EDUC1013 EDC131 Language and Literacy for Teachers ...ctl. s Graduate Attributes Learning Activities…

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Unit study package code: EDUC1013 Mode of study: Area External Credit Value: 25.0 Pre-requisite units: Nil Co-requisite units: Nil Anti-requisite units: Nil Result type: Grade/Mark Approved incidental fees: Information about approved incidental fees can be obtained from our website. Visit fees.curtin.edu.au/incidental_fees.cfm for details. Unit coordinator: Title: DrName: Paul GardnerPhone: 92663933Email: paul.gardner@curtin.edu.auLocation: Building: 501 4th Floor - Room: WSA76Consultation times: Contact me via emailTeaching Staff: Name: Noah MbanoEmail: Noah.Mbano@curtin.edu.auLocation: Building: 501Name: Polly FarmerEmail: Polly.Farmer@curtin.edu.auLocation: Building: 501 - Room: 214EName: Helen McCarthyPhone: 08 9266 2815Email: H.Mccarthy@curtin.edu.auLocation: Building: 501 - Room: LevelName: Silvana SputoreEmail: S.Sputore@curtin.edu.auLocation: Building: 501Name: Alison StaceyEmail: Alison.Stacey@curtin.edu.auLocation: Building: 501Name: Angela ToddEmail: Angela.Todd@curtin.edu.auLocation: Building: 501Administrative contact: Name: OUA General EnquiriesPhone: 08 9266 7590Email: hum.educationOUA@curtin.edu.auLocation: Building: Building 501, Bentley Campus - Room: Level 3Unit Outline EDUC1013 EDC131 Language and Literacy for Teachers OpenUnis SP 1, 2017 DVC EducationOUA Programs EDUC1013 EDC131 Language and Literacy for TeachersOUA 16 Feb 2017 OUA Programs, DVC Education Page: 1 of 15CRICOS Provider Code 00301JThe only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIShttp://fees.curtin.edu.au/incidental_fees.cfmAcknowledgement of Country We respectfully acknowledge the Indigenous Elders, custodians, their descendants and kin of this land past and present. The Centre for Aboriginal Studies aspires to contribute to positive social change for Indigenous Australians through higher education and research. Syllabus This unit provides an introduction to language, its development, use and centrality to living and learning. Effective teaching of language, literature and literacy rests upon theoretical understanding and practical appreciation of the roles of language and languages in all sociocultural contents. The modes, textual varieties, purposes and functions of English are emphasised as students develop confidence in their own academic and professional literacy. Introduction We might argue that without language, we would cease to be truly human. Without literacy we would not function in a world so dependent upon the written word and without literature we would never have the opportunity to step into other worlds; other times, or the shoes of others. Language, literacy and literature are uniquely human artefacts, but what are their similarities and how do they differ from one another? In this unit we will begin to explore the many facets of our linguistic, visual and symbolic world and consider the implications for both ourselves, as student teachers, and for the students we will eventually teach. We will embark on a journey in which we shall explore how language and literacy differ over time; between locations and even in the different daily contexts of use. Implicated in these differences are issues to do with cultural diversity, gender and social class and how they impact on learning in classrooms. To be an effective teacher we need to firstly nurture our own literacy. This unit will, therefore, provide you with tasks to help you develop your own literacy, both for professional and academic purposes. Tasks are designed to help you analyse your needs in this area and create a plan for improvement over the course of the unit and through-out your education degree. Unit Learning Outcomes All graduates of Curtin University achieve a set of nine graduate attributes during their course of study. These tell an employer that, through your studies, you have acquired discipline knowledge and a range of other skills and attributes which employers say would be useful in a professional setting. Each unit in your course addresses the graduate attributes through a clearly identified set of learning outcomes. They form a vital part in the process referred to as assurance of learning. The learning outcomes tell you what you are expected to know, understand or be able to do in order to be successful in this unit. Each assessment for this unit is carefully designed to test your achievement of one or more of the unit learning outcomes. On successfully completing all of the assessments you will have achieved all of these learning outcomes. Your course has been designed so that on graduating we can say you will have achieved all of Curtin's Graduate Attributes through the assurance of learning process in each unit. Learning Management System: Blackboard (lms.curtin.edu.au) On successful completion of this unit students can: Graduate Attributes addressed1 Develop personal literacy skills for academic and professional contexts and demonstrate personal academic integrity 2 Assess personal levels of competence and confidence about language and literacy and successfully implement a plan to meet required standards 3 Demonstrate an understanding of multiliteracies through applying them for different purposes in diverse contexts and at different times 4 Evaluate the roles of language and languages in diverse contexts as central to living and learning DVC Education OUA Programs EDUC1013 EDC131 Language and Literacy for TeachersOUA 16 Feb 2017 OUA Programs, DVC Education Page: 2 of 15CRICOS Provider Code 00301JThe only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIShttp://karda.curtin.edu.au/http://lms.curtin.edu.au/Curtin's Graduate Attributes Learning Activities The learning activities for the unit consist of the following: 1. Reading of set readings prior to interactive Collaborate sessions, 2. Reading the set text devoted to improving personal literacy (Communications Toolkit) on a weekly basis. 