Basis of a Healthy Diet How do we make good choices?

Download Basis of a Healthy Diet How do we make good choices?

Post on 30-Mar-2015

213 views

Category:

Documents

1 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

<ul><li>Slide 1</li></ul> <p>Basis of a Healthy Diet How do we make good choices? Slide 2 Practical Steps to Take Consume a variety of foods Consume a variety of foods Dont over-consume any one food Dont over-consume any one food Moderation Moderation Nutrient density- ratio of nutrient needs met by food to energy needs Nutrient density- ratio of nutrient needs met by food to energy needs Energy density energy content/weight of food Energy density energy content/weight of food Slide 3 States of Nutritional Health Balanced Nutrition Balanced Nutrition Under nutrition Under nutrition Overnutrition Overnutrition Slide 4 Measuring Nutritional Status Anthorpmetic measures Anthorpmetic measures Height Weight Per cent body fat Food Diary Food Diary Slide 5 Caloric and Nutritional Density Caloric (energy) density- the kcal content provided per gram of food weight Caloric (energy) density- the kcal content provided per gram of food weight High: fried foods, sweets Low: many fruits and vegetables Calculate by: kcal of food/weight of food in g Nutritional density- ratio derived by dividing a foods contribution to nutrient needs by its contribution to energy needs Nutritional density- ratio derived by dividing a foods contribution to nutrient needs by its contribution to energy needs High: milk Low: soda Calculate by: (kcal of food/weight of food in g) x % Daily value of vitamin/mineral Slide 6 Measures of Nutritional Needs Measures set based on nutrition research Measures set based on nutrition research These are averages Dietary reference intakes (DRIs) set by the Food and Nutrition Board of the National Academy of Sciences: Dietary reference intakes (DRIs) set by the Food and Nutrition Board of the National Academy of Sciences: Estimated Average Requirements (EARs) Recommended Daily Allowances (RDAs) Adequate Intakes (AIs) Tolerable Upper Intake Levels (ULs) Slide 7 Estimated Average Requirements Estimates which meet the needs of 50% of the individuals of a specific age and gender Estimates which meet the needs of 50% of the individuals of a specific age and gender Based on a physiological marker such as the activity of a specific enzyme or the maintenance of healthy cell function Based on a physiological marker such as the activity of a specific enzyme or the maintenance of healthy cell function Slide 8 Recommended Dietary Allowances RDAs are averages of the required nutrient intakes which will meet the needs of 97 to 98% of the individuals in a specific gender, age group RDAs are averages of the required nutrient intakes which will meet the needs of 97 to 98% of the individuals in a specific gender, age group RDA = EAR X 1.2 RDA = EAR X 1.2 Slide 9 Adequate Intakes When there is not enough information available to set EARs and RDAs then this measure is used When there is not enough information available to set EARs and RDAs then this measure is used Based on observed or experimental information Based on observed or experimental information Slide 10 EERs and ULs Estimated Energy Requirements are rough estimates of energy needs Estimated Energy Requirements are rough estimates of energy needs Energy needs depend on level of activity Energy needs depend on level of activity Tolerable Upper Intake Levels are estimates of the maximal amount of a specific nutrient that should be ingested in a day. Tolerable Upper Intake Levels are estimates of the maximal amount of a specific nutrient that should be ingested in a day. Amounts greater than ULs may cause health problems Amounts greater than ULs may cause health problems Slide 11 Use of these measures All of these measures are intended to be guidelines for planning a healthy diet All of these measures are intended to be guidelines for planning a healthy diet They are meant to be used in conjunction with other information such as age, gender, level of physical activity, general health etc They are meant to be used in conjunction with other information such as age, gender, level of physical activity, general health etc Slide 12 The Food Pyramid Designed for a quick way to assess food intake Designed for a quick way to assess food intake Consists of 6 groups Consists of 6 groups Breads, cereal, rice, pasta (6-11 servings) Fruits (2-4 servings) Vegetables (3-5 servings) Milk, yogurt, cheese (2-3 servings) Meat (2-3 servings) Fats and sweets Slide 13 The Food Pyramid Menu planning with the Food Pyramid Menu planning with the Food Pyramid Does not apply to infants under 2 years No one food is essential to good nutrition. Each food is deficient in at least one nutrient. No one food group provides ass essential nutrients in adequate amounts. Variety of using different groups and different foods in each group is essential for nutrition. Foods within each group can vary widely in nutrient and energy content. Slide 14 Slide 15 Slide 16 Slide 17 Slide 18 Food Labels The FDA requires most food items must now be labeled with nutritional info The FDA requires most food items must now be labeled with nutritional info Exceptions: fresh meat, fresh produce Usually based on a 2000 kcal/day diet Usually based on a 2000 kcal/day diet Serving size info must be consistent among foods of the same kind Serving size info must be consistent among foods of the same kind Ingredients are listed in descending order by weight Ingredients are listed in descending order by weight Slide 19 Slide 20 Slide 21 Food Labeling There are very specific guidelines required in the labeling of food There are very specific guidelines required in the labeling of food Using the text book and the labels on the foods provided Using the text book and the labels on the foods provided Detremine what specific information can be found on the labels How could that information be used in helping to plan meals What possible pit falls are there in the lableling? Rank from highest to lowest foods that are most energy dense. Then do the same for the foods that are most nutrient dense </p>