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John Klingman's Fall 2009 Design Studio

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  • Dutch Dialogues Continuation : 4-5 Year Design Studio Fall 2009

    Tulane University School of Architecture

    Professor John P. Klingman

    Introduction

    Program

    Pedagogical Objective

  • Dutch Dialogues Continuation Fall 2009 Tulane University School of Architecture Professor John P. Klingman

    Project 1 Felicity Street Infill Canal/Cascade Neighborhood Waterhouse

    In the twentieth century an emphasis on citywide infrastructure projects was a dominant paradigm. New Orleans undertook centralized city water supply, sanitary sewer system and storm drainage along with electrical, communications and transportation systems. Hurricane Katrina severely damaged these systems, and their piecemeal repair has proceeded, but a twenty-first century paradigm has not been established. Under the auspices of the Dutch Dialogues engagement, it is now possible to project necessary and important new ideas for water infrastructure in New Orleans. In the neighborhood scale study of Dutch Dialogues II, principles emerged that can now be extended and tested through design. The principles begin with reestablishing a high level of groundwater to prevent subsidence, partially through a new network of wet constantly flowing canals. Secondly, greatly increased accommodation for rainwater is required, through a network of holding areas and cascades. Thirdly, establishing a reduced and possibly decentralized potable water system alongside of the rainwater system is considered if groundwater is a purer future source compared to river water. In relating these principles to the morphology of New Orleans, a radial canal system supplementing the existing subterranean canal system has been proposed by Dutch Dialogues. The streets that correspond to urban grid shifts, often early plantation boundaries seem particularly appropriate for this new system. Our test street will be Felicity, from the river to its lower end at Claiborne Avenue.

    Hydrology

    The hydrostatic pressure from the Mississippi River allows for a spring to be established nearby. This spring will provide a source for water constantly flowing in the proposed Felicity Street canal. In months of low water, Mississippi River water can be pumped into the canal as necessary. The canal acts as a groundwater recharge source during dry weather. During rainy weather, it becomes a component of the water retention/storm drainage system. Thus, an ability to accommodate differing flows is an important characteristic of the canal design. Adjacent to the canal will be other water holding components. These will include the streets in limited capacity, green spaces and holding ponds. It is also anticipated that buildings along the canal could house elevated storage of rainwater for community and individual use.

    Felicity Street Canal/Cascade

    The canal needs to be continuous, but it can shift plan location to respond to existing conditions of trees, utilities, building entrances, etc. The street section will be completely redesigned. However, a twelve-foot fire lane is required, and every building must have public pedestrian access. It is assumed that parking for buildings along the canal will be elsewhere on the block. The canal right of way also has strong potential as a recreational amenity for biking, running, etc. Each longitudinal street will bridge the canal. At these locations a cascade, perhaps with a movable weir can be considered. In dry weather the canal may carry moving water only a few inches deep. In rainy weather the canal becomes part of the storm water retention/discharge system. Thus its capacity will enlarge. This water is contaminated with urban detritus so bioremedial strategies are encouraged. It is important to propose locations adjacent to the canal where water holding can be accommodated. The closer the site is to the lake, the greater the requirement for water holding.

  • Neighborhood Waterhouse

    STUDENTS

    SPECIAL THANKS TO OUTSIDE PROFESSIONALS:

  • 5FELICITY STREET CANAL Prof. Klingman_Fall 2009_Matt Hostetler

  • 6FELICITY STREET CANAL Prof. Klingman_Fall 2009_Matt Mostetler

  • 7FELICITY STREET CANAL Prof. Klingman_Fall 2009_Nick Cecchi

  • 8FELICITY STREET CANAL Prof. Klingman_Fall 2009_Nick Cecchi

  • 9FELICITY STREET CANAL Prof. Klingman_Fall 2009_Corey Green + Colin Van Wingen

  • 10

    FELICITY STREET CANAL Prof. Klingman_Fall 2009_Joseph Kepple + Christian Rodriguez

  • 11

    FELICITY STREET CANAL Prof. Klingman_Fall 2009_Joseph Keppel + Christian Rodriguez

  • 12

    FELICITY STREET CANAL Prof. Klingman_Fall 2009_Joseph Keppel + Christian Rodriguez