3. Identifying personal academic literacy skills and devising a plan for improvement. 4. Keeping a personal writers journal, including reflections on processes of composition. 5. Compiling a resource folder of quality childrens literature. 6. Reading and viewing activities/tasks aimed at consolidating knowledge and checking understanding of the topics on a weekly basis. 7. Online discussions with other students, as well as tutors, including forums such as the discussion board which is provided in Blackboard. Learning Resources Library Reading List The Reading List for this unit can be accessed through Blackboard. Essential texts The required textbook(s) for this unit are: l Grellier, J. & Goerke, V. (2014). Communications Toolkit. South Melbourne: Cengage. (ISBN/ISSN: ISBN/ISSN: 9.78017024361E+012) Recommended texts You do not have to purchase the following textbooks but you may like to refer to them. l Campbell, R. & Ryles, G. (2014).Teaching English Grammar. A handbook for Australian Teachers. This text is about teaching grammar and will help you improve your own grammar. If you are doing this unit to become a teacher this text will prove a good resource for this unit and for future units. (ISBN/ISSN: ISBN/ISSN: 9.78148601049E+012) Other resources These readings will be available digitally on Closed Reserve through the library and the links will be available on Blackboard. l Anstey, M. & Bull, G. (2009). Developing new literacies: Responding to picturebooks in multiliterate ways. In J. Evans (Ed.), Talking beyond the page: Reading and responding to picturebooks. (pp.26-43).London: Routledge Apply discipline knowledge Thinking skills (use analytical skills to solve problems) Information skills (confidence to investigate new ideas) Communication skills Technology skillsLearning how to learn (apply principles learnt to new situations) (confidence to tackle unfamiliar problems) International perspective (value the perspectives of others) Cultural understanding (value the perspectives of others) Professional Skills (work independently and as a team) (plan own work) Find out more about Curtin's Graduate attributes at the Office of Teaching & Learning website: ctl.curtin.edu.auDVC Education OUA Programs EDUC1013 EDC131 Language and Literacy for TeachersOUA 16 Feb 2017 OUA Programs, DVC Education Page: 3 of 15CRICOS Provider Code 00301JThe only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIShttp://ctl.curtin.edu.au/l Campbell, R. & Green, D. (2006). Literacies and Learners. Current Perspectives (3rd Ed). Frenches Forest, N.S.W.: Pearson. pp 1-23. l Comber, B. (2013). Literacy for a Sustainable World. In A. Simpson & S. White (pp 26-48). Language, Literacy & Literature. South Melbourne: Oxford. Cremin, T. & Myhill, D. (2012) Writing Voices: Creating a Community of Writers. Abingdon: Routledge. Pp 121 -134 Cremin, T. & Myhill, D. (2012) Writing Voices: Creating a Community of Writers. Abingdon: Routledge. Pp 138 -151 l Emmitt, M., Zbaracki, M., Komesaroff, L. & Pollock, J. (2010). Language & Learning. An Introduction for Teaching (5th Ed). South Melbourne: Oxford. pp 48-81. Ewing, R., Callow, J. & Rushton, K. (2016) Language and Literacy Development in Early Childhood. Port Melbourne: Cambridge University Press. pp 76 92 l Fellowes, J. & Oakley, G.(2014). Language, Literacy and Early Childhood Education. South Melbourne: Oxford. pp16-45 l Fellowes, J. &Oakley, G.(2014). Language, Literacy and Early Childhood Education. South Melbourne: Oxford. pp46-68. Gardner, P (2014) Becoming a teacher of writing: Primary student teachers reviewing their relationship with writing. English in Education, Vol 48, Issue 2, June 2014 pp128-148 Gardner, P. (2014) Who am I? Compositions of the self: an autoethnographic, rhizotextual analysis of two poetic texts. English in Education Vol 48, No. 3 pp 230 - 249 l Gee, P. & Hayes, E. (2011). Language and Learning in the Digital Age. New York: Routledge. pp 6-13. Larson, J. & Marsh, J. (2005) Making Literacy Real: theories and practices for learning and teaching. London: SAGE Publications pp 1-17 Loane, G. & Muir, S. (2017) Developing Young Writers in the Classroom. Abingdon: Routledge. pp247 - 278 http://link.library.curtin.edu.au/primo/course?EDUC1013 Other videos and resources will be available through the Blackboard site for this unit Assessment Assessment schedule Detailed information on assessment tasks 1. Task 1. This assessment is in two parts, as follows: (40%) Part i) is an essay and Part ii) is a self-evaluation of your own academic writing. For Part i), write an academic essay of 2000 words (not including references or headings) (35 % of the total unit mark). The title for the essay is: Topic: .to view language as though it were an object, devoid of the social context of its creation and use, is to dislocate it