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WELCOME WE ARE GLAD YOU ARE HERE KNOWLEDGE/RESOURCES/ACTION

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Anoka-Hennepin School District

WELCOMEWe are glad you are hereKNOWLEDGE/RESOURCES/ACTION

AgendaPresenters/SpeakersKTTStudent storyMelissa Adolfson Student storyRose McKinneyQuestion and Answer SessionVisit Resource Tables

KNOWLEDGE/RESOURCES/ACTIONWhats our why?

Our PanelMichael GeorgeCPHS PrincipalStephanie JohnstonStudent Achievement AdvisorChristine AndersonCPHS Social WorkerLindsey SmithRegional Prevention CoordinatorRose McKinneyCPHS Parent/Our Young AddictsKaren ManikowskiHealthy Student Partnership, Project ManagerTracee AndersonKnow The Truth, Community Engagement CoordinatorLaura ZabinskiKnow The Truth, Program ManagerMelissa AdolfsonLead Epidemiologist, MN State Epidemiologist Outcomes WorkgroupPatti CremaCPHS ParentGreg ColePrincipal, Responsible for Discipline Policy in A-H ISD#11Barry ScanlanPrevention CoordinatorChristie Haustein Headway Emotional Health ServicesAndrew DickmanBrooklyn Park Police Juvenile DetectiveSheila DaviesCPHS School Nurse

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Know the truth: Laura zabinskiWhat Students Tell Us

Know the TruthTeenage Substance Abuse in Anoka- Hennepin School District

Know the TruthPersonal approach: Relate, Engage & InformReinforce school curriculum Correct misconceptionsInteractive

Minnesota Adult & Teen ChallengeShort-term treatmentLong-term recovery programIn patient and out patient

Intro Introduction of myselfLogistics folder Agenda Who are you?What do we do?

Agenda for the night7

Schools We Work WithMiddle SchoolsCoon RapidsJackson Oak ViewRoosevelt

High SchoolsCoon Rapids Champlin Park Blaine Andover Anoka

ALCsRegional High SchoolTechnical High School

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Drug TrendsGateway DrugsCigarettes, Alcohol, Marijuana, Prescription Pills

Other Drugs and TrendsMeth, Cocaine, Heroin, Club DrugsBinge Drinking, Inhalants, Over The Counter

Influences Friends, Media, Family

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Middle School Survey Results

2014-2015 Know the Truth Student Survey Statistics Comparing Anoka Hennepin Middle Schools statistics to MN Middle Schools statistics. Through this we can see that there is a lower rate of students drinking in the Anoka Hennepin Middle Schools, compared to the state average. Another thing to take note on this slide, is the frequency of use. Drinking 3+ times a month is to evaluate how often a student drinks throughout the month, and we are seeing it to be uncommon for students to drink on a regular basis here in the Anoka Hennepin Middle Schools. 11

High School Survey Results

2014-2015 Know the Truth Student Survey Statistics Comparing Anoka Hennepin High Schools and Alternative Learning Centers statistics to MN Middle Schools statistics. Through this we can see that there is a higher rate of students drinking in the Anoka Hennepin High Schools, compared to the state average. One thing to note The Alternative Learning Centers often have high use rates, and frequency of use, due to a higher population of students using in these schools. 12

Middle School Survey Results

2014-2015 Know the Truth Student Survey Statistics. 4% of Anoka Hennepin Middle School students have used an illegal drug, in comparison to the state average of 7%.13

Middle School Survey ResultsOf those who have used:

2014-2015 Know the Truth Student Survey Statistics. To make note this slide is to evaluate of those who have used the (4% in Anoka Hennepin Middle Schools and 7% MN Middle Schools) what they have used. OF THOSE WHO HAVE USED, we commonly see a high use rate of Marijuana and Prescription pills. One statistic that is alarming on this chart is the prescription pill use in the Anoka- Hennepin Middle Schools, since this is a preventable thing. 70% of students try prescription pills because they are accessible, if we locked up our medications, or put them ina high traffic area where people can see them, will decrease this statistic. 14

High School Survey Results

2014-2015 Know the Truth Student Survey Statistics. We are seeing a higher use rate in the Anoka- Hennepin High Schools, compared to the state average of MN High Schools. As noted before we commonly see a high use rate in the Alternative Learning Centers. 15

