dynamic export e-magazine sep/oct 2015

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Latest news for Australian exporters

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  • // 1// SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015

    SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2015

    PagE 12

    PagES 32-33 PagES 8-9 PagE 31

    PagE 15

    PagE 6

    EXPORTERS STRUGGLE TO UNDERSTAND FTAs

    WHY BUYING AGENTS ARE BIG BUSINESS IN CHINA

    HOW THE AUSSIE MADE LOGO CAN GIVE YOU AN EXPORT EDGE

    KEYS TO SUCCESSFUL FOOD EXPORT TO ASIA

    BOOM IN MEDICAL TECH EXPORTS

    LOCAL FASHION DESIGNER DRESSED FOR EXPORT SUCCESS

  • // 2// SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015

    a smarter way to trade

    From the editor

    Finally, theres a bright light at the end of the tunnel.

    Now is an exciting time to be an Australian exporter.

    The past year has seen some of the most significant developments in the Australian export sector for many years.

    The black cloud (a stubbornly high Australian dollar) that has been hanging over local exporters in recent years is lifting.

    The Australian dollar is steadily falling against major global currencies and the recent signing of a trifecta of key Free Trade Agreements with our major Asian trading partners should put a smile on the face of every Australian exporter.

    Welcome to the first edition of the new Dynamic Export eMagazine.

    In each bi-monthly edition we will highlight the latest issues in export and explain how those issues will affect you.

    Not only will we bring you the latest news, youll also get features, opinions and vital information needed to help grow your business.

    In this issue we focus on China, Japan and Korea FTAs and explain how they will benefit Australian exporters.

    And Barry Thomas, APAC Managing Director of Cook Medical Australia, explains how Australia is well placed to take advantage of the global demand for advanced medical technology.

    Also, David Rubie, Manager Industry Logistics at Dematic, reveals the keys to successful food export to Asia

    We also feature special reports on Australian Made, fashion, freight, export grants and explain why you may need a Trade Mark.

    Enjoy we look forward to your feedback.

    Tim michaelEDitor

    @dynamicexport

    Director and National Sales ManagerJulie Fletcherjulie@dynamicexport.com.au

    Our team

    Think Positive Pty Ltd cannot be held liable for any person(s), company or business acting upon or using the information provided in this e-magazine in any way. Information and content in Dynamic Export e-Magazine is provided to the best of our knowledge. We advise that you should seek independent professional advice to verify that all information is accurate and correct.

    EditorTim michaeleditor@dynamicexport.com.au

    ProductionVeronica avant

    IT ManagerRob Fearn

    Researchmark Zakoshanski

    Contributorsanthony Fensom, David Rubie, Barry Thomas

    Advertising enquiries: advertising@dynamicexport.com.au

    Editorial submissions: editor@dynamicexport.com.au

    www.dynamicexport.com.au

    Published by:Think Positive Pty ltdPO Box 221Waverley NSW 2024 australia

    editor@dynamicexport.com.au

  • // 3// SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015

    Australian medicine exports plunge by 30 percent

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    10-11

    15

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    21

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    26-27

    29

    30-31

    32-33

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    Feature

    CHINa Fta

    Feature

    JaPaN Fta

    MIDDLe eaSt

    traVeL

    IP/LeGaL

    e COMMerCe

    FaSHION

    Feature

    FOreIGN eXCHaNGe

    Global demand for advanced medical technology never stronger

    TPP in doubt, but Asia FTAs give exporters a boost

    Why buying agents are big business in China

    Opening new doors for Australian exporters

    Australia should look to Arab nations for meat exports

    Soon you can fly from New York to London in 3 hours

    Trade Marks examined

    How eCargo can open the door to China

    Melbourne designer finds key to export success

    The keys to successful food export to Asia

    Compass can point you in the right direction

    news

    nEWs

    NewS3-5

    6-7

    34-35

    auStraLIaN MaDe

    wHatS ON

    Australian medicines exports have declined by 30 percent in one year, according to latest industry

    figures.The huge decline highlights the

    enormous challenges facing the local industry as it struggles to remain competitive in the global pharmaceutical industry, says Medicines Australia, which represents the pharmaceutical industry in Australia.