from the field of human interaction within which language derives the full quality of its meanings (Grugeon and Gardner 2000: 105) Task Value % Date DueUnit Learning Outcome(s) Assessed1Essay 40 percent Week: 6 Day: Monday 3rd April Time: 23:59 WST 1,4 2Exercise 40 percent Week: 12 Day: Monday 15th May Time: 23:59 WST 1,2,3 3Test 20 percent Week: 13 Day: Monday 22nd May Time: 23:59 WST 1,2,3,4 DVC Education OUA Programs EDUC1013 EDC131 Language and Literacy for TeachersOUA 16 Feb 2017 OUA Programs, DVC Education Page: 4 of 15CRICOS Provider Code 00301JThe only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIShttp://link.library.curtin.edu.au/primo/course?EDUC1013Explain your understanding of the above statement and discuss how a socio-cultural understanding of language has important implications for the teaching of language and literacy in the classroom. Part ii) is an Evaluation of Personal Academic Writing (5% of the total unit mark). (see Blackboard for further guidance) 2. Task 2 - Exercise 40% Create a Learning Portfolio and present it in the form of a PowerPoint Presentation. The portfolio will comprise of 5 tasks. The presentation of your learning in PowerPoint will represent thinking and learning completed by you throughout the semester. Each task must be presented on only one PPT slide. Your own personal academic literacy will be assessed as well as the content you present on each slide so be sure to make your work, accurate, cohesive and coherent. See the table below for details Topic PowerPoint Portfolio using the shell provided 1. Audio Presentation: The Self as a Writer (10%) Prepare a 4 minute recorded audio presentation in which you reflect on your journey as a writer during the unit. Place a photo of yourself on the slide and upload your audio file. The file should consist of: i. a reading, lasting no more than one minute, of an original piece of creative writing developed from your Writers Journal. ii. A 3 minute reflective account in which you: a. explain what you have learned about the writing process and how your chosen piece epitomizes your learning; b. reflect on how your identity as a writer has changed during the unit; Whilst the presentation should be planned and delivered in formal spoken English it should also be personalised and not be read, apart from the first minute. You are not expected to cover all content but you are expected to provide a clear and concise synthesis of your developing knowledge of yourself as a writer and the writing process. 2.Writing Poster (10%) Design an attractive poster for parents explaining your approach to writing with students. Use research evidence, background reading, and your own insights into the writing process to construct a clear rationale for your approach. 3. Childrens Literature (10%) Read: Tunnell, M.O. (2008) How to recognise a well written book. In Tunnell, M. O. & Jacobs, J.S. (2008). Children's literature briefly.(4th Ed) Upper Saddle River:Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall pp 18-28 Read relevant sections of: Gamble, N. & Yates, S. (2013) Exploring Childrens Literature: Reading with Pleasure and Purpose 3rd Ed. London: SAGE. Choose one picture book from the units childrens literature reading list and discuss the following: l Narrative structure l The author/illustrators use of multimodality l The use of language, including figurative language and the musicality of words l Characterization l Insights or theme. DVC Education OUA Programs EDUC1013 EDC131 Language and Literacy for TeachersOUA 16 Feb 2017 OUA Programs, DVC Education Page: 5 of 15CRICOS Provider Code 00301JThe only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIS3. Assessment 3 Online Test 20% Pass requirements In order to pass this unit, all assessment tasks must be submitted and an overall mark of 50% or more must be achieved. Assessments are not considered as submitted if any required sections are incomplete, or if the electronic file is unreadable. It is a students responsibility to ensure that assessments are complete and have been successfully uploaded in a readable format. A student who has received a Fail Grade (less than 50%) for an assessment, but achieves at least 40% of the possible mark for an assessment that was handed in on time, will be offered the opportunity to resubmit. The maximum a resubmission can be awarded is 50% of the possible mark and only one assessment resubmission per unit is possible. The resubmitted work must be received by the due date. Fair assessment through moderation Moderation describes a quality assurance process to ensure that assessments are appropriate to the learning outcomes, and that student work is evaluated consistently by assessors. Minimum standards for the moderation of assessment are described in the Assessment and Student Progression Manual, available from policies.curtin.edu.au/policies/teachingandlearning.cfm Late assessment policy This ensures that the requirements for submission of assignments and other work to be assessed are fair, transparent, equitable, and that penalties are consistently applied. 1. All assessments students are required to submit will have a due date and time specified on this Unit Outline. 