architectural portfolio

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Selection of works from my undergraduate studies.

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  • 3ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN PHILOSOPHY

    Contemporary generations of architects and developers will likely be remembered for their investments in the foundations of the environmental movement. Changes in material consumption, effi cient use of passive and active environmental systems, support of anti-consumerist ideals, autonomous construction, integration of urban and agricultural environs, and the ease of trans-architectural palettes has diversifi ed the fi eld of architecture all across the board. Architecture is in itself a material and spatial thing, and as a result, the response and impact on the natural context is a crucial part of design development. At its essence, environmental response is also a social concept, as the atmosphere, energy (fi gurative and technical), and the interface of a space have an over-whelming effect on the overall health of the user experiencing it. By taking steps to understand these integrated concepts as layers of design, the architectural process can be responsibly comprehensive, demonstrating con-siderations that fl exibly balance many performance imperatives and interests, invoking research, experiments, and practice, ultimately forging into the next frontier of design.

    In this respect, the responsible expression of materials and the inclusion of new ways of thought are essential to the growth and exploration in the architectural fi eld. Due to its material and experiential nature, the importance and identity of architecture does not emerge from any one piece of construction, but through the ideas and words of the people who experience it, making the evolution and procession of our ideas as culturists, commu-nity activists, artists, engineers and businessmen/women absolutely crucial. As our culture grows and evolves, so should our articulation in architecture, as design is not a static thing. Architecture should be designed with this in mind, emphasizing that the things that are designed and constructed today will become our history tomorrow, and will probably not be as relevant in its intended purpose; architecture needs to be pliable and renewable. This does not mean that those infl exible designs are useless, by any means; it simply implies that the use and purpose of all things evolve, while the original shell serves only as a supposition of what it used to be.

    Architecture has come to embrace the concept of integrated design, which is both an organized collaboration between disciplines and a knitting of building systems to create a product that is socially, economically, environ-mentally and programmatically responsible. The balancing of people, prosperity and planet creates an equal basis for which any user can identify with, regardless of the scope or intended purpose, resulting in the maximum quality and probability of success in architectural design.

  • // ARCHITECTURAL PORTFOLIO THEORY & CONTENT

    The various projects presented in this portfolio explore ideas of sustainability, spatial juxtapositions, and phenomenology, while maintaining a strict knowledge of architectural theory. Through each project, I explore different building typologies and pro-grammatic issues while attempting to advance the discipline of architecture in the application of novel forms and often con-fl icting ideas. The work is not entirely modernist, nor is it entirely organic, but rather, the conceptualizations occupy the space between the two movements, and continually investigate attributes of both. Although there are many theoretical camps to develop and adhere to, the work contained herein vacillates between many polarities in an effort to remain fl exible to the infl ux of new ideas.

    WHITE RIVER HERITAGEMUSEUM

    A BATHHOUSE FORTHE OZARKS

    DRURY UNIVERSITYCENTER FOR PERFORM-ING ARTS

    a cultural center for forsyth, missouri

    turkish hammamin a curious

    context facilitating artistic growth and community

    year 2 / semester 2 year 3 / semester 1 year 3 / semester 2

    6 10 14

  • 5EYEBEAM : SGF

    TEMPLE OF BITS :UNDER CONSTRUCTION MISCELLANEOUS WORKSa multi-use

    highrise housinga digital collective

    developing architectural narrative through technological empower-

    ment

    graphic design, branding, prec-edent studies, sketches, etc.

    year 5 / semester 1 year 5 / semester 2

    18 22 26

  • WHITE RIVER HERITAGE MUSUEMA CULTURAL CENTER FOR FORSYTH, MISSOURITEAM: NATHANIEL DEASONARCH211 - BILLY KIMMONS - SP09

    PROBLEMThis project provided a real life application of our architectural studies up to the time. Drurys second year architecture stu-dents were contracted to design a center for the exhibition of artifacts from the White River area in southwestern Missouri. We were given a site and context in Forsyth, Missouri, along with some information concerning the expected inventory.

    CONCEPTI adhered to the clients prerogative to make the visitors discover the natural, historical (Native Americans, Civil War, etc.), and the more contemporary histories of the surrounding area. With this in mind, the development focused on the dichotomy of the more industrialized areas and the more natural, untouched boundaries of the site. I used these boundaries to develop axes as a tool to orient my building and began to investigate a contrast between the two sides of the building.

