Writing Goals for English Language Learners

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Ellevation webinar focused on helping ESL / ELL educators author goals for English Language Learners. Key topics include crafting SMART goals aligned to language proficiency standards, supporting access to the content of the Common Core, and using technology to track student progress against key language objectives.

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<ul><li> 1. Welcome! Well begin in just a few minutes.Everyone is muted upon arrival.If you have questions, use the chat box on the right.We will be sharing the slides and recording after the event.Indispensable Tools for Todays ELL Professionals Writing Goals for English Learners Jordan Meranus: Ellevation CEO Allison Balter: EL Teacher, Lawrence MA</li></ul> <p> 2. AGENDAI.IntroductionII. Context III. Goals: Definition, Criteria IV. Creating Goals: Where to StartV. Creating Goals: 3 Case Studies VI. Monitoring Goals VII. Ellevation Platform Description2 3. ELLEVATION Ellevation is a software company exclusively dedicated to serving English Language Learners and the educators that work with them. 4. THE ELLEVATION PLATFORMInstruction Individualized Learning Plans aligned to state, Common Core, and WIDA standards Student/school/district analysis of ELP assessmentsProductivity ELL Data Collection and Demographics Required letters to families in 25+ languagesCollaboration Collaborative goal setting and progress monitoring Communication tools for ELL and classroom teachers 5. NATIONAL REACH 190 School Districts: 26 States5 6. TODAYS OBJECTIVEHelp all participants gain practical tips for writing goals for individual English Language Learners or groups of ELs at a similar level, and ideas on how to monitor student goals.6 7. OPENING EXERCISEOf the three goals below, which would you rate as the highest quality and most applicable for use by a teacher? 1. Student will grow from a Level 1.9 in speaking to a Level 3.9 in speaking by the end of the school year. 2. Student will write a well-organized paragraph with a clear main idea and supporting details by the end of Unit 3. 3. Student will increase his/her reading fluency to a rate of 85 words per minute.7 8. AGENDAI.IntroductionII. Context III. Goals: Definition, Criteria IV. Creating Goals: Where to StartV. Creating Goals: 3 Case Studies VI. Monitoring Goals VII. Ellevation Platform Description8 9. I. CONTEXTRTIStudent Learning ObjectivesLIEPSet and Track GoalsPersonalized Learning9 10. II. WHY ARE GOALS IMPORTANTPlanningSetting goals helps teacher make sure lessons are targeted and strategic.DifferentiationHelps make sure teachers provide necessary scaffolds/supports based on individual needs.Student MotivationTransparency with students, and enabling them to set and track progress, is empowering!10 11. AGENDAI.IntroductionII. Context III. Goals: Definition, Criteria IV. Creating Goals: Where to StartV. Creating Goals: 3 Case Studies VI. Monitoring Goals VII. Ellevation Platform Description11 12. III. WHAT ARE GOALSDefinition: Statement of an Intended Outcome of Work Criteria: We are going to use the SMART framework as criteria for evaluating goals.SpecificMeasurableAttainableRelevantTime-bound12 13. III. SMART FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS CriteriaDescription for ELLstarget a specific area for improvementfocused on a single language domain, very concrete skillquantify or at least suggest an indicator of progresstools exist, such as a rubric, to measure student progressrealistic and aligned to appropriate standardsaligned with language development standards and proficiency levelsRelevantgoals matter and are appropriate for this time and placerelevant to what students need to be successful in content classes and move to next level of proficiencyTime-boundspecify when the result(s) can be achievedspecific to individual or groups of studentsSpecificMeasurable Attainable (Aligned)13 14. OPENING EXERCISEOf the three goals below, which would you rate as the highest quality and most applicable for use by a teacher? 1. Student will grow from a Level 1.9 in speaking to a Level 3.9 in speaking by the end of the school year.2. Student will write a well-organized paragraph with a clear main idea and supporting details by the end of Unit 3. 3. Student will increase his/her reading fluency to a rate of 85words per minute.14 15. AGENDAI.IntroductionII. Context III. Goals: Definition, Criteria IV. Creating Goals: Where to StartV. Creating Goals: 3 Case Studies VI. Monitoring Goals VII. Ellevation Platform Description15 16. IV. CREATING GOALS: HOW DO I START?Baseline &amp; Target VerbAt what level are my students.Work AchievementWhat will the student do.What will I observe? In the context of content.Timeframe By when?16 17. IV. CREATING GOALS: HOW DO I START?Baseline and Target 1.Use assessment data to determine where a student is currently performing across domains2.For newcomer/beginner 2 ELD levels in one year3.For intermediate or higher 1 ELD level in one year4.Each student needs an annual goal for each domain.5.From there we can chunk up goals into smaller sub goals. 18. IV. BASELINE AND TARGETAcademic Language Demands L5L4 L3 L2 L1Linguistic ComplexityVocabulary UsageLanguage Forms 19. IV. CREATING GOALS: HOW DO I START?Verb 1. Goals are action oriented. 2. Focused on language skills and functions. 