High School Survey ResultsOf those who have used:

2014-2015 Know the Truth Student Survey Statistics. To make note this slide is to evaluate of those who have used the (30% in Anoka Hennepin High Schools, 82% Anoka Hennepin ALCs, and 28% MN Middle Schools) what they have used. OF THOSE WHO HAVE USED, we commonly see a high use rate of Marijuana and Prescription pills. The use of prescription pills can be decreased simply by getting rid of old medicine, locking up medications and putting medicine in a high trafficked area where the medication can be seen. 70% of students try prescription pills because they are accessible.16

School Stats

2014-2015 Know the Truth Student Survey Statistics. Top reasons students choose not to use, is due to potential legal issues, parents disapproval (they care what parents think), and due to the harm that the drugs can cause mentally and physically. 17

School StatsAfter seeing our presentation 94% of students surveyed made a commitment to not use illegal drugs in the future.

After having KTT in their classroom these are the top 2 influences our presentation had on the studentsLearned how dangerous drugs/alcohol can be 71%I learned this could happen to me 68%

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What Can You Do?Educate them and yourselfLock up medicationTalk early and talk oftenPartner with other invested adults

From Here

We challenge you to keep educating yourself on the drugs, alcohol and what is commonly used nowadays. By educating yourself, you will be able to educate your kids and even be ready for when questions arise from your students.

As noted before, the use of prescription pills is at a rise, due to it being easily accessible. This is preventable by locking up medications, getting rid of old medication at a drop-box, or putting medicine in a high trafficked area in the house so you can monitor it.

We challenge you to talk to your kids about drugs and alcohol, not just one time, but many times. We will be discussing tips and ways to approach the discussion in our next session.

Finally we ask that you take this time to partner with other parents and adults who are invested in your children (family, coaches, teachers, mentors). If your child is having a sleepover do not be afraid to call the other parents, to make sure that is where you child is at. Check in with other adults to see how your child is doing, this way if you have any suspicions of use or a tough time you have other adults to fall back on. 19

Student Comments I thought the presentation was amazing at showing, not only the effects of drugs and alcohol, but that help is out there and it really works. Student, Blaine HS

The presentation was quite effective in showing the horrors of drugs and the depths of addiction. Student, Andover HS

Student Comments I thought the presentation was extremely realistic and made me realize that I should not ever turn to drugs or alcohol. Student, Jackson MS

They did a great job telling us the dangers of drugs and alcohol and how badly they can effect our lives, health, and dreams. Student, Blaine HS

Student CommentsVery inspirationalI AM NEVER TRYING DRUGS. - Student

March 3rd PreviewDrug Trends

Contact InfoLaura Zabinski MN Adult & Teen Challenge & Know the TruthPrevention Program Manager612-238-6107 (office)612-804-9482 (cell)[email protected] www.knowthetruthmn.org

DorranceStudent Story

Dorrances StoryAge: 23Fav. Activity (prior to use): SportsFirst Use: 15 - MarijuanaReason: Environmental Influences (Music, TV, Neighborhood, Friends)Worst Consequence: I had a skewed perception of who I was. Greatest Help: MN Adult and Teen ChallengeAdvice: Pay attention to what your children are finding their self-worth in.

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Epidemiologist: Melissa AdolfsonPerception vs. Reality

Minnesota Student Survey FindingsAnoka-Hennepin School District

About the SurveyAdministered every three years84% of public operating school districts participated in 2013From 1995-2010 survey administered to 6th, 9th, and 12th grades; in 2013 administered to 5th, 8th, 9th, and 11th grades

SchoolsSample SizeAnoka High SchoolAndover High SchoolBlaine High SchoolChamplin Park High SchoolCoon Rapids High SchoolRegional High SchoolAnoka-Hennepin Technical High School2,305 5th graders2,578 8th graders2,546 9th graders1,389 11th graders8,818 totalAnoka-Hennepin Participation

Students were asked to report the number of times they used each substance in the 30 days prior to survey administration. Responses for 8th, 9th, and 11th graders were combined; 5th graders were not asked about past-month substance use. Binge drinking refers to drinking five or more alcoholic beverages on one occasion one or more times in the past month. Tobacco use includes students reporting cigarette smoking and/or chewing tobacco use and/or smoking cigars/cigarillos. The question about prescription drugs asks students about using prescription drugs not prescribed to them by their doctor.31

