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  • WHAT IS EXCEL, AND WHY DO WE USE IT?

    Excel is a spreadsheet program that allows you to

    store, organize, and analyze information

    Descriptives: For continuous variables, displays mean, median, mode,

    minimum/maximum, and range.

    Frequencies: For categorical variables, displays percentages, distributions,

    Skewness

    Tables/Graphs

    Storing, Sorting, Recoding, Manipulating, Cleaning Data

    Calculations & Formulas

  • EXCEL BASICS: ROWS, COLUMNS, AND CELLS

    Rows: each numbered

    along the left side of

    the spreadsheet

    Columns: labeled with letters along the top part of

    the spreadsheet.Cells: each cell is

    represented by a

    rectangular box. Currently

    only cell A1 is selected.

    Multiple cells can be

    selected by clicking and

    dragging the selected

    cell.

  • EXCEL BASICS: SUMS AND AVERAGES

    We will use the following hypothetical sample of Oxy students and calculate the total money

    earned on campus, and the average GPA.

  • EXCEL BASICS: SUMS AND AVERAGES

    To find the sum, start by typing =sum below the column of numbers you want to

    add together. Next, select the range of numbers you want the sum of (blue

    rectangular box)

  • EXCEL BASICS: SUMS AND AVERAGES To find the average GPA, type =average and again select the numbers you want to

    average with the blue rectangular box

  • EXCEL BASICS: MINIMUM AND MAXIMUM

    To find the minimum or maximum in a set of numbers, repeat the same process

    except type =min or =max

  • EXCEL BASICS: QUARTILES

    When calculating quartiles for a range of number, you can choose

    exactly which quartile you want displayed, notated by a 1, 2, or 3.

    Note that after you select your range of number, you must use a

    comma followed by a space then a number.

  • EXCEL BASICS: SORTING

    Excels ability to sort is invaluable when you need to

    focus on particular areas and organize your data.

    In our example, we will sort by sex, then by GPA

    The first step to sorting your data is selecting your

    entire dataset, then clicking DataSort

  • EXCEL BASICS: SORTING

    In the pop-up window, you will then be presented with your sorting

    options. Click Add Level to add another layer of sorting. Note that the

    order can also be changed.

  • EXCEL BASICS: SORTING

    These data are sorted by sex first, then ascending GPA

  • EXCEL BASICS: CONCATENATE

    The concatenate function in Excel is useful because it allows you to combine two columns.

    For example, we will combine the first name and last name columns

    The new column will display names as last name, first name

    The first step is to create a new column, which can be done by right-clicking the column letter

    Insert

  • EXCEL BASICS: CONCATENATE

    In the new column, type

    =concatenate then select the two

    cells that you want to combine

    In this example, a comma between

    the two names is created by typing

    (D2,, ,C2)

    Double-click the bottom right

    corner of the cell to fill the formula

    down through the column

  • Text to Columns is the opposite of concatenate it splits data

    apart, either at a fixed point in the data, or based on a

    delimiter (space, comma, etc.)

    Go to Data>Text to Columns

    TEXT TO COLUMNS

    Note: you typically

    want to select

    delimited. Any

    words separated by

    commas or spaces

    fall under this

    category.

  • TEXT TO COLUMNS In this case, the names were

    separated by a

    comma.

    Now, the last names

    and first names

    appear in two

    different columns

  • CREATING AND INTERPRETING PIVOTTABLES

    PivotTables are one of Excels most powerful functions.

    Allow you to pick and choose the variables you want to compare.

    Make meaningful interpretations from your data.

    To make your PivotTable, select your data then click insertPivotTable

    Create a unique identifier for each case, if not already present (such as

    A# or PIDM)

    Insert>New Column>UniqueID>Autofill with increasing numbers

    This will be your count variable

  • CREATING AND INTERPRETING PIVOTTABLES

    PivotTable Field List will then pop up on the right side of the screen. Your

    different variables will be displayed, which you can drag into the different boxes

    below. In this example, sex and race are the column and row labels, while the

    values displayed are the count of each gender for every race.

  • CREATING AND INTERPRETING PIVOT TABLES

    Column Percent

    Row Percent

    To find your column percent, right-click one of

    your values and select show values as% of

    column total

    These numbers tell you what percent of each

    gender are Asian, Black, Latino, etc.

    For example, you can conclude that 28.57% of

    females are Asian

    To find your row percent, right-click one of your values

    and select show values as% of row total

    These numbers tell you what percent of each race are

    male or female

    For example, you can conclude that 40% of Asians are

    female

    Note: Row and Column percent are

    only used with categorical variables

  • FORMATTING NUMBERS IN PIVOTTABLES

    To format numbers in PivotTables, right-click on one of your numbers, then

    go to number format.

    On the pop-up menu, you can select the number of decimal places you want

    displayed which will apply to every number in your PivotTable.

    Right-click

  • CREATING A PIVOTCHART FROM A PIVOTTABLE

    The first step to creating a PivotChart is dragging

    the desired variables into the appropriate areas on

    the PivotTable Field list. Once your PivotTable

    appears, click on it, then go to Insert and select

    your desired chart type. In this case, we will use a

    2D bar chart.

  • CREATING A PIVOTCHART FROM A PIVOTTABLE

    Once your PivotChart appears, you can add features to make your chart

    more complete. On the Layout tab, you can add a Chart Title, Data Labels

    and Axis Titles. On the Design tab, you can click different chart layouts to

    change the feel of your PivotChart.

  • CREATING A PIVOTCHART FROM A PIVOTABLE

    By dragging variables into the report filter, you can select the exact

    variables you want to be displayed on the graph.

  • CREATING A VLOOKUP FUNCTION

    Vlookup can retrieve data from other tables and

    display it on your table of interest.

    The data in Tabl2 is on an independent

    spreadsheet

    Vlookup will allow us to display whether or not a

    student is a 1st gen on our primary table

    Note: make sure to

    name your

    secondary table.

    This makes it easier

    to create the vlookup

    syntax

    Table name

  • CREATING A VLOOKUP FUNCTION

    To create your vlookup function, start by typing =vlookup( followed by the

    cell you want to lookup (must be in the leftmost column), then the table of

    interest (Tabl2), then the column number that contains the information you

    want displayed, followed by False

    Note: the column

    letter corresponds

    with the column

    number. For

    example, column

    B is 2

  • PRINT AREA

    To set your print area, select the data you want printed,

    then go to Page LayoutPrint AreaSet Print Area

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