2. Students will be penalised by a deduction of ten percent per calendar day for a late assessment submission (e.g. a mark equivalent to 10% of the total allocated for the assessment will be deducted from the marked value for every day that the assessment is late). This means that an assessment worth 20 marks will have two marks deducted per calendar day late. Hence if it was handed in three calendar days late and given a mark of 16/20, the student would receive 10/20. An assessment more than seven calendar days overdue will not be marked and will receive a mark of 0. 4. Poster (10%) Define multi-literacy and give four types of multi-literate practice ( you may use an image to identify each form of multiliterate practice). For each type, write a paragraph explaining the literacy skills required to undertake the practice. 5 . References Create a reference list for Assessment 3 following APA 6th guidelines. You only need to reference information included on your slides. You do not need to list readings that you have used to help you to do the quiz etc.Online Test (20%) You will complete an online test which covers all of the content in the unit including knowledge of language, academic literacy and language development. The test will be multiple choice and computer marked. The test will be live for four days over the weekend Friday 19th (9am WST), Saturday 20th, Sunday 21st and Monday 22nd (11:59 WST) May 2017. An announcement will be made prior to the release of the test. DVC Education OUA Programs EDUC1013 EDC131 Language and Literacy for TeachersOUA 16 Feb 2017 OUA Programs, DVC Education Page: 6 of 15CRICOS Provider Code 00301JThe only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIShttp://policies.curtin.edu.au/policies/teachingandlearning.cfmAssessment extension A student unable to complete an assessment task by/on the original published date/time (e.g. examinations, tests) or due date/time (e.g. assignments) must apply for an assessment extension using the Assessment Extension form (available from the Forms page at students.curtin.edu.au/administration/) as prescribed by the Academic Registrar. It is the responsibility of the student to demonstrate and provide evidence for exceptional circumstances beyond the student's control that prevent them from completing/submitting the assessment task. The student will be expected to lodge the form and supporting documentation with the unit coordinator before the assessment date/time or due date/time. An application may be accepted up to five working days after the date or due date of the assessment task where the student is able to provide an acceptable explanation as to why he or she was not able to submit the application prior to the assessment date. An application for an assessment extension will not be accepted after the date of the Board of Examiners' meeting. Deferred assessments Supplementary assessments Supplementary assessments, if granted by the Board of Examiners, will have a due date or be held between 26/06/2017 and 09/07/2017 . Notification to students will be made after the Board of Examiners meeting via the Official Communications Channel (OCC) in OASIS. It is the responsibility of students to be available to complete the requirements of a supplementary assessment. If your results show that you have been granted a supplementary assessment you should immediately check OASIS for details. Reasonable adjustments for students with disabilities/health circumstances likely to impact on studies A Curtin Access Plan (CAP) is a document that outlines the type and level of support required by a student with a disability or health condition to have equitable access to their studies at Curtin. This support can include alternative exam or test arrangements, study materials in accessible formats, access to Curtins facilities and services or other support as discussed with an advisor from Disability Services (disability.curtin.edu.au). Documentation is required from your treating Health Professional to confirm your health circumstances. If you think you may be eligible for a CAP, please contact Disability Services. If you already have a CAP please provide it to the Unit Coordinator at the beginning of each study period. Referencing style The referencing style for this unit is APA 6th Ed. More information can be found on this style from the Library web site: http://libguides.library.curtin.edu.au/referencing. Copyright Curtin University. The course material for this unit is provided to you for your own research and study only. It is subject to copyright. It is a copyright infringement to make this material available on third party websites. If your results show that you have been granted a deferred assessment you should immediately check OASIS for details.DVC Education OUA Programs EDUC1013 EDC131 Language and Literacy for TeachersOUA 16 Feb 2017 OUA Programs, DVC Education Page: 7 of 15CRICOS Provider Code 00301JThe only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIShttp://students.curtin.edu.au/administration/http://life.curtin.edu.au/health-and-wellbeing/CAP.htmhttp://life.curtin.edu.au/health-and-wellbeing/disability_services.htmhttp://life.curtin.edu.au/health-and-wellbeing/disablity_services_eligibility.htm#/health-and-wellbeing/10126.htmhttp://life.curtin.edu.au/health-and-wellbeing/contact_disability_services.htmhttp://libguides.library.curtin.edu.au/referencingAcademic Integrity (including plagiarism and cheating) Any conduct by a student that is dishonest or unfair in connection with any academic work is considered to be academic misconduct. Plagiarism and cheating are serious