Because of the change in the grade levels surveyed (see slide 29), we can only look at trends for 9th graders. Alcohol and tobacco use has been declining in the Anoka-Hennepin School District, in Minnesota, and nationally among youth. Marijuana use has shown a flattening trend in the state during the past six years, and a slightly increasing trend in some districts.32

PERCEIVED VS. ACTUAL ALCOHOL USE8th Grade9th Grade11th GradeStudents reporting they think MOST students in their school drink alcohol once per month or more often35%64%82%Students reporting they drink alcohol themselves once per month or more often5%9%20%

PERCEIVED VS. ACTUAL MARIJUANA USE8th Grade9th Grade11th GradeStudents reporting they think MOST students in their school use marijuana once per month or more often42%64%83%Students reporting they use marijuana themselves once per month or more often6%8%16%

The previous slides showed data on use of substances in the 30 days prior to the survey administration. Data in this slide come from a set of separate questions that ask about students use in general (with response options ranging from never used to daily use), and questions about perceived peer use. In the Anoka-Hennepin School District and across the state, students over-estimate peer substance use. 33

Students were asked how much they think people risk harming themselves, physically or in other ways, by using substances. Response options of great and moderate risk were combined. Anoka-Hennepin students were most likely to perceived great or moderate risk harm from using prescription drugs not prescribed for them, and from smoking heavily (1+ pack per day). Students were least likely to perceive risk of harm from smoking marijuana once or twice per week. Perceived risk of harm among 9th graders dropped from 2010 to 2013 for binge drinking, marijuana use, and heavy cigarette smoking. The question about risk from prescription drug misuse was first asked in 2013, so trend data are not available.34

Over 9 in 10 Anoka-Hennepin students say their parents would think its wrong or very wrong for them to use, regardless of grade level or substance.

Students were asked how wrong they thought their friends would think it would be for them to use substances, and how wrong their parents would think it would be. Perceived peer disapproval was greatest for prescription drug misuse; students were least likely to think their friends would disapprove of marijuana use. For each substance, perceived peer disapproval declined with grade level. However, over 90% of Anoka-Hennepin students felt their parents would disapprove of substance use regardless of grade level or type of substance. 35

NO useUseAny alcohol usePrescription drug misuse

There is a strong association between substance use and academic achievement. Students reporting no current substance use were considerably more likely to report usually getting A grades as compared to students who did report current substance use. This association held true for all substances. Its important to note that the Minnesota Student Survey data can only be used to show an association. It cannot be used to show the direction of that association (whether its that students with better grades are less likely to choose to use, or that those who use perform more poorly at school).36

Substance use is also strongly associated with truancy. Shown here, Anoka Hennepin students reporting current alcohol use were 4.6 times more likely to report skipping part of a day of school one or more times in the 30 days prior to survey administration as compared to those not using alcohol in the prior 30 days. They were also 3.7 times more likely to report skipping a full day of school one or more times in the prior 30 days.37

Anoka-Hennepin 8th, 9th, and 11th gradersNO current marijuana useCurrent marijuana useDont plan to graduate0.2%1.7%Get my GED1.2%2.2%Work at a job3.3%7.6%Join the military5.6%10.9%Get a license or certificate in a career field5.9%4.8%Attend a two-year college7.1%13.7%Attend a four-year college72.7%52.8%

Students were asked what they planned to do right after graduating from high school. Anoka Hennepin students reporting no past 30 day marijuana use were more likely to say they planned to attend a four year college, as compared to those reporting marijuana use. Those reporting current marijuana use were more likely to say they didnt plan to graduate, or that they planned to get their GED.38

Among current marijuana users, students are less likely to report suicidal ideation if

They can talk to their mother and/or father most or some of the time about problems they are having: 25% vs. 49%They feel teachers and other adults at school care very much or quite a bit about them: 20% vs. 33%

Substance use is strongly associated with suicidal thoughts and attempts; while only data on marijuana is shown here, this association holds true for all substances. Females are more likely than males to report past year suicidal thoughts. Also, students reporting marijuana use are more likely to report suicidal thoughts. However, protective factors like parental communication and caring school staff can buffer the risk of suicidal thoughts. Among those Anoka-Hennepin students reporting current marijuana use (males and females combined), those who can talk to their parents most or some of the time about problems they are having are less likely to report past year suicidal thoughts. Further, feeling that teachers and other adults at school care about them very much or quite a bit buffered the risk of substance use. 39

