Artists' Century: Irish Self-Portraits and Selected Works, 1900-2000by Paula Murphy

Download Artists' Century: Irish Self-Portraits and Selected Works, 1900-2000by Paula Murphy

Post on 18-Jan-2017

217 views

Category:

Documents

4 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

<ul><li><p>Irish Arts Review</p><p>Artists' Century: Irish Self-Portraits and Selected Works, 1900-2000 by Paula MurphyReview by: Ann CreminIrish Arts Review Yearbook, Vol. 17 (2001), p. 180Published by: Irish Arts ReviewStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20493197 .Accessed: 16/06/2014 08:50</p><p>Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms &amp; Conditions of Use, available at .http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp</p><p> .JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range ofcontent in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new formsof scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org.</p><p> .</p><p>Irish Arts Review is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to Irish Arts ReviewYearbook.</p><p>http://www.jstor.org </p><p>This content downloaded from 185.44.78.115 on Mon, 16 Jun 2014 08:50:46 AMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions</p><p>http://www.jstor.org/action/showPublisher?publisherCode=iarhttp://www.jstor.org/stable/20493197?origin=JSTOR-pdfhttp://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsphttp://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp</p></li><li><p>Book Reviews </p><p>Dream Collection', which proves most useful with well researched pointers on the pros and cons of buying art at auction </p><p>which really is quite a simple procedure but one by which the uninitiated feel daunted. I am not quite sure what Maggie </p><p>Britton's article entitled 'A Romance of Irish Art' is doing in this volume having also been seen, more appropriately, in the Irish Antique Dealers Association Yearbook last year but the illustrations are good. </p><p>The editor and compiler of the guide, Roberta Reeners, also provides an introduc tion in which she attempts to explain the </p><p>phenomenon of the rise in the Irish art mar </p><p>ket and identifies some of the main movers. This guide does most of what it sets out </p><p>to do and in an attractive fashion, despite the fact that the typesetter was unable to </p><p>locate the caps key on their keyboard. I do </p><p>not expect to see the next edition for a </p><p>few years when a reasonable bank of prices will have been built up again. I, for one, </p><p>will not be holding my breath. </p><p>JAMES O'HALLORAN is a Director of the James Adam </p><p>Salerooms. </p><p>Artists' Century: Irish Self-Portraits and Selected Works, 1900-2000 .................................................................................................................................................................. BY PAULA MURPHY .................................................................................................................................................................. </p><p>Gandon Editions 1999 p/b </p><p>228 pp. 210 col ills 0946846-448 .................................................................................................................................................................. </p><p>Ann Cremin </p><p>This nicely-produced volume from the indefatigable Gandon Press reflects on one </p><p>hundred years of Irish artists by means of </p><p>one self-portrait and one representative work. </p><p>The listing is by no means exhaustive </p><p>since its premise meant that self-portraits had to be available in the first place. It </p><p>was published on the occasion of a millen </p><p>nium exhibition organised jointly by the RHA, the Ormeau Baths Gallery and the </p><p>National Self-Portrait Collection of Ireland. It is a handsome volume, with the </p><p>works speaking for themselves on double pages: the self-portrait facing an 'impor tant' work. The catalogue notes were </p><p>compiled by Paula Murphy of UCD and </p><p>she has written an informative text, </p><p>retracing the history of Irish painting over </p><p>SELF-PORTRAIT BY JOHN LUKE: From Artists' Century: Irish Self-Portraits and Selected Works, 1900-2000 by Paula Murphy. Called The Tipster, this self-portrait </p><p>from the Ulster Museum was exhibited alongside the artist's The Road to the West from the same collection. </p><p>the past century. She situates the historic context leading to the muted develop </p><p>ment of the visual arts in Ireland before </p><p>the Second World War and the recent </p><p>freedom, in every sense, experienced by the current generation of artists, whether they are working in Ireland or abroad, such as Richard Gorman or Kathy </p><p>Prendergast, to mention just two of the leading lights. </p><p>It is quite amusing to see the way in </p><p>which the artists view themselves, as well as the works chosen to represent them. </p><p>Robert Ballagh gives us the full frontal treatment in Upstairs, 3, as well as show </p><p>ing a more classical self-portrait. Other artists are more coy about their own images as Camille Souter demonstrates with her 'image' as a fish in Achill, alongside an </p><p>earlier painting, Slaughtered Cow, Ten Minutes Dead (premonitions of Damien Hirst?). I enjoyed the Pretty Fierce Self-por trait by Norah MacGuinness which is </p><p>indeed a very apt description. Alice Maher is more allusive with her Self-Portrait: Four </p><p>Views (of hair), braided or otherwise, whereas Eilis O'Connell has gone to the </p><p>other extreme with her startling Life-Mask. ANN CREMIN is