offences that will be investigated and may result in penalties such as reduced or zero grades, annulled units or even termination from the course. Assessments under investigation will not be given a mark until the matter is concluded. This may result in the unit grade being withheld or a grade of Fail Incomplete (F-IN) until a decision has been made by the Student Disciplinary Panel. This may impact on enrolment in further units/study periods. Plagiarism occurs when work or property of another person is presented as one's own, without appropriate acknowledgement or referencing. Submitting work which has been produced by someone else (e.g. allowing or contracting another person to do the work for which you claim authorship) is also plagiarism. Submitted work is subjected to a plagiarism detection process, which may include the use of text matching systems or interviews with students to determine authorship. Cheating includes (but is not limited to) asking or paying someone to complete an assessment task for you or any use of unauthorised materials or assistance during an examination or test. From Semester 1, 2016, all incoming coursework students are required to complete Curtins Academic Integrity Program (AIP). If a student does not pass the program by the end of their first study period of enrolment at Curtin, their marks will be withheld until they pass. More information about the AIP can be found at: https://academicintegrity.curtin.edu.au/students/AIP.cfm Refer to the Academic Integrity tab in Blackboard or academicintegrity.curtin.edu.au for more information, including student guidelines for avoiding plagiarism. Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Expectations Curtin students are expected to have reliable internet access in order to connect to OASIS email and learning systems such as Blackboard and Library Services. You may also require a computer or mobile device for preparing and submitting your work. For general ICT assistance, in the first instance please contact OASIS Student Support: oasisapps.curtin.edu.au/help/general/support.cfm For specific assistance with any of the items listed below, please contact The Learning Centre: life.curtin.edu.au/learning-support/learning_centre.htm l Using Blackboard, the I Drive and Back-Up files l Introduction to PowerPoint, Word and Excel DVC Education OUA Programs EDUC1013 EDC131 Language and Literacy for TeachersOUA 16 Feb 2017 OUA Programs, DVC Education Page: 8 of 15CRICOS Provider Code 00301JThe only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIShttps://academicintegrity.curtin.edu.au/students/AIP.cfmhttp://academicintegrity.curtin.edu.au/https://oasisapps.curtin.edu.au/help/general/support.cfmhttp://life.curtin.edu.au/learning-support/learning_centre.htmAdditional information Curtin School of Education Assessment Extension The Unit Coordinator is responsible for ensuring that the guidelines contained in the Curtin University Student Assessment and Progression policy are adhered to in their unit/s. The onus is on students to provide evidence that their inability to complete an assessment task by the due date can be accepted as being due to exceptional circumstances beyond the students control. Such exceptional circumstances that may warrant approval of an assessment extension include, but are not limited to: l Student injury, illness or medical condition of such significance that completion of the assessment task was not possible; l Family issues (eg family injury or illness, bereavement etc) of such significance that completion of the assessment task was not possible; l Commitments to participate in elite sport or other activities that warrant favourable consideration; l Commitments to assist with emergency service activities (eg bushfire protection); l Unavoidable and unexpected work commitments (eg relocation, changes to fly-infly-out schedules). These guidelines can be found in Curtin Universitys Assessment and Student Progression manual. Students will be notified of the outcome of their application for Assessment Extension within five working days of the application. For assignments or other submitted work, an extension will normally be granted up to seven days after the initial due date/time, unless the circumstances warrant a longer delay. If an application for Assessment Extension is rejected, the Unit Coordinator must provide reasons for her/his decision. Students have the right of appeal (to the Head of School). Corrupted or Unreadable Files Assessments are not considered as submitted if the electronic file is not readable. It is a students responsibility to ensure that assessments have been successfully uploaded in a readable format. It is strongly recommended that students check all uploaded assessments by re-accessing Blackboard and attempting to open and read the uploaded file. If a lecturer encounters a problem with a submitted file the student will be notified and must provide a readable file within 48 hours of this notification, after which it is considered as a late submission. Students should check their Curtin student email daily during the assessment marking period. Assessment Appeals Any student who genuinely believes that assessed work has been unfairly or inaccurately marked or that their final unit grade is inappropriate has the right to request a review of the mark or final result. If this review process is unable to resolve the issue, a formal