What You Need To Know To Be A Better Recruiter1

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1. What You Need to Know to be a Better Recruiter 2. What do you think when you hear the word ACT? -College admissions test - Perfect score is 36 Scholarship test Oh God, that test! 3. Importance of Score Sender Data 4. Score Senders Are Simply not Like any Other Inquiry Among 2007 ACT-tested high school graduates: 62.8 tested at least once as 11 thgraders 30.8% enrolled at a college that was at least in one of their score-sender choice sets* Among students who tested as 11 thgraders, specified at least one college choice, and enrolled somewhere: 57.2% enrolled at a college that was in at least one of their 11 thgrade choice sets *includes students who sent no scores and/or enrolled at no institution that we could track. 5. Importance of Score-Senders Score-senders will typically be the highest-yielding initial source code (aside from applications) in your inquiry pool Even 3-5 thchoice students will enroll at rates above most other initial source codes in your inquiry pool 6. Official vs. Unofficial Scores Students sending official score reports are more likely to enroll than ACT-tested students who do not send official scores 7. Understanding the Score Report 8. Understanding the Score Report Over 300 points of data on each student Cognitive Data Non-Cognitive Data 9. Cognitive Data 10. Understanding the data you receive: Cognitive Data The ACT is a curriculum-based assessment Tests students in core subject areas of English, mathematicsreading and science Assesses student proficiencies in these subject areas Informs and affects more than recruitment strategies 11. More than just a score! ACT National Curriculum Survey ACT College Readiness Standards Understanding the data you receive: Cognitive Data 12. ACT National Curriculum Survey Survey middle, high school and postsecondary educators Determine faculty expectations in English, math, reading and science then compare these to actual teaching and rigor practices as they tie to college readiness Survey is basis and foundation for EPAS Tests and promotes college readiness Standards are not opinions, but facts based onsurvey and research Understanding the data you receive: Cognitive Data 13. ACT College Readiness Standards Narrative description of what students need to know and be able to do Reflect a common continuum of achievement Progressive model of student progressfrom middle to high school Reflect student strengths/weaknesses evaluate student readiness for next levels of learning Understanding the data you receive: Cognitive Data 14. Understanding the data you receive: Cognitive Data 15. Without improving the quality and content of the core, it appears that most students need to take additional higher-level courses to learn what they should have learned from a rigorous core curriculum, with no guarantee even then that they will be prepared for college-level work. ACT research suggests that students today do not have a reasonable chance of becoming ready for college unless they take additional higher-level courses beyond the minimum core, and even then they are not always likely to be ready for college. This finding is in part a reflection on the quality and intensitytherigor of the high school curriculum.ACT Minimum CoreEnglish:4 yearsSocial Studies:At least 3 years Mathematics:At least 3 years Natural Sciences:At least 3 years Understanding the data you receive: Cognitive Data 16. Understanding the data you receive: Cognitive Data 17. Readiness Benchmark Scores Through collaborative research with postsecondary institutions nationwide, ACT has established the following College Readiness Benchmark Scores: A benchmark score is the minimum score needed on an ACTsubject area test to indicate a 50% chance of obtaining a B orhigher or about a 75% chance of obtaining a C or higher in the corresponding credit-bearing college courses. College Readiness Benchmark ScoreEnglish English Composition 18MathAlgebra22Reading Social Sciences 21Science Biology 24 ACT Subject Area Test College Course(s) 18. Understanding the data you receive: Cognitive Data 19. Understanding the data you receive: Cognitive Data 20. Understanding the data you receive: Cognitive Data 21. Understanding the data you receive: Cognitive Data 22. Understanding the data you receive: Cognitive Data 23. Understanding the data you receive: Cognitive Data 24. Understanding the data you receive: Cognitive Data 25. Non-Cognitive 26. Non-Cognitive: Score Report Information Major/degree interests Type of institution/interests Extracurricular activitiesIn HS and for postsecondary School choice/size Needs (academic and otherwise) 27. Integrating Data Into Your Recruitment Strategy 28. Integrating Data Into Your Recruitment Strategy Integrating Cognitive Data Understanding Skills vs. Scores improves communication with students Personalizes communications regarding academic needs/strengths More informed application review process Become a resource to HS College/Guidance Counselors 29. Integrating Non-Cognitive Data Personalized communication which each student Promote institutional student support services geared toward student needs/interests/plans Begin effective communication as early as first ACT Official Score Report Impacts Prospect to Applicant to Enrollee yield Increase value of high school visits, phone calls, email Integrating Data Into Your Recruitment Strategy 30. Time of First Time Testing 31. Time of First Time Testing When a student takes their first ACT has an impact on college access and enrollment The later a student takes their first test, the less access they have to the college admissions pipeline First time test taking impacts all demographics, but has a greater impact on minorities 32. First-Time Testing Nationally 60% of African-American and Hispanic students take their first ACT as Seniors Late testing limits access to postsecondary institutions Schools are looking at yield and not building prospect pool during student senior year In IL, CO, MI, KY, TN, WY 100% of students take ACT in Spring of Junior year 33. Importance of Name Release for ACT Testers 34. Releasing Names for Postsecondary Access Entering the pipeline requires that students release their names and contact information for access by colleges/universities Not releasing names limits access to important information for entry to postsecondary education Students, parents and high school college/guidance counselors need to know! 35. College Choice Set and You 36. College Choice Set and You As part of the Student Questionnaire (via ACT registration), students: Will identify colleges and universities Show interest level for each institution 1 st , 2 nd , 3 rd , etc Up to four score reports/institutions at no additional cost 37. College Choice Set and YouCollege choice is the single most important predictor of enrollment Likelihood of enrollment by college choice is affected by ACT Composite Score, race/ethnicity, and enrollment preferences 38. Score Report Information 39. Score Report Information Use information to personalize communication.students: Want to see themselves on your campus Are interested in being a part of the whole Insist on the fact that schools provide them with needed support Are attracted to personalized communication 40. Most Important Factors for Effective Recruitment 41. More in-depth knowledge of skills not just scores College Readiness Standards/Benchmarks Steer admissions decision, communication, students services based on cognitive understanding Effective personalized communication using non-cognitive data Connect institutional services with students interests and needs Most Important Factors for Effective Recruitment 42. Promoting early testing (Junior year) increases access for students and institutions to vital information/data Students and Counselors need to understand importance of releasing namesUse choice set to prioritize communications with students Data-based communication and overall recruitment strategies help you more effectively achieve and exceed your enrollment goals Most Important Factors for Effective Recruitment

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