1.9x more likely to report past year depression; 1.6x morel likely to report past year anxiety1.9x more likely to report past year depression; 1.7x morel likely to report past year anxiety2.2x more likely to report past year depression; 1.9x morel likely to report past year anxiety2.0x more likely to report past year depression; 1.7x morel likely to report past year anxiety1.8x more likely to report past year depression; 1.6x morel likely to report past year anxiety2.5x more likely to report past year depression; 2.3x morel likely to report past year anxiety

Students were asked about past 12 month significant problems with: a) feeling very trapped, lonely, sad, blue, depressed or hopeless about the future (depression), and b) feeling very anxious, nervous, tense, scared, panicked, or like something bad might happen (anxiety). Significant was defined as problems that persist for two or more weeks, keep coming back, keep them from meeting responsibilities, or make them feel like they cant go on. Anoka-Hennepin students reporting current use of alcohol, marijuana, and prescription drugs not prescribed for them were more likely to report depression and anxiety than students not using. The association between marijuana use and mental health was slightly stronger for female students as compared to males; the association between alcohol and prescription drugs and mental health was somewhat stronger among male students.40

ContactMelissa [email protected] Minnesota State Epidemiological Outcomes WorkgroupSubstance Use in [email protected]

County, regional, and state level data on substance use, mental health, and risk and protective factors from the Minnesota Student Survey and numerous other data sources can be found at www.sumn.org. The website is funded by the Minnesota Department of Human Services Alcohol and Drug Abuse Division. 41

JoshStudent Story

Joshs StoryAge: 20First Use: 12 Tobacco, Weed, Alcohol Reason: To fit in Worst Consequence: Criminal Record Greatest Help: My Mentor through MNTC Advice: Be there for your child for emotional support.

Rose McKinneySteps to Take

Next Steps:When Youre Concerned about Substance use

BEEN THERE, DONE THAT 2016 Our Young Addicts. All Rights Reserved.

What Youve Heard TonightNot every kid uses.Not every kid develops an addiction.But, no use is good use - developing brains cannot and should not handle drugs and alcohol.

2016 Our Young Addicts. All Rights Reserved.

Kids that use are not bad kids.Its not about bad parenting.

All Rights Reserved - Our Young Addicts 2016What you need to know

Not my kid

2016 Our Young Addicts. All Rights Reserved.

It starts HERE, TonightGet educated.Ditch the not my kid mentality.Have the talk OFTEN.Say NO to drugs and alcohol for your kids. Zero tolerance.Practice prevention but recognize the signs and symptoms of substance use.

Talk to neighbors, friends, family, teachers, coaches, counselors.Share the situation with others chances are they are familiar and can help.Tap this network the ones on stage.Drug test, if youre unsure.Take care of yourself and other family members.Be prepared for the journey.

All Rights Reserved - Our Young Addicts 2016What to do

Contact me

Rose McKinneyWebsite & Blog: www.OurYoungAddicts.comTwitter @OurYoungAddicts#OYACommunity #SoberSchoolYearEmail [email protected]

All Rights Reserved - Our Young Addicts 2016

Question/Answer

Our PanelMichael GeorgeCPHS PrincipalStephanie JohnstonStudent Achievement AdvisorChristine AndersonCPHS Social WorkerLindsey SmithRegional Prevention CoordinatorRose McKinneyCPHS Parent/Our Young AddictsKaren ManikowskiHealthy Student Partnership, Project ManagerTracee AndersonKnow The Truth, Community Engagement CoordinatorLaura ZabinskiKnow The Truth, Program ManagerMelissa AdolfsonLead Epidemiologist, MN State Epidemiologist Outcomes WorkgroupPatti CremaCPHS ParentGreg ColePrincipal, Responsible for Discipline Policy in A-H ISD#11Christie Haustein Headway Emotional Health ServicesAndrew DickmanBrooklyn Park Police Juvenile Detective

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Our Next SessionsMarch 3rd: Session #2Signs/Symptoms/SupportApril 12th: Session #3Resources, Actions, Community Connections

Please join us in the cafeteria: additional q/a Visit our resource tablesThank you for coming this evening