assessment appeal may be lodged. It is expected that most situations will be able to be resolved without the need for a formal appeal. l Step 1 Initial Request for Review by marker or unit co-ordinator. This informal review will be to check that marking was accurate and complete. The work is not completely re-assessed. Marks cannot be reviewed downwards as a result of this informal process. l Step 2 Formal Appeal. If the appeal is upheld and the work re-assessed, this can then result in a mark that is higher, lower or the same as the original assessment. Student Support OUA students will find that most information they need can be found on our dedicated student support website: DVC Education OUA Programs EDUC1013 EDC131 Language and Literacy for TeachersOUA 16 Feb 2017 OUA Programs, DVC Education Page: 9 of 15CRICOS Provider Code 00301JThe only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIShttp://humanities.curtin.edu.au/schools/edu/oua/oua-professional-experience/ Some specific services offered to Curtin OUA students are below: Smarthinking through OUA This service is designed to supplement students learning experiences while studying at Open Universities Australia. Students are linked to a service administered outside the Blackboard environment and independent of Curtin University and OUA. Smarthinking enables students to connect to a tutor 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. More information is available on Blackboard. Note that Smarthinking tutors do not have any details relating to assessment tasks and so the help they offer may not align with actual assessment requirements. To access Smarthinking: 1. Sign in to My study centre at Open Universities Australia http://www.open.edu.au/ 2. From My courses & units select the Current units tab 3. Click on the Smarthinking link, next to the list of units For problems logging in, please contact the OUA Student Advisors by email advisors@open.edu.au or by telephone +61 03 8628 2555. Curtin Learning Centre l Comprehensive support for many aspects of students learning is offered through face to face and online resources via the Learning Centre http://unilife.curtin.edu.au/learning_support/learning_centre.htm Curtin Uni English l This website has been designed to support students whose first language is not English. The Curtin University UniEnglish website contains English language resources, activities, support information, and links to diagnostic assessment tests. http://unilife.curtin.edu.au/learning_support/UniEnglish.htm Curtin Counselling l All Curtin students are entitled to access Curtin Counseling for free, confidential and professional services. This includes online students who may require individual counselling for personal, psychological, or study-related issues (although please note that the counselling service is not the appropriate avenue for pursuing assessment queries or debates). http://unilife.curtin.edu.au/health_wellbeing/counselling_services.htm Enrolment It is your responsibility to ensure that your enrolment is correct - you can check your enrolment through the eStudent option on OASIS, where you can also print an Enrolment Advice. DVC Education OUA Programs EDUC1013 EDC131 Language and Literacy for TeachersOUA 16 Feb 2017 OUA Programs, DVC Education Page: 10 of 15CRICOS Provider Code 00301JThe only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIShttp://humanities.curtin.edu.au/schools/edu/oua/oua-professional-experience/http://www.open.edu.au/mailto:advisors@open.edu.auhttp://unilife.curtin.edu.au/learning_support/learning_centre.htmhttp://unilife.curtin.edu.au/learning_support/UniEnglish.htmhttp://unilife.curtin.edu.au/health_wellbeing/counselling_services.htmStudent Rights and Responsibilities It is the responsibility of every student to be aware of all relevant legislation, policies and procedures relating to their rights and responsibilities as a student. These include: l the Student Charter l Values and Signature Behaviours l the University's policy and statements on plagiarism and academic integrity l copyright principles and responsibilities l the University's policies on appropriate use of software and computer facilities Information on all these things is available through the University's "Student Rights and Responsibilities" website at: students.curtin.edu.au/rights. Student Equity There are a number of factors that might disadvantage some students from participating in their studies or assessments to the best of their ability, under standard conditions. These factors may include a disability or medical condition (e.g. mental illness, chronic illness, physical or sensory disability, learning disability), significant family responsibilities, pregnancy, religious practices, living in a remote location or another reason. If you believe you may be unfairly disadvantaged on these or other grounds please contact Student Equity at eesj@curtin.edu.au or go to http://eesj.curtin.edu.au/student_equity/index.cfm for more information You can also contact Counselling and Disability services: http://www.disability.curtin.edu.au or the Multi-faith services: http://life.curtin.edu.au/health-and-wellbeing/about_multifaith_services.htm for further information. It is important to note that the staff of the university may not be able to meet your needs if they are not informed of your individual circumstances so please get in touch with the appropriate