week 5 virtual environments

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  • MODULE 2: DESIGN

    LIM BINXIU ANGELINE596462

    VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS

  • COMPOSITION STRATEGY

    Based on last week's work, the three main themes of my design is rotate, growth and overlap. I intend to use rotation in the form of twisting effects to achieve a slight variation in the form. Growth can be exhibited through through a gradual increase in the size of the elements. The overlapping will be explored in the panelling section in terms of shadows. I did some sketches to explore the forms that I can mould using plasticine.

    COMPOSITION STRATEGY: There should be an origin point with a spread out and flowy effect (can be achieved through curves)...

    Development of form using plasticine

    Sketches to explore composition

  • DESIGN PROCESS: EXPLORATION WITH PLASTICINE MODELS AND TRANSLATING INTO RHINO

    I started with the design on the left. It is actually a literal translation of the plasticine models I made in Module 1 and there is too much detailing to be transferred into Rhino.

    Hence, I came up with another model on the right. I took the largest unit from my first model and rotated and scaled the elements. I tried to model the design on the right using Rhino by creating three different sections and attempting to connect them using the Boolean union tool. However, I realised that this process is too complicated because the cross-sectional areas of each individual piece is different and the angles of rotation have to be very precise. Reviewing my designs, I realised that there were multiple forms involved which is difficult to create. Hence, I decided to simplify my design to just focusing on one form.

    Literal translation of form

    Rotation and scaling

    Attempts in using Boolean Union tool

  • DESIGN PROCESS: EXPLORATION WITH PLASTICINE MODELS AND TRANSLATING INTO RHINO

    Extracting a single element from my previous design, I began modelling it. Eventually, I obtained a tubular design, widening at both ends. Although I managed to successfully model it in Rhino, I felt that it did not portray growth because there is just a thick volume and it is too stable.

    Extracting a single element

    Tubular model Tracing profile curves

  • DESIGN PROCESS: FINALISING DESIGN This is my final design. It starts from a small point and twines around the arm, growing outwards. It is adapted from my emerging forms in Module 1. The 'tail' of my design is inspired by the branching out effect while the main 'body' is inspired by the increasing size of elements, forming the volume. I like how my emerging forms blend together to portray the growth.

    Final design

    Emerging form that inspires the 'body' of my design

    Emerging form that inspires the 'tail' of my design

  • DESIGN PROCESS: DIGITISING FINAL DESIGN IN RHINOI tried to digitise my final design using the method of cutting cross-sections, however, I could not loft it due to the twist in the design. Furthermore, it does not pass through a single point so it could not be pierced through a skewer. I then applied the first method of tracing profile curves of the bean shaped from the top and front photographs. For the tail of the design, I used the pipe command and did a Boolean union of the two.

    FInal model

    Cutting cross sections

    Front view Top view

    Boolean union of pipe and bean shaped obtained from tracing profile curves

  • DESIGN PROCESS: IMPROVING THE GEOMETRY IN RHINO

    As I did a Boolean union of two forms, there was an irregular and bumpy connection between the them. This posed a lot of problems in terms of paneling because the faces would either overlap or the mesh would be inverted. After attending the tech support, the tutor recommended me to do a section curves of the entire form and loft them to form a single surface. The irregular connection was smoothen out and adjusted using control point edit on the curves.

    Problems of using Boolean union for paneling (inversion and overlapping)

    Final urface from lofting

    Problems paneling the joint area

  • DESIGN PROCESS: INTERACTIONS WITH THE HAND It can be held parallel to the arm by twining around the wrist or slipping through the fingers. The lantern could also be held up vertically like holding a flag or be cradled on both arms.

    Interactions with the arm

  • PANELING: FROM STANDARD 2D TEMPLATES

    The models are from the standard templates tribasic, wave and box. For the wave template, since my design is an open loop, the ends of the model would have to be closed up manually. After attending the tech-support, I realised that the box template could not be constructed out in reality because it is not possible to create a flat square panel. I like the tribasic model the best because the lines are in different directions and it gives it more dynamism which is similar to my analytical drawing with the zig-zag lines.