    The edges of the construction corresponding to the more developed boundaries of the site are much more rigid and planular to refl ect and emphasize the rectilinear nature of the architectural histories. On the other hand, the face of the museum that corresponds to the natural formations of the context emphasize an organic form, in the likeness of an arc and accentuates a more progressive and unrefi ned growth that also houses the main body of the exhibits.

    PROGRAMMATIC REQS.1. Main Gallery2. Subsidiary Gallery3. Support & Offi ces4. Storage5. Classrooms6. Theature7. Reading Louge8. Library9. Gift Shop10. Revolving Gallery

    1

  • 7// LEGEND1. Exterior Rendering2. Site Plan3. Proportion and Circula tion Flow Diagram4. Exterior Rendering

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  • GROUND LEVELClassroomsStoragePark Access

    ENTRY LEVELOffi cesStorageRevolving GalleryGift ShopMain GalleryTheatreRestroomsLounge(s)

    SECOND LEVELOffi cesLibraryReading LoungeConference Space

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  • 9// LEGEND1. Southeast Elevation2. Building Section3. Structural Rendering4. Library Rendering5. Lobby Rendering6. Gallery Rendering7. Gallery Rendering

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  • A tepidarium (warm room): used for washing up with soap and water

    B scaklk (caldarium: hot room): used for soaking up steam and get-ting scrub massages

    C sojukluk (cool room): used to re-lax, dress up, have a refreshing drink and take naps

    OTHER PROGRAMMATIC REQS.1. Reception2. Staff accommodation3. Laundry4. Changing rooms5. Garden / meditation spaces6. Plunging pools

    A

    B

    C

    CONCEPT

    Upholding the typological attributes of sensuality, procedure and transforma-tion, the conceptualization analyzes an amorphous process in which a minimalist object develops themes of maximalism and iconic manipulation of volumes being defi ned by organic forms. PROCESSION The bather would enter the facility, meet-ing very rigid and narrow spaces, revealing a sense of friction or compression that would personify the stressed qualities of the visitor as they begin the bathing pro-cess. As the bather begins to progress through the warming rooms, the rectilinear qualities of the structure and walls begin to warp and peel away, creating larger spaces in plan and in elevation, as they also create lounges and viewing areas. Once the bather emerges from the warming rooms, the surfaces begin to curve outward and overlap over the prior volumes to create a different sense of form as the compression and friction continues to lessen.

    A BATHHOUSE FOR THE OZARKSTURKISH HAMMAM IN A CURIOUS CONTEXTTEAM: NATHANIEL DEASONARCH319 - M.J. NEAL - FA09

    TYPOLOGY

    The turkish hammam is the middle-eastern variant of a steam bath. The bathing process is similar to that of a sauna, but it generally resembles the organization of ancient roman baths. In this sense, it is said the functionality and form of the baths are derived from their conquests into Alexandria, but have in turn adapted to the cultural implications in Turkey, resulting in early baths being added on to mosques and other religious and civil buildings. In many cases, they have evolved into large, dedicated complexes. For the most part, these baths are not exclusive to men: women are segregated by different spaces or by different bathing times. Moreover, each of the spaces in the bath have different functions and varying forms. Typically a hammam is divided into 3 areas:

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  • 11

    // LEGEND1. Spatial Procedure2. Conceptual Floor Plan3. Contextual Site Plan4. Building Site Plan5. Southwest Elevation6. Exterior Rendering

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    6

  • // LEGEND1. Main Floor Plan2. Structural and Formal Diagram3. Detail Wall Section

    1 2

    3

  • 13

    // LEGEND1. Primary Circulation2. Caldarium3. Tepidarium4. Plunging Pools5. Exterior Rendering

    1 2

    3 4

    5

  • DRURY UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR PERFORMING ARTSFACILITATING ARTISTIC GROWTH AND COMMUNITYTEAM: NATHANIEL DEASONARCH320 - JASON HAINLINE - SP1O

    PROBLEMThe interest for this semester was to design a performing arts theatre and educational addition for a series of 4 sites on Drury Universitys campus. This structure would house a 700 seat theatre that would serve both the universitys needs as well as a venue for off-Broadway shows. The educational component would serve all of the performing arts departments as well as a black box t