service if you require assistance. For general wellbeing concerns or advice please contact Curtin's Student Wellbeing Advisory Service at: http://life.curtin.edu.au/health-and-wellbeing/student_wellbeing_service.htm Recent unit changes Students are encouraged to provide unit feedback through eVALUate, Curtin's online student feedback system. For more information about eVALUate, please refer to evaluate.curtin.edu.au/info/. Recent changes to this unit include: Assignments are being submitted through Turnitin Direct using qualitative rubrics for assessment. Assignment 2 and 3 tasks have been enhanced and the order of topics has been refined to include all content prior to the test. The unit has been re-designed to specifically identify a Professional Literacy strand, in addition to an Academic Literacy strand. The Professional Literacy strand emphasises the personal, creative literacy that teachers need in order to be effective teachers of writing in the primary classroom. A supplementary reading list of children's literature has been included in the unit. The list will be available to students via Blackboard. To view previous student feedback about this unit, search for the Unit Summary Report at https://evaluate.curtin.edu.au/student/unit_search.cfm. See https://evaluate.curtin.edu.au/info/dates.cfm to find out when you can eVALUate this unit. DVC Education OUA Programs EDUC1013 EDC131 Language and Literacy for TeachersOUA 16 Feb 2017 OUA Programs, DVC Education Page: 11 of 15CRICOS Provider Code 00301JThe only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIShttp://students.curtin.edu.au/rights/mailto:eesj@curtin.edu.auhttp://eesj.curtin.edu.au/student_equity/index.cfmhttp://www.disability.curtin.edu.au/http://life.curtin.edu.au/health-and-wellbeing/about_multifaith_services.htmhttp://life.curtin.edu.au/health-and-wellbeing/student_wellbeing_service.htmhttp://evaluate.curtin.edu.au/info/index.cfmhttps://evaluate.curtin.edu.au/student/unit_search.cfmhttps://evaluate.curtin.edu.au/info/dates.cfmProgram calendar Teaching week Begin date Topic Reading Learning Tasks are listed on Blackboard Assignment Due Module 1 Language 1 27/02/17 Topic 1 An Introduction to Langauge and Literacy. Academic Literacy Your own Literacy An introduction to referencing using APA style Reading 1. Subject Content (Ch 2). Gee, P. & Hayes, E. (2011). Language and Learning in the Digital Age. New York: Routledge. (pp 2-13). This whole text is available online through the library and is a good resource. Reading 2. Professional Literacy (Ch 7). Cremin, T. & Myhill, D. (2012) Writing Voices: Creating a Community of Writers. Abingdon: Routledge. (pp 121 134 writing teachers). Reading 3. Academic Literacy (Identifying Resources (ch 3&4). Grellier, J. & Goerke, V. (2014). Communications Toolkit. South Melbourne: Cengage. (pp 33-52 research skills). 2 06/03/17 Topic 2 Context, Language: Making Meanings in Social Contexts. Academic Literacy Grammar, Punctuation and Spelling Reading 1. Subject Content (Ch 1). Green, D. (2006) Understanding language and learning. In Campbell, R. & Green, D. (2006). Literacies and Learners. Current Perspectives (3rd Ed). Frenches Forest, N.S.W.: Pearson. (pp 1-23). Reading 2. Professional Literacy (ch 8). Cremin, T. & Myhill, D. (2012) Writing Voices: Creating a Community of Writers. Abingdon: Routledge. (pp 138 -151 teachers reviewing writing). Reading 3. Academic Literacy. Grellier, J. & Goerke, V. (2014). Communications Toolkit. South Melbourne: Cengage. (pp 180-204 grammar, punctuation and spelling). 3 13/03/17 Topic 3 Englishes (including Aboriginal English) Academic Literacy Essay Writing Reading 1. Subject Content (ch 6). Ewing, R., Callow, J. & Rushton, K. (2016) Language and Literacy Development in Early Childhood. Port Melbourne: Cambridge University Press. (pp 76 92 aboriginal perspectives). Reading 2. Professional Literacy (ch 11). Loane, G. & Muir, S. (2017) Developing Young Writers in the Classroom. Abingdon: Routledge. (pp 247 284 - using models). Reading 3. Academic Literacy. Grellier, J. & Goerke, V. (2014). Communications Toolkit. South Melbourne: Cengage. (pp 128-143 academic essay writing). 4 20/03/17 Topic 4 Language and Culture Reading 1. Subject Content (ch 3). Emmitt, M., Zbaracki, M., Komesaroff, L. & Pollock, J. (2010) Language & Learning. An Introduction for Teaching (5th Ed). South Melbourne: Oxford. (pp 48-81 language variation). DVC Education OUA Programs EDUC1013 EDC131 Language and Literacy for TeachersOUA 16 Feb 2017 OUA Programs, DVC Education Page: 12 of 15CRICOS Provider Code 00301JThe only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIS Reading 2. Professional Literacy (ch 1). Loane, G. & Muir, S. (2017) Developing Young Writers in the Classroom. Abingdon: Routledge. (pp 1 -9 the teacher of writing). Reading 3. Academic Literacy. Grellier, J. & Goerke, V. (2014). Communications Toolkit. South Melbourne: Cengage. (pp 160 -179 two principles of good academic writing).Module 2 Language and Learning 5 27/03/17 Topic 5 Understanding oral language Reading 1. Subject Content (ch 2). Fellowes, J. & Oakley, G.(2014). Language, Literacy and Early Childhood Education. South Melbourne: Oxford. (pp16-45 understanding oral language). Reading 2. Professional Literacy. There is no set reading in this strand this week so use the time to further develop your personal writing. Reading 3. Academic Literacy. Grellier, J. & Goerke, V. (2014). Communications Toolkit. South Melbourne: Cengage. (pp 53-72 referencing.) 