSLine of ScrimmageCQBRBWRWRLMLMDBDBDRCOUNTS TO 5 MISSISSIPPIDBDBDBDB(Flag Football: Get in the Game, 2005)

  • PERSON-TO-PERSON DEFENSELeave some space between you and the receiver.Back pedal when the receiver starts his/her route.Run with the receiver to try to break up the pass.(Flag Football: Flag Football Images, 2006)(Flag Football: Get in the Game, 2005)

  • RUSHING THE QUARTERBACKOnly defensive players that have counted to 7 MISSISSIPPI can rush the Quarterback.The Quarterback has to pass the ball. He/she cannot run the football pass the line of scrimmage.(Flag Football: Flag Football Images, 2006)(Flag Football: Get in the Game, 2005)

  • PURPOSE AND OBJECT OF FLAG FOOTBALLThe object of flag football is to reach your opponents end zone in order to score. The object of the game is to score more points than your opponent.

    (Flag Football: Flag Football Images, 2006)(Flag Football: Get in the Game, 2005)

  • HOW TO START THE GAMEThe game starts by one team starting with the ball at its 5-yard line.The offense has four plays to score a touchdown. If the offense does not succeed at scoring a touchdown, the defense becomes the offense, and the offense starts its drive from its own 5-yard line.All possession changes, except interceptions, start on the offenses 5-yard line. (Flag Football: Get in the Game, 2005)

  • SCORINGTouchdowns = 6 pointsIf a female is involved with the touchdown = 9 pointsExtra Points = 2 points if successful from the 5 yard line.

    (Flag Football: Flag Football Images, 2006)(Flag Football: Get in the Game, 2005)

  • FOULS AND PENALITIESIf you physically tackle someone, that is a penalty and the offense would gain 10 yards. When trying to pull the flag belt off of your opponent, do not hold onto your opponent. If you grab your opponent, your team will lose 10 yards from the current spot. When running with the football, do not push or move other students out of the way. If you contact your opponent, your team will lose 10 yards from the previous spot.If your team commits pass interference, the offense will gain 10 yards from the previous spot and an automatic first down.(Flag Football: Flag Football Images, 2006)(Mood, Musker, & Rink,1999, pp. 535 -538)

  • TURNOVERSAny ball that is fumbled during a down will be dead by rule once it has touched the ground. There are no fumble recoveries in flag football. The defense can intercept a pass from the offense and attempt to score. If a team fails to score a touchdown or gain a first down after four downs, this is a turnover and the opposing team takes over the ball at their own 5-yard line.

    (Mood, Musker, & Rink,1999, pp. 535 -538)

  • WHEN A PLAYER IS DOWNThe player is downed in flag football when one or both of the flags are removed by an opposing player. The ball is downed when the offensive player touches out-of- bounds. (Flag Football: Flag Football Images, 2006)(Mood, Musker, & Rink,1999, pp. 535 -538)

  • SPORTSMANSHIPRemember to play with good sportsmanship today. There should be no arguing between you and other students. At the end of the game, be sure to shake your opponents hand and tell them Good Game!

  • REFERENCESFlag Football: Flag Football Images. (2006). [On-line]. September 14, 2006. Available : www.images.search.yahoo.com.

    Flag Football: Get in the Game. (2005). [On-line]. August 25, 2006. Available: www.flagfootball.ca

    Flag Football: Brief History of Flag Football. (2005). [On-line]. September 10, 2006. Available: www.flagfootball.org

    Friend, J. (1975). Youth league football. Chicago, IL: The Athletic Institute, pp. 11-13, 21-29, 77-83.

  • REFERENCESFronske, H. A. (1997). Teaching cues for sport skills. Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon, pp. 99-108.

    Mood, D., Musker, F. F., & Rink, J. E. (1999). Sports and recreational activities. Boston, MA: WCB / McGraw-Hill, pp. 535 -538.