cthenergywhitepaper-securing australias energy future

Download CthEnergyWhitePaper-Securing Australias Energy Future

Post on 05-Apr-2018

218 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • 7/31/2019 CthEnergyWhitePaper-Securing Australias Energy Future

    1/104

    SECURING AUSTRALIAS

    ENERGY FUTURE

  • 7/31/2019 CthEnergyWhitePaper-Securing Australias Energy Future

    2/104

    Prime Minister

    CANBERRA

    PRIME MINISTERS FOREWORD

    Our nations enormous energy resources are a source of considerable prosperity for

    all Australians. They provide access to low cost energy for businesses and householdsacross the land. Energy exports deliver more than $24 billion a year in export income

    to Australia, and low-cost energy supports the competitiveness of significant parts of

    our industrial base. Our energy industries, which directly employ 120 000 Australians,

    have an enviable record of providing energy when and where it is needed.

    Looking forward, Australia has an opportunity to play a major role in supplying the world

    with energy, and energy-related products. Australia remains the largest exporter of coal.

    New and existing projectssuch as the North West Shelf gas projectwill provide billions

    of dollars of export income and economic activity into the future. Proposals for developing

    other large gas fields are being actively worked on. Continuing the reliable delivery of

    competitively-priced energy to industry and households will underpin jobs and growth.

    Australia must grasp this opportunity while improving the sustainability of energy

    production and use. Energy is a major contributor to global greenhouse gas emissions,

    and although Australia is a small contributor to global emissions, we will play an active

    role in developing an effective global response to climate change. We will also move

    strongly to reduce the cost of meeting any future greenhouse constraints, without

    harming the competitiveness of our energy and energy dependent industries in the

    meantime. Our goal is to place Australia in a strong position to respond to the challenge

    of climate change, while maintaining a prosperous economy.

    Three themesprosperity, security, and sustainabilityunderpin the governments

    approach to energy policy. The Australian Government has undertaken a comprehensive

    review of its energy policies and approaches, and has developed a long-term framework

    to ensure our energy advantage is utilised for the benefit of all Australians.

    The framework is backed up by substantial new initiatives, including additional incentives

    to encourage petroleum exploration in frontier areas; a comprehensive reform of fuel

    taxation to reduce the cost of fuel in business use; innovative trials of solar technology

    teamed with leading edge efficiency technologies to demonstrate solar cities of the

    future; a fund to generate at least $1.5 billion in investment to demonstrate low-emissiontechnologies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from our energy sector; extra effort to

    back up our world first Renewable Energy Target with new commercialisation assistance

    for emerging renewable technologies; and a wide ranging effort to ensure the careful,

    prudent use of our valuable energy resources by industry and the community.

    The policy framework outlined in this statement has a single, simple purposeto secure

    Australias energy future.

    (John Howard)

  • 7/31/2019 CthEnergyWhitePaper-Securing Australias Energy Future

    3/104

    v

    LIST OF FIGURES ix

    LIST OF TABLES xiii

    OVERVIEW 1

    CHAPTER 1. ENERGY IN AUSTRALIA 35

    Why is energy important? 35

    Australias energy sector 36

    The policy environment 41

    CHAPTER 2. DEVELOPING AUSTRALIAS ENERGY RESOURCES 45

    Introduction 46

    The potential resource rewardsThe Woodside story 49

    Staying competitive 51

    Prospectivity 53

    Political, policy and regulatory risk 58

    Infrastructure 61

    Access to commercial markets 61

    Fiscal regimes and incentives 62

    Looking forward 64

    CHAPTER 3. ENERGY MARKETSDELIVERING AUSTRALIAS

    ELECTRICITY AND GAS NEEDS 65Introduction 66

    The urgency of reform 68

    Energy market issues 70

    Progress to date 71

    A national energy policy framework 74

    December 2003 action plan 77

    New electricity-generating technologies 78

    Looking forward 79

    CONTENTS

    Commonwealth of Australia 2004

    ISBN 0 646 43547 7

    This work is copyright. Apart from any use as permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, no part may be

    reproduced by any process without prior written permission from the Australian Government, available

    from the Department of C ommunications, Information Technology and the Arts. Requests and enquiries

    concerning reproduction and rights should be addressed to the Commonwealth Copyright Administration,

    Intellectual Property Branch, Department of Communications, Information Technology and the Arts,

    GPO Box 2154, Canberra ACT 2601, or posted at htt p://www.dcita.gov.au/cca.