    Box panel

    Wave panel

    Tribasic panel

    Analytical Drawing

  • PANELING: 2D CUSTOM DESIGN

    Taking inspiration from my analytical drawing which is made of triangles of different sizes and orientation, I begin to create my custom design I left some holes in the design for light to pass through. I liked the balance between the amount of covered and exposed surfaces. However it is actually not possible to construct it because of the curved surfaces of my model.

    Analytical Drawing

    Custom 2D panelCustom 2D panel

  • PANELING: 2D CUSTOM DESIGN AND EXTRUSION I also did another 2D custom design and 3D extrusion, this time following my emerging model. Although it looked quite fancy and intricate, it is actually impossible to cut out and create this.

    Custom 2D panel

    Custom 2D panel

    Emerging form

    Custom 3D panel

    Custom 3D panel

  • PANELING: EXPLORING THE FIN EDGES

    To create some depth instead of just a 2D design, I used the fin edges tool. I created some fins and then attached some flat panels onto it. However, I found the whole design rather stagnant and boring so I began to cut out random panels. This allows more light to shine out of the lantern instead of just from the small silts of the panels. In addition, breaks away from the rigidity and symmetry of the design. Unfortunately, this is also not feasible to construct because of the square panels.

    Cutting out random panels

    Fin-edges Flat panels

  • PANELING: FROM STANDARD 3D TEMPLATES

    Next I moved onto 3D paneling tools in Rhino. 3D paneling tools will allow me to create a lantern with more volume such that it symbolises growth. I extruded the standard partition pattern. Similar to the fin edge tool, I created flat panels and then deleted some randomly. I also tried deleting alternating panels to analyse the difference in the effects. Lastly, I offset the second grid by a variable distance, using a point attractor and applied the same paneling tools as the previous models. The final model is shown above. This model is better able to bring out the effects of growth that I want to achieve as the extrusion of the elements increases towards the opening. I think that the 3D partition tool is better than the fin edge tool as the extrusions are above my surface in this case, making my lantern larger and I need not worry about having overlapping fin edges. Furthermore, the distance of the extrusions can be varied to create more volume at the upper end. Panels in this case are situated at the base of the extrusions, further emphasising the extrusions instead of being hidden away in the case of the fins edge.

    Deleting alternating panels

    Partition extrusion

    Deleting random panels

    Variable grid offset

  • PANELING: 3D CUSTOM DESIGN

    I did some 3D custom designs of my own using different kinds of triangles. However, the surfaces cannot be joined perfectly. I realised that all the designs had two adjacent surfaces joining each other. Hence, the mesh would be distorted due to the curves on my lantern.

  • PANELING: SETTLING ON TRIBASIC AND PYRAMID TEMPLATE

    Based on previous models and designs, I found that they were either too complicated or they were made up of square panels so they cannot be printed out as a flat panel. Therefore, I will be focusing on the standard tribasic and pyramid templates on the right for modelling my prototypes.

    Pyramid design

    Tribasic design

  • PANELING: OFFSET BORDER

    Using the offset border tool, I created a standard border offset of a fixed width. I like how some areas of my lantern are being offset to produce holes while others still remain as flat panels. In general, the smaller panels on the tail are intact while those on the body are being offset, creating variation. This symbolises growth as the size of the panel openings become larger across the model and the size of the shadows will increase gradually, forming an extension to growth.

    Prototype Lantern1

  • PANELING: OFFSET BORDER

    From the standard 3D pyramid template, I did an offset border. I increased the number of points so that the opening will not be a square. Furthermore, I did a variable offset point for the second grid to make the the object grow and increase in size. I think that the 3D pyramid allows me to explore growth even more because it is able to a create a greater volume at the body.

    Prototype Lantern 2

  • PANELING: LINK TO PRECEDENCE

    I feel that the offset border designs I created is linked to my precedence on Al Bahar Towers in Abu Dhabi. During the daytime, the panels are all fully closed which is similar to the tail of my design. At night, there are openings in the design of the fasade, which can be linked to the offset borders of the body of my design.

    Prototype L