enzymes the biocatalysts iug, spring 2014 dr. tarek zaida iug, spring 2014 dr. tarek zaida 1

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  • Enzymes The Biocatalysts IUG, Spring 2014 Dr. Tarek Zaida IUG, Spring 2014 Dr. Tarek Zaida 1
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  • Enzymes... Functional proteins catalyzing biochemical reactions. Involved in all essential body reactions Found in all body tissues Decrease the amount of free energy needed to activate a specific reaction Not altered or used up during reactions Accelerate speed of reactions Functional proteins catalyzing biochemical reactions. Involved in all essential body reactions Found in all body tissues Decrease the amount of free energy needed to activate a specific reaction Not altered or used up during reactions Accelerate speed of reactions 2
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  • General Characteristics of Enzymes Without catalysts, most cellular reactions would take place too slowly to support life. With the exception of some RNA molecules (rRNA), all enzymes are globular proteins. Enzymes are extremely efficient catalysts, and some can increase reaction rates by 10 20 times that of the uncatalyzed reactions. Without catalysts, most cellular reactions would take place too slowly to support life. With the exception of some RNA molecules (rRNA), all enzymes are globular proteins. Enzymes are extremely efficient catalysts, and some can increase reaction rates by 10 20 times that of the uncatalyzed reactions. 3
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  • Definitions and Related Terms Holoenzyme Apoenzyme Proenzyme Cofactors Active site Allosteric site Isozymes Holoenzyme Apoenzyme Proenzyme Cofactors Active site Allosteric site Isozymes 4
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  • Holoenzyme Functional unit consists of: Apoenzyme Cofactor Proenzyme/zymogen Inactive enzyme Holoenzyme Functional unit consists of: Apoenzyme Cofactor Proenzyme/zymogen Inactive enzyme Holoenzyme 5
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  • Cofactors Non-protein substances required for normal enzyme activity Two types Metals Co-enzymes: organic in nature Such as (FAD, NAD, Coenzyme A) Most vitamins Cofactors Non-protein substances required for normal enzyme activity Two types Metals Co-enzymes: organic in nature Such as (FAD, NAD, Coenzyme A) Most vitamins 6
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  • Active site Specific area of the enzyme structure where substrate binds and catalysis takes place. Active site Specific area of the enzyme structure where substrate binds and catalysis takes place. 8 Human carbonic anhydrase
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  • Allosteric site Non-active site May interact with other substances resulting in overall enzyme shape change Allosteric site Non-active site May interact with other substances resulting in overall enzyme shape change 9
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  • Isozymes o Are homologous enzymes that catalyze the same reaction in different places. o In particular they differ slightly in amino acid sequences o Example LDH ( in muscle & Liver) Isozymes o Are homologous enzymes that catalyze the same reaction in different places. o In particular they differ slightly in amino acid sequences o Example LDH ( in muscle & Liver) 10
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  • Enzymes are well suited to their roles in three major ways 1. Catalytic efficiency - Have enormous catalytic power 2.Specificity - Highly specific in the reactions they catalyze, 3. Regulation - Their activity as catalysts can be regulated. 1. Catalytic efficiency - Have enormous catalytic power 2.Specificity - Highly specific in the reactions they catalyze, 3. Regulation - Their activity as catalysts can be regulated. 11
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  • 1. Catalytic Efficiency Catalysts increase the rate of chemical reactions without being used up in the process. Although catalysts participate in the reaction, they are not permanently changed, and may be used over and over. Enzymes act like many other catalysts by lowering the activation energy of a reaction, allowing it to achieve equilibrium more rapidly. Catalysts increase the rate of chemical reactions without being used up in the process. Although catalysts participate in the reaction, they are not permanently changed, and may be used over and over. Enzymes act like many other catalysts by lowering the activation energy of a reaction, allowing it to achieve equilibrium more rapidly. 12
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  • 13 - Reactions occur spontaneously if energy is available - Enzymes lower the activation energy for the chemical reactions
