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  • Youth Leadership- Youth Summits

    and Other Ways to Engage Youth

    November 19, 2015

  • WELCOME

    Reminders:

    • Please mute your device once you join the call

    • Remember to raise your hands for questions or write a message in text box

    • We will give everyone a chance to ask questions at the end of the presentation

  • WELCOME

    Reminders:

    • If you are using more than one device for this

    webinar, please do not place next to each

    other, to reduce echoing or feedback.

    • Make sure your speakers are turned on.

  • THE PURPOSE OF THIS WEBINAR

    Participants will learn about successful

    strategies for the recruitment and

    development of youth leaders.

  • Cynthia “Cindy” Singletary & Taylor Carley

  • Why are Youth Vital to the Self-Advocacy and

    Disability Rights Movement?

    The two most vital laws of disability rights have

    been in law for their whole lives.

    – Youth need to know the history

    – Youth need to know what the steps are to gain more

    rights and to keep from any progress from being lost

  • Why are Youth Vital to the Self-Advocacy and

    Disability Rights Movement?

    The movement needs

    a fresh perspective.

    • “This is how we have always done things.”

    This saying does not make this style the only and best

    way. Things change. Embrace the change.

    • Mentors/”Experienced” advocates can help youth

    navigate through similar difficult experiences.

    The benefits and rights youth with disabilities live with

    are why you went through the hard times. Sharing

    experiences allow both perspectives to grow.

  • Including Youth Takes a Direct Effort

    • If youth are not already part of the program, they

    will need to be shown why they need to devote

    their efforts and time. The question of “What’s in

    it for me?” must be addressed in outreach.

    • Long-term goals are always part of our work, but

    there are short-term benefits that are often taken

    for granted.

  • Youth Outreach Styles

    Partner with Organizations and Programs

    • University Center on Excellence and Developmental Disabilities

    • Centers on Independent Living (CILs)

    • Parent Training Center (PTI)

    • ARC

    • NAACP

    • Vocational Rehabilitation (VR)

    • Department of Human Services (DHS)

    • Schools/Colleges And any others serving youth (not only disability)

  • How Mississippi Has Done It

    STEP UP Council

    • Every UCEDD has a Consumer

    Advisory Council (CAC). We have

    structured IDS’s to have a

    youth/young adult sub-committee.

    • The sub-committee has elected

    officers including two co-chairs.

    The Co-Chairs represent the sub-

    committee as full members of the

    CAC. STEP UP has a focus of

    service and fun to keep the youth

    actively involved.

  • How Mississippi Has Done It

    TRIAD AmeriCorps

    The UCEDD has had an

    AmeriCorps volunteer service

    program that has been geared

    to young adults inclusively

    providing a rare opportunity.

    This program has led to future

    jobs and education after their

    service terms.

  • How Mississippi Has Done It

    AdvocacyTEAM

    • Following the 2011 Regional Summits of AIDD, we decided to reinstate the state team of self-advocates with more self- advocates from throughout the state representing multiple disabilities, cultures and ages.

    • Youth and young adults were a part of this mixture. The Team determined further guidelines including there will be Co-Chairs. One will be an “experienced” advocate. The other will be a youth/young adult. They will both be elected by the Team.

    IMAGE:

    ATEAMM Logo

  • How Mississippi Has Done It

    Youth Summits & Trainings

    • Regional trainings focused on transition needs. Requires partnership with schools… Additional agency & organization partnerships encouraged.

    • Multi-faceted… • Remember learning styles vary

    • Young adults & “experienced” advocates lead.

    • End with engaging to the other opportunities.

    IMAGE:

    ATEAMM Logo

  • Youth Advocacy Summit

  • Thank You!!!

    • Cynthia “Cindy” Singletary

    – cynthia.singletary@gmail.com

    • Taylor Carley

    – robert.carley@usm.edu

    mailto:Cynthia.singletary@gmail.com mailto:Robert.carley@usm.edu

  • OCSS STATES QUESTIONS

    AND ANSWERS

  • STATE QUESTIONS

    1. What have you done to engage youth in your

    state?

  • THANK YOU!

    Regional Self Advocacy Technical Assistance Center Funded by the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

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