6 03/04/17 Topic 6 Language development Reading 1. Subject Content (ch 3). Fellowes, J. & Oakley, G.(2014). Language, Literacy and Early Childhood Education. South Melbourne: Oxford. (pp 46-68 oral language). Reading 2. Professional Literacy. Gardner, P (2014) Becoming a teacher of writing: Primary student teachers reviewing their relationship with writing. English in Education, Vol 48, Issue 2, June 2014 pp128-148. Reading 3. Academic Literacy. Use the following site to revise aspects of grammar, e.g. pronouns, possessives, adverbials, determiners, clauses, phrases, sentences etc. https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/en/english-grammar Assignment One Due Academic Essay 40% Monday 3rd April 23:59 WST 7 10/04/17 Topic 7 Multiliteracies Reading 1. Subject Content. Read about multiliteracies at http://newlearningonline.com/multiliteracies View videos on multiliteracy at http://newlearningonline.com/multiliteracies/videos Reading 2. Professional Literacy Gardner, P. (2014) Who am I? Compositions of the self: an autoethnographic, rhizotextual analysis of two poetic texts. English in Education Vol 48, No. 3 pp 230 - 249 Reading 3. Academic Literacy. Grellier, J. & Goerke, V. (2014). Communications Toolkit. South Melbourne: Cengage. (pp 91-104- reflective writing). DVC Education OUA Programs EDUC1013 EDC131 Language and Literacy for TeachersOUA 16 Feb 2017 OUA Programs, DVC Education Page: 13 of 15CRICOS Provider Code 00301JThe only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIShttps://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/en/english-grammarhttp://newlearningonline.com/multiliteracieshttp://newlearningonline.com/multiliteracies/videos8 17/04/17 Topic 8 Perspectives of literacy? Reading 1. Subject Content (introduction). Winch, G., Ross Johnston, R.,March, P., Ljungdahl, L. & Holliday, M. (2014). Literacy. Reading, Writing & Childrens Literature (5th Ed.). South Melbourne: Oxford. (pp XXXlll-XLVl literacy in the modern world) Reading 2. Professional Literacy There is no set reading in this strand this week so use the time to further develop your personal writing. Reading 3. Academic Literacy Submit a new piece of writing to Grammerly and use the feedback to identify any aspects of syntax you need to improve https://app.grammarly.com/ 9 24/04/17 Topic 9 Learning to read Reading 1. Subject Content (ch 1 & 2) Winch, G., Ross Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L. & Holliday, M. (2014). Literacy. Reading, Writing & Childrens Literature (5th Ed.). South Melbourne: Oxford. (pp 4-36 A balanced view of reading; Towards a model of reading) Reading 2. Professional Literacy There is no set reading in this strand this week so use the time to further develop your personal writing. Reading 3. Academic Literacy. Use the following site to revise aspects of grammar, e.g. pronouns, possessives, adverbials, determiners, clauses, phrases, sentences etc. https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/en/english-grammar 10 01/05/17 Topic 10 Childrens literature Reading 1. Subject Content (ch 2) Anstey, M. & Bull, G. (2009). Developing new literacies: Responding to picture books in multiliterate ways. In J. Evans (Ed.), Talking beyond the page: Reading and responding to picture books. pp.26-43.London: Routledge Reading 2 Tunnell, M.O How to recognise a well written book. In Tunnell, M. O. & Jacobs, J.S. (2008). Children's literature briefly.(4th Ed) Upper Saddle River:Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall pp 18-28 Reading 3 Read a selection of books from the Units reading list of childrens literature and select one text on which to focus for assignment 2. 11 08/05/17 Topic 11 Learning to write Reading 1. Subject Content (ch1) Larson, J. & Marsh, J. (2005) Making literacy Real: theories and practices for learning and teaching. London: SAGE. (pp 1 17 orienting perspectives) Reading 2. Professional Literacy. There is no set reading in this strand this week so use the time to further develop your personal writing. DVC Education OUA Programs EDUC1013 EDC131 Language and Literacy for TeachersOUA 16 Feb 2017 OUA Programs, DVC Education Page: 14 of 15CRICOS Provider Code 00301JThe only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIShttps://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/en/english-grammarReading 3. Academic Literacy. Draft redraft edit and proof-read assignment 2 before submission. 12 15/05/17 Topic 12 The big picture: Literacy in the Australian Curriculum and Early Years Learning Framework Reading 1. Subject Content R Reading 2. Professional Literacy. There is no set reading in this strand this week so use the time to further develop your personal writing. Reading 3. Academic Literacy. Revise aspects of grammar and meta-language in preparation for the online test. Assignment Two Due Exercise 40% Monday15th May 23:59 WST 13 22/05/17 Review Please complete the Evaluate survey remembering to complete a Teaching Report where requested. Assignment Three Due Test 20% Monday 22nd May 23:59 WST DVC Education OUA Programs EDUC1013 EDC131 Language and Literacy for TeachersOUA 16 Feb 2017 OUA Programs, DVC Education Page: 15 of 15CRICOS Provider Code 00301JThe only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIS

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