  • 13

    FELICITY STREET CANAL Prof. Klingman_Fall 2009_Travis Bost + Krisitan Mizes

    RAIN

    RUN-OFFFILTER

    CANAL

    process_filtration

    diagram_block features

    2

    1

    3

    4

    5

    open lotsparking lots

    pixel field

    run-off filtration zone

    pixel crossing

    marsh park

    floodable skate park

    The design addresses the large percentage of surroundinng real estate currently empty or used as parking lots by collecting and filtering the resulting large quantity of run-off then introducing it into the larger canal system. Public interaction with the canal is promote by creating a language of concrete pixels that protrude from the water and create opportuni-ties for local eco-system development as well as make a visual connection to indigenous cypress swamps, further encouraging water filtration. Finally, the right of way of the former Felicity Street nearly doubles in width at Baronne street which becomes an opportunity for variable large-capacity storage. The canal is therefore split with one with one channel periodically occupiable as a skate park and the other continuously filled, further promoting public engagement with the water.

    strategy_surface run-offdiagram_open lots

  • 14

    FELICITY STREET CANAL Prof. Klingman_Fall 2009_Travis Bost + Kristian Mizes

    12'8'4'0'

    The shift of the streetgrid leaves a triangular piece of public land, normally unusable. This land is enveloped into the canal scheme as a skatepark which provides presently lacking recreation opportunity as well as large water storage in times of high precipitation.

    The park suspended above features a shifting topography allowing the high water to permeate the landscape while filtering run-off at all times into the canal.

    The second parallel canal is possible as the right of way doubles in width at the block and is used as variable storage, remaining dry in low to normal water levels and filled in times of flash flooding.

    perspective_marsh park section_double canal + marsh park

    perspective_skatepark

    water levels_skatepark + occupiable canal

    section_double canal + skatepark

  • 15

    FELICITY STREET CANAL Prof. Klingman_Fall 2009_Travis Bost + Kristian Mizes

    5 30 12

    The pixel crossing is a bridge of concrete blocks with varying heights that become an opportunity for interaction with the water as well as a home for micro-organisms and plant life.

    The run-off filtration zones each are built as urban constructed wetlands with layers of large aggregate for filtration and soils for plant life, further filtering run-off. The zones use the same reef-like forms to create filtrating plant environments to receive the water shed from streets and parking lots.

    section_pixel crossing

    perspective_pixel crossing

    perspective_run-off filter zone

  • 16

    FELICITY STREET CANAL Prof. Klingman_Fall 2009_Travis Bost + Kristian Mizes

    12 5 32 0-32

    8'6'4' 10'

    mulchsoil + plantsloamy sandaggregategeotextile

    The large pixel field takes advantage of a previously unusable triangle of public space as well as a portion of an existing street to create a public park that exposes its ecological advantages to its users. The main canal carries at all times at least a low level of water while expanding into the pixel field in higher levels. The park is reminescent of indigenous cypress swamps of the area.

    water levels_skatepark + pixel field

    perspective_pixel fieldsection_detail run-off filter zone

    section_pixel field

  • 17

    FELICITY STREET CANAL Prof. Klingman_Fall 2009_Monica Breziner

  • 18

    FELICITY STREET CANAL Prof. Klingman_Fall 2009_Monica Breziner

  • 19

    FELICITY STREET CANAL Prof. Klingman_Fall 2009_Monica Breziner

  • 20

    FELICITY STREET CANAL Prof. Klingman_Fall 2009_Monica Breziner

  • 21

    FELICITY STREET CANAL Prof. Klingman_Fall 2009_Caitlin McElrath

  • 22

    FELICITY STREET CANAL Prof. Klingman_Fall 2009_Caitlin McElrath

  • 23

    FELICITY STREET CANAL Prof. Klingman_Fall 2009_Cat Kochanski

  • 24

    FELICITY STREET CANAL Prof. Klingman_Fall 2009_Cat Kochanski

  • 25

    FELICITY STREET CANAL Prof. Klingman_Fall 2009_Cat Kochanski

  • 26

    FELICITY STREET CANAL Prof. Klingman_Fall 2009_Cat Kochanski

  • 27

    FELICITY STREET CANAL Prof. Klingman_Fall 2009_Chad Cramer

  • 28

    FELICITY STREET CANAL Prof. Klingman_Fall 2009_Chad Cramer

  • Dutch Dialogues Continuation Fall 2009 Tulane University School of Architecture Professor John P. Klingman

    Project 2 Hoffman Triangle Lake District Claiborne Avenue Edge

    In the twentieth century an emphasis on citywide infrastructure projects was a dominant paradigm. New Orleans undertook centralized city water supply, sanitary sewer system and storm drainage along with electrical,