    Five years ago, medicines were Australias largest manufactured export, bringing in more than $4 billion to the local economy, Medicines Australia says.

    Today, manufactured medicines have slipped to second place behind the motor vehicle industry. If the trend continues, medicine manufacturing will shortly drop to third.

    The latest figures released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics reveal that in the first six months of 2015, Australian manufacturing exports were $1.06 billion, compared to $1.49 billion in the first half of 2014, representing a 28.5 percent decline.

    Pharmaceutical exports were 30 percent lower in June 2015, compared to June 2014.

    Such a dramatic fall in the rankings should be ringing alarm bells in Canberra, Medicines Australia says.

    The body warns that Australia is set to miss out on enormous economic and job creating opportunities at a time of growing demand for innovative, safe and effective medicine products in Asia, particularly in China.

    It has called on the federal government to do more to encourage growth in the biopharmaceutical sector.

    Though the steadily falling Australian dollar is making medicine exports more competitive, this is not enough to reverse the trend.

    In a submission to the current Senate inquiry into Australias Innovation System, Medicines Australia outlined key principles to invigorate the Australian medicines industry, which included:

    secure the existing investment we have in Australia to ensure it stays here

    Encourage the development of Australias local bio-pharmaceutical sector and

    Attract new direct foreign investment to Australia.

    The submission argued that by following these key principles, Australia could take advantage of the Asia boom and at least double current medicine exports, but with stiff competition from other nations, the time to act is running out.

  • // 4// SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015

    news

    Australian lamb exports expected to soar

    Australian lamb exports are expected to hit record highs next year, boosted by the steadily falling Australian dollar.

    Farm incomes are increasing strongly for beef producers, recording an almost 100 percent year-on-year increase.

    Meat and Livestock Australia (MLA) is predicting a six per cent increase in exports almost a third higher than the five-year average.

    This follows a four per cent increase in shipments for the first half of 2015.

    The growth in lamb exports will be driven by a number of factors, including high levels of Australian production, the current weakness of the Australian dollar against the US dollar and high levels of demand from key export markets, the UKs Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board (AHDB) said in a recent statement.

    The declining volumes of mutton shipped is due to a fall in production and lower levels of demand from China.

    Mutton exports, in contrast, are expected to fall 23 per cent to 142,000 tonnes after last years high volumes.

    According to MLA Australian lamb exports in July declined 17 percent on levels last year, to 17,191 tonnes swt but were still 4 percent above the five-year monthly average.

    A report by the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences (ABARES), showed the high returns are the result of increased cattle prices and the highest beef cattle turn-off in 36 years.

    Minister for Agriculture, Barnaby Joyce said strong international demand for Australian beef and live cattle had resulted in higher beef cattle prices, pushing up farm gate returns.

    Beef producers in northern Australia have seen the most significant increase in farm cash incomes an average of $148,000 per farm in 2014-15, up from $74,700 in the previous year, representing a 98.1 per cent increase, or around 50 per cent above the average for the previous 10 years, Mr Joyce said.

    While in southern Australia, farm cash income of beef cattle producers is estimated to have increased from an average of $38,100 a farm in 2013-14 to $64,000 a farm in 2014-15.

    Increases in cattle sold for live export and higher cattle prices resulted in farm cash income in the northern live cattle export region increasing from an average of $143,000 a farm in 2013-14 to $277,000 a farm in 2014-15.

    Healthy returns for Australian beef producers

  • // 5// SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015

    news

    Education exports hit record highAustralias international education services sector reached a record

    This was a 14.2 per cent increase over the previous year.Australian Bureau of Statistics figures show that education is now by far the major service export, well ahead of tourism, which grew 5.1 per cent to $14.6 billion in 2014-15.

    Federal Education Minister Christopher Pyne said international education is a major employer, supporting about 130,000 Australian jobs.

    These figures confirm once again that international education remains Australias largest services export and our fourth largest export overall after iron ore, coal and natural gas, Mr Pyne said.

    The lower Australia dollar is a major factor boosting international student numbers, with the latest figures showing that enrolments in the first half of 2015 reached 465,000, 10.4 per cent above the same period last year. Universities and other higher education providers enrolled 222,000 of these

    students.The stro