an international art critic based in Paris. </p><p>Buildings of County Armagh .................................................................................................................................................................. BY C E B BRETr WITH PHOTOGRAPHY BY </p><p>MICHAEL O'CONNELL .................................................................................................................................................................. </p><p>Ulster Archaeological Heritage Society 1999 h/b ?28 </p><p>286 pp. 24 col 236 b/w ills 0-900457-54-6 .................................................................................................................................................................. </p><p>Jeremy Williams </p><p>Before Sir Charles Brett published his Buildings of County Antrim in 1996, it was </p><p>suggested that he should defer to Alistair Rowan and his co-authors and wait until </p><p>the completion of their Buildings of Ireland. He replied that this would entail a ban of </p><p>many years on writing on Irish architec </p><p>ture and went ahead. Four years later, </p><p>with no further Buildings of Ireland volume on Ulster in sight, he has brought out a </p><p>companion volume, Buildings of County Armagh, written with such vigour over two years that we may all hope to see the </p><p>further four counties so magisterially sur </p><p>veyed and so observantly photographed by Michael O'Connell </p><p>The first entry is the Neolithic tomb of </p><p>Clontygora, 'a surprisingly attractive and </p><p>moving place, considering how boring some cairns can be.' The second last entry </p><p>on the Edward Saunderson memorial ends </p><p>thus: 'and yet a smile is raised by the </p><p>sweep and clarity with which the sculptor </p><p>represents frock-coat, watch-chain, whiskers and waist-coat buttons, all the </p><p>more so when the statue is seasonably </p><p>decorated with a long, old-fashioned, Orange sash, the bottom attached to a </p><p>trouser-leg with string.' Indeed the text is </p><p>peppered with personal opinions and there </p><p>is significantly more than architecture being assessed within these pages but </p><p>without recourse to dry English platitudes or honeyed southern Irish hypocrisy - </p><p>note, for example, his brief essay on </p><p>thatched cottages. While the city of Armagh has been well </p><p>studied, south Armagh has been totally unknown until now. The elegance of the </p><p>neo-Classical villas of Beech Hill, that I </p><p>have glimpsed from the road, and Acton, </p><p>that I have glimpsed from the train, </p><p>receive their due for the first time. Acton, </p><p>with its elliptical dining room projecting into the valley below, is extraordinarily </p><p>sophisticated. Sir Charles resists stylistic attributions but it is difficult to believe that </p><p>1 80 </p><p>IRISH ARTS REVIEW </p><p>This content downloaded from 185.44.78.115 on Mon, 16 Jun 2014 08:50:46 AMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions</p><p>http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp</p><p>Article Contentsp. 180</p><p>Issue Table of ContentsIrish Arts Review Yearbook, Vol. 17 (2001), pp. I-LIV, 1-218Front MatterA Diary of the Art Year in Ireland [pp. 1-25]Jeanne Sheehy 1939-99 [pp. 26-27]Changes at Irish Arts Review [p. 27-27]Purring with Pleasure: The New Chester Beatty Library [pp. 28-33]Frederick Prussia Plowman: A Dublin Painter of the Late-18th Century [pp. 34-36]A Lost Leader: M. J. McNamara and the Arts and Crafts Movement in Cork [pp. 37-43]Bleak House: The Pollexfen Ancestry of the Yeats Family [pp. 44-47]In the Shadow of the Sidhe: Arthur Kingsley Porter's Vision of an Exotic Ireland [pp. 48-60]'Irish Artists on Irish Subjects': The Cooper Collection in the National Library [pp. 61-69]William Dargan and the Worcester Shakespeare Service [pp. 70-79]A Colourful Spectacle Restored: The State Coach of the Lord Mayor of Dublin [pp. 80-87]A Capital Tale: Some Relicts of Pearce's Parliament House Rediscovered [pp. 88-95]The Elusive Sir Edward Lovett Pearce [pp. 96-106]New Irish Architecture: The Architectural Year Reviewed [pp. 107-113]From Dublin to the Far East: An Tr Gloine Stained Glass in Singapore [pp. 114-121]'Joannes Clericus': The Life and Work of the Revd John Rooney [pp. 122-126]The Intemperate Life of Thomas Frederick Collier [pp. 127-132]The Practical and the Decorative: The Kildare Estate Maps of John Rocque [pp. 133-140]Soundings: The Paintings of Mark Francis [pp. 141-149]Postcards from Brittany: Walter Osborne's Wallet of Photographs [pp. 150-155]'The Science of Elegant Luxury': Johnstown Castle [pp. 156-165]Book ReviewsReview: untitled [p. 166-166]Review: untitled [p. 167-167]Review: untitled [p. 168-168]Review: untitled [pp. 168-169]Review: untitled [pp. 169-170]Review: untitled [pp. 170-171]Review: untitled [p. 171-171]Review: untitled [pp. 171-172]Review: untitled [pp. 172-173]Review: untitled [p. 173-173]Review: untitled [pp. 173-174]Review: untitled [p. 174-174]Review: untitled [p. 175-175]Review: untitled [p. 176-176]Review: untitled [pp. 176-177]Review: untitled [pp. 177-178]Review: untitled [pp. 178-179]Review: untitled [pp. 179-180]Review: untitled [p. 180-180]Review: untitled [pp. 180-181]Review: untitled [pp. 181-182]Review: untitled [pp. 182-183]Review: untitled [p. 184-184]Review: untitled [pp. 185-186]Review: untitled [pp. 186-187]Review: untitled [pp. 187-188]Review: untitled [pp. 188-189]Review: untitled [pp. 189-190]Review: untitled [p. 190-190]</p><p>New Auction Records 2000 [pp. 191-194]Price Guide to Irish Art [pp. 195-217]Back Matter</p></li></ul>