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World Cultures. Unit 5: Cultures in Conflict. Exploring Knowledge: Writing Prompts. By yourself, write down your own answer to the following questions: • What is an example of two cultures colliding? • Can cultures collide in a good way? Give examples. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Military History

World CulturesUnit 5: Cultures in ConflictExploring Knowledge: Writing PromptsBy yourself, write down your own answer to the following questions:

What is an example of two cultures colliding?

Can cultures collide in a good way? Give examples.

With your partner discuss your answers.

In Embedded Assessment 2, students will consider the extent that your culture informs your view of the world; therefore, it is important to contextualize PicoIyers text. Begin by introducing the title and asking students the following questions: What is an example of two cultures colliding? Can cultures collide in a good way? Give examples.2Word Map: Juxtaposition Juxtaposition Definition: Act of placing 2 or more items side-by-side or near each other. Remind students that juxtaposition is an academic vocabulary word. Tell them to create a word map for juxtapositionand add it to your Vocabulary Notebooks.3About the Author: Pico Iyer

Pico Iyer (born 1957) is a British-born essayist and novelist. He is the author of numerous books on crossing cultures including Video Night in Kathmandu, The Lady and the Monk and The Global Soul. An essayist for Time since 1986, he also publishes regularly in Harper's, The New York Review of Books, The New York Times, and many other publications.

Begin by reading aloud thepassage. While you read, askstudents to mark the text forimages that help them imagine thescene. You can stop after each chunk(each paragraph) and ask studentsto highlight words or make marginalnotes about images.4 After reading, invite studentsto sketch images from the text.Remind them that You will not beassessed on your ability to draw buton your ability to produce a drawingthat reflects your knowledge ofthe text.5 When students are donesketching, have them quickly scanthe text for specific words, phrases,or sentences that correspond toyour pictures. Instruct them to writethe words next to or below your drawings.4Shared Reading: Where Worlds Collide

You will begin this activity by reading from Pico Iyers essay Where Worlds Collide. In this piece, Iyer describes what people experience as they arrive at Los Angeles international airport (LAX). While you are reading, mark the text by highlighting or underlining images that create a picture of the scene. Think about how Iyer uses juxtaposition in his description of unlike images. You may want to record these words and or phrases in the margins of the pages.Begin by reading aloud thepassage. While you read, askstudents to mark the text forimages that help them imagine thescene. You can stop after each chunk(each paragraph) and ask studentsto highlight words or make marginalnotes about images.4 After reading, invite studentsto sketch images from the text.Remind them that You will not beassessed on your ability to draw buton your ability to produce a drawingthat reflects your knowledge ofthe text.5 When students are donesketching, have them quickly scanthe text for specific words, phrases,or sentences that correspond toyour pictures. Instruct them to writethe words next to or below your drawings.5Shared Reading: Where Worlds Collide

Chunk the text: stop at the end of each paragraph. After reading each chunk, sketch images from the text. When you are done sketching, quickly scan the text for specific words, phrases, or sentences that correspond to your pictures and write them next to or below the drawing.

46Developing Knowledge: Where Worlds CollideIn your small groups, share your drawings with your partners and respond to the following questions:

How are your pictures similar or different?

What words would you use to describe the atmosphere in the essay?

What is Iyers (implied) opinion about Los Angeles International Airport as a junction for colliding worlds?

In small groups (34), have students share your drawings with your classmates and respond to the following questions: How are your pictures similar or different? What words would you use to describe the atmosphere in the essay? What is Iyers (implied) opinion about Los Angeles International Airport as a junction for colliding worlds?7Developing Knowledge: Where Worlds Collide

Who are the You that Iyer refers to in the opening line?

How does point of view affect meaning?

This essay is told from the third-person point of view. How would it be different if told from another point of view or perspective?

After students have discussed the essay, have them report out your findings to the class. Lead a class discussion using these questions: Who are the You that Iyer refers to in the opening line? How does point of view affect meaning? This essay is told from the third-personpoint of view. How would it be different if told from another point of view or perspective? Iyer uses juxtaposition (the arrangement of two or more things for the purpose of comparison) in his presentation of unlike images. Why? How do travelers expectations match the reality You see when You arrive? To what extent does ones cultural makeup determine the way a person views others and the world? A text can contain more than one theme. What universal ideas about life and society does the author convey in this essay? What stylistic techniques does Iyer use to convey theme (tone, diction, point of view, organizational structure, etc.)? Is the themeexplicit or implicit? Explain.8Developing Knowledge: Where Worlds Collide

To what extent does ones cultural makeup determine the way a person views others and the world?

A text can contain more than one theme. What universal ideas about life and society does the author convey in this essay?

To what extent does ones cultural makeup determine the way a person views others and the world? A text can contain more than one theme. What universal ideas about life and society does the author convey in this essay? What stylistic techniques does Iyer use to convey theme (tone, diction, point of view, organizational structure, etc.)? Is the themeexplicit or implicit? Explain.9Reflection: Where Worlds Collide

By yourself, imagine yourself in the role of a traveler getting off of the plane at LAX (Los Angeles). Consider how your own experiences would affect your perception. What would you think about what you saw? How would you feel? Provide specific examples from the reading to illustrate your points.

Or think about an experience in which you were put into a culturally foreign situation. In what way(s) was the experience similar to or different from the disorienting experience described in Where Worlds Collide"? How were your perceptions changed as a result of the experience? Provide specific examples from the reading to illustrate your points.

For a reflective exercise, you may want students to imagine yourself in the role of a traveler getting off of the plane at LAX (LosAngeles). Tell students to consider how your own experiences would affect your perception. What would You think about what You saw?How would You feel? Or suggest the following: Tell students to think about an experience in which You were put into a culturally foreignsituation. In what way(s) was the experience similar to or different from the disorienting experience described in Where WorldsCollide"? How were students perceptions changed as a result of the experience? Ask students to write a brief script with an explicitor implicit theme about being in a culturally foreign situation. The script should convey a definite mood or tone. 10

Voices of Modern Culture

Essential Question: What are some ways films depict elements of culture?

Making Connections: Film and TextMaking Connections: Film and Text (Writing)SB V U2 L6 Theatrical and Cultural Elements in FilmAgenda

Purpose: To analyze filmmakers use of theatrical elements, such as costumes, props, and sets, for particular effects To identify common cultural elements that characterize cultural identity To analyze and compare personal, social, cultural, and historical perspectives

11One has only to listen to the cheers of an African audience as Hollywoods heroes slaughter red Indians or Asiatics to understand the effectiveness of this weapon. For, in the developing continents, where the colonialist heritage has left a vast majority still illiterate, even the smallest child gets the message contained in the blood and thunder stories emanating from California.

Kwame Nkrumah 1965Title of film_______________________________Name of characters_________________________

Costumes/Makeup

Props/Sets

Acting Choices

Cultural Elements

Making Connections: Film and Text1. Take time to review the connection between analyzing a written text and analyzing film. Students should understand that film and art are essentially visual texts. As with a written text, students can analyze, justify, and critique the director or artists choices.2 Select one or two of the clips from films identified below or others containing theatrical elements that create a distinct cultural context. As you show these visual prompts, ask students to respond to each by noting the costumes, props, sets, and acting choices (Acting can includemovement, gestures, voices, and so forth). Students should take notes in the graphic organizers on the student page.13The media can change lots of things including:

How people see the world

How people see their prospects

How people understand their roles in society What is just and fair what is not.

How people view politicians and parties and who to vote for

Peoples desires or what their desires should be/ aspirations(Homework:: Watch How TV ruined your life ep3 aspiration)

What a proper life is and what a weird life is.