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  • Enzyme-catalyzed reaction accomplish many important organic reactions, such as - ester hydrolysis - alcohol oxidation, - amide formation, etc. Enzymes cause these reactions to proceed under mild pH and temperature conditions, unlike the way they are done in a test tube. Enzyme-catalyzed reaction accomplish many important organic reactions, such as - ester hydrolysis - alcohol oxidation, - amide formation, etc. Enzymes cause these reactions to proceed under mild pH and temperature conditions, unlike the way they are done in a test tube. 14
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  • Enzymes can accomplish in seconds what might take hours or weeks under laboratory conditions. The removal of carbon dioxide out of the body is sped up by the enzyme carbonic anhydrase, which combines CO 2 with water to form carbonic acid much more quickly than would be possible without the enzyme (36 million molecules per minute). Enzymes can accomplish in seconds what might take hours or weeks under laboratory conditions. The removal of carbon dioxide out of the body is sped up by the enzyme carbonic anhydrase, which combines CO 2 with water to form carbonic acid much more quickly than would be possible without the enzyme (36 million molecules per minute). 15
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  • 2. Specificity Enzymes are often very specific in the type of reaction they catalyze, and even the particular substance that will be involved in the reaction. Strong acids catalyze the hydrolysis of any amide or ester, and the dehydration of any alcohol. The enzyme urease catalyzes the hydrolysis of a single amide, urea. Enzymes are often very specific in the type of reaction they catalyze, and even the particular substance that will be involved in the reaction. Strong acids catalyze the hydrolysis of any amide or ester, and the dehydration of any alcohol. The enzyme urease catalyzes the hydrolysis of a single amide, urea. 16
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  • Absolute specificity An enzyme catalyzes the reaction of one and only one substance. Absolute specificity An enzyme catalyzes the reaction of one and only one substance. 17
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  • Relative specificity An enzyme catalyzes the reaction of structurally related substances - lipases hydrolyze lipids, - proteases split up proteins, - phosphatases hydrolyze phosphate esters Relative specificity An enzyme catalyzes the reaction of structurally related substances - lipases hydrolyze lipids, - proteases split up proteins, - phosphatases hydrolyze phosphate esters 18
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  • Stereochemical specificity An enzyme catalyzes the reaction of only one of two possible enantiomers. D-amino acid oxidase catalyzes the reaction of D-amino acids, but not L- amino acids. Stereochemical specificity An enzyme catalyzes the reaction of only one of two possible enantiomers. D-amino acid oxidase catalyzes the reaction of D-amino acids, but not L- amino acids. 19
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  • 3. Regulation The catalytic behavior of enzymes can be regulated. Enzymes can be activated or inhibited, so that the rate of product formation responds to the needs of the cell. The catalytic behavior of enzymes can be regulated. Enzymes can be activated or inhibited, so that the rate of product formation responds to the needs of the cell. 20
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  • Enzyme Nomenclature and Classification 21
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  • Enzyme Nomenclature EC System Some of the earliest enzymes to be discovered were given names ending in in to indicate that they were proteins (e.g. the digestive enzymes pepsin, trypsin, chymotrypsin). 22
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  • International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Because of the large number of enzymes that are now known, a systematic nomenclature called the Enzyme Commission (EC) system is used to name them. 23
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  • Enzymes are grouped into six major classes on the basis of the reaction which they catalyze. Each enzyme has a long systematic name that specifies the substrate of the enzyme (the substance acted on), the functional group acted on, and the type of reaction catalyzed. All EC names end in ase. 24
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  • Examples Enzymes are also assigned common names derived by adding -ase to the name of the substrate or to a combination of substrate name and type of reaction: 27
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  • Self-test Predict the substrates for the following enzymes: a) maltase b) peptidase c) glucose 6-phosphate isomerase 29
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  • Match the following general enzyme names and the reactions that they catalyze: 30
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  • The Mechanism of Enzyme Action 31
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  • Enzyme Action Enzymes differ widely in structure and specificity, but a general theory that accounts for their catalytic behavior is widely accepted. The enzyme and its substrates interact only over a small region