3. Examples: Increase Critique Compare and contrast 4. Sources of verbs that are appropriate for goals Blooms Taxonomy Can Do Descriptors 20. IV. HELPFUL TOOL: BLOOMS TAXONOMY 21. IV. HELPFUL TOOL: WIDA CAN DO DESCRIPTORS 22. IV. CREATING GOALS: HOW DO I START?Work Achievement 1. Specific to language domains Speaking; Listening; Reading; Writing 2. Related to what students must do in grade levelcontent classes 3. Examples Writing assignment Oral classroom debate Annotating in the margin of the text 23. IV. CREATING GOALS: HOW DO I START?Timeframe 1. Long-term goals Year-long (2 level growth for beginners; 1 level growth for intermediates and above) 2. Short-term goals Unit-specific Quarter or semester specific 24. AGENDAI.IntroductionII. Context III. Goals: Definition, Criteria IV. Creating Goals: Where to StartV. Creating Goals: 3 Case Studies VI. Monitoring Goals VII. Ellevation Platform Description24 25. V. CREATING GOALS: 3 CASE STUDIESCase Study 1 ESL Class: 12 StudentsCase Study 2 Content Class; Multiple Levels; 22 StudentsCase Study 3 Individual Student25 26. V. CASE STUDY 1: ESL CLASSBaseline &amp; Target 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0At what level are my students. ESL Class: Beginners 12 Students 7 are Level 1 5 are Level 2 Single Domain Focus: Writing1234Student Levels: Writing5Goal: 2 Levels of Growth Level 1 Level 3 Level 2 Level 426 27. V. CASE STUDY 1: CONSTRUCTING THE GOALSVerbWork AchievementTimeframeFor Current Level 1 StudentsStudent will compare and contrast two characters from a story, in two well organized paragraphs that include at least three similarities and three differences, by the end of the unit in December. Verb Student will explain steps Student will give opinionsWork Achievement For arriving at a solution through a letter on27 28. V. CASE STUDY 1: CONSTRUCTING THE GOALSVerbWork AchievementTimeframeFor Current Level 2 StudentsStudent will compare and contrast two characters from a story, in two well organized paragraphs that include at least three similarities and three differences using transition words to connect ideas, by the end of the unit in December.28 29. V. CASE STUDY 1: SMART CRITERIACriteria SpecificMeasurable Attainable (Aligned) RelevantTime-boundFor ELLs Focused on a single language domain: WritingCriteria exists to evaluate well written paragraphs.Work product is realistic and aligned to appropriate standards.Applicable to the work of the class.Teacher has specified by the end of December.29 30. V. CASE STUDY 2: CONTENT CLASSBaseline &amp; Target 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0At what level are my students. Content Class: 22 Students Single Domain Focus: Speaking12 3 4 5 6 Student Levels: SpeakingGoal: 1 or 2 Levels of Growth Level 2 Level 4 Levels 3, 4, and 5: 1 level growth Level 6: Maintain high expectations30 31. V. CASE STUDY 2: CONSTRUCTING THE GOALSVerbWork AchievementTimeframeFor Current Level 2 Students Students will present and defend a point of view in a debate scenario, giving multiple reasons for their position, by the end of the unit in February. For Current Levels 3-6 Students Students will present and defend a point of view in a debate scenario, giving multiple reasons for their position and citing clear evidence from different sources by the end of the unit in February.31 32. V. CASE STUDY 1: SMART CRITERIACriteria SpecificMeasurable Attainable (Aligned) RelevantTime-boundFor ELLs Focused on a single language domain: Speaking Teachers can track whether students articulate multiple reasons. Work product is realistic and aligned to appropriate standards.Applicable to the work of the class.Teacher has specified by the end of the unit in February.32 33. V. CASE STUDY 3: INDIVIDUAL STUDENTBaseline &amp; TargetAt what level are my students.Focus on Reading and Writing as areas of growth33 34. V. CASE STUDY 3: CONSTRUCTING THE GOALSVer Work Achievement Timeframe b Student will use a variety of strategies to analyze and interpret text by the end of the 2013-14 school year, as evidenced by annotations in text, performance on classroom assessments, and standardized assessments.Student will identify unknown words in a text and use context clues to infer their meaning.Student will make predictions about a text based on text features, such as titles, pictures, captio ns, subheadings, and bold words.Student will identify main ideas and label key supporting details.34 35. V. CASE STUDY 1: SMART CRITERIACriteria SpecificMeasurable Attainable (Aligned) RelevantTime-boundFor ELLs Focused on a single language domain: Reading Using both assessments and observations, teacher can measure progress. Work product is realistic and aligned to appropriate standards.Applicable to the work of the class. Teacher has specified by the end of year for the broader goal, and then has chunked up the goal and can set timeframes for each.35 36. AGENDAI.IntroductionII. Context III. Goals: Definition, Criteria IV. Creating Goals: Where to StartV. Creating Goals: 3 Case Studies VI. Monitoring Goals VII. Ellevation Platform Description36 37. VI. MEASURING PROGRESSEvaluating progress is difficult; different tools and approaches are needed Speaking and writing are easier with rubrics a. b. c. d.Formative and summative assessments Organic progress monitoring; note taking WIDA Writing Rubric WIDA Speaking RubricReading and listening are more difficult; no production a. b.Formative and summative assessments Organic progress monitoring; note taking 38. VI. MEASURING PROGRESS Provide students constant and ongoing visibility into their own progress 39. VI. MEASURING PROGRESS Provide students constant and ongoing visibility into their own progress 40. VI. MEASURING PROGRESS 41. VI. MEASURING PROGRESS 42. VI. MEASURING PROGRESS 43. AGENDAI.IntroductionII. Context III. Goals: Definition, Criteria IV. Creating Goals: Where to StartV. Creating Goals: 3 Case Studies VI. Monitoring Goals VII. Ellevation Platform Description43</p>