    Produced by the Energy Task Force

    Printed by Goanna PrintDesigned by RTM Design

    Contact Officer: Sean Innis

    Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet

    3-5 National Circuit

    BARTON ACT 2600

    Telephone: 02 6271 5680

    Facsimile: 02 6271 5802

    Web address for this report: www.pmc.gov.au/energy_future

  • 7/31/2019 CthEnergyWhitePaper-Securing Australias Energy Future

    4/104

    viivi

    CHAPTER 4. ENERGY MARKETSDELIVERING AUSTRALIAS

    TRANSPORT FUEL NEEDS 81

    Introduction 82Meeting the demand for fuel 83

    Refineries 85

    Wholesalers/distributors and retailers 86

    Market regulation 88

    The role of fuel standards 89

    Alternative fuels 90

    Looking forward 92

    CHAPTER 5. FUEL EXCISE REFORM 93

    Introduction 94

    Excise on alternative fuels 96

    Fuel excise relief for business and households 97

    Supporting the road transport task 99

    Reducing the compliance burden on business 101Excise reform timetable 102

    Meeting environmental responsibilities 103

    Looking forward 104

    CHAPTER 6. ENERGY EFFICIENCY 105

    Introduction 106

    What is energy efficiency? 106

    Australias energy efficiency performance 106

    Scope and benefits 108

    Business benefits from improved energy efficiency 108

    Government action 110

    Improving market signals 111

    Sett in g mi ni mu m stan da rds and improvi ng in forma tio n 111

    Identifying energy efficiency opportunities 112Streamlining requirements 113

    Looking forward 113

    CHAPTER 7. ENERGY SECURITY 115

    Introduction 116

    Australias energy security position 116

    Transport fuels 118

    World oil supplies 120

    Australias involvement in IEA and APEC energy security mechanisms 122

    Alternative sources of transport fuels 123

    Responding to disruptions 124

    Electricity and gas 126

    Long-term security of gas supplies 128

    Looking forward 130CHAPTER 8. CLIMATE CHANGE AND ENERGY 131

    Introduction 132

    Sources of emissions 132

    Gre enh ouse emi ss ion s and th e Austral ian en ergy secto r 133

    Australias approach to climate change 137

    Meeting the Kyoto target 138

    Types of low emission technologies 143

    Looking forward 149

    CHAPTER 9. ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT 151

    Introduction 152

    Air quality impacts 153

    Environmental impacts of energy projects 157

    Examples of energy pro jects assessed under the EPBC Act 159Looking forward 161

    CHAPTER 10. INNOVATIONBUILDING A BRIDGE TO THE FUTURE 163

    Introduction 164

    What is energy innovation? 164

    Government support for innovation 165

    Government support for energy innovation 166

    Australias place in global energy innovation 168

    International cooperation 170

    Economic development with a lower emissions signature 171

    Looking forward 172

    ANNEXTechnology assessments 173

    APPENDICES

    Summary of measures 175

    Abbreviations 187

    References 191

  • 7/31/2019 CthEnergyWhitePaper-Securing Australias Energy Future

    5/104

    ix

    LIST OF FIGURES

    OVERVIEW

    Figure 1. Composition of Australian energy supply 4

    Figure 2. Depletable resources at current production levels 5

    Figure 3. Map of Australias offshore frontier basins 8

    Figure 4. Comparison of Industrial Energy Prices 4th quarter 2002 10

    Figure 5. Petrol prices in OECD countries including tax,

    December quarter 2003 13

    Figure 6. Retail market share 2003 14Figure 7. Economic and environmental gains from demand side

    management and energy efficiency 18

    Figure 8. Energy efficiency potential 19

    Figure 9. Net import dependency in 2000 for crude oil,

    coal and natural gas 21

    Figure 10. World oil supply disruptions 22

    Figure 11. Share of global energy based CO 2 emissions 24

    Figure 12. Timing and magnitude of reductions in emission standards

    for new passenger vehicles 28

    CHAPTER 1. ENERGY IN AUSTRALIA

    Figure 1. Australian primary energy consumption historical

    and projected 36

    Figure 2. Composition of Australian energy supply 38Figure 3. Energy inputs into electricity generation 39

    Figure 4. Total Australian final energy consumption 40

    Figure 5. Estimated greenhouse emissions by sector in 2002 40

    Figure 6. Greenhouse gas emission projections 41

    CHAPTER 2. DEVELOPING AUSTRALIAS ENERGY RESOURCES

    Figure 1. Wor

Recommended

View more >