Waste Management Meagan Heath Supervisor, Waste Management Grounds, Fleet, and Waste Management

Download Waste Management Meagan Heath Supervisor, Waste Management Grounds, Fleet, and Waste Management

Post on 19-Jan-2016

72 views

Category:

Documents

1 download

Embed Size (px)

DESCRIPTION

Waste Management Meagan Heath Supervisor, Waste Management Grounds, Fleet, and Waste Management. Tuesday, January 11, 2011. Agenda. Grounds, Fleet and Waste Management Waste Management History ZeroWaste Waste Management Program Tri-bin Recycling Organic Waste Bulk Waste Special Waste - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

TRANSCRIPT

<ul><li><p>Waste Management</p><p>Meagan HeathSupervisor, Waste ManagementGrounds, Fleet, and Waste ManagementTuesday, January 11, 2011</p></li><li><p>*AgendaGrounds, Fleet and Waste ManagementWaste Management HistoryZeroWasteWaste Management ProgramTri-bin RecyclingOrganic WasteBulk WasteSpecial WasteOther Waste DiversionFurther Potential DiversionSafe DisposalWhat Can You Do?</p></li><li><p>Grounds, Fleet, Waste ManagementWho are we?</p><p>What do we do?</p><p>*</p></li><li><p>Was Management History 3 Rs hierarchy * Current: 60% recycling</p><p>Chart1</p><p>22144100</p><p>27488400</p><p>2219300310830</p><p>1952190711570</p><p>17762501070840</p><p>17231301185630</p><p>1798000965000</p><p>20440001340000</p><p>23300001287000</p><p>21880001200000</p><p>22360001320000</p><p>24277901320000</p><p>19147402092250</p><p>19971101854000</p><p>19971102163900</p><p>18260002549000</p><p>19110002856000</p><p>Waste</p><p>Recycling</p><p>Year</p><p>Kilograms (000's)</p><p>Waste Management Data 1987 to 2009</p><p>Keele waste</p><p>Waste Management Statistics (Keele Campus)</p><p>Solid Waste Generation Pattern</p><p>WasteRecyclingRecycling</p><p>WasteGeneratedRecyclingGeneratedas a % of</p><p>CommunityGeneratedper capitaGeneratedper capitaTotal</p><p>YearSize(kg)(kg)(kg)(kg)Waste</p><p>1987$50,0812,214,41044.22000%</p><p>1989$53,4632,748,84051.42000%</p><p>1991$60,5062,219,30036.68310,8306.1412%</p><p>1993$50,6601,952,19038.54711,57014.0527%</p><p>1995$52,9341,776,25033.561,070,84020.2338%</p><p>1997$53,6131,723,13032.141,185,63022.1141%</p><p>1999$57,0391,798,00031.50965,00016.9235%</p><p>2000$58,4552,044,00034.971,340,00022.9240%</p><p>2001$64,7302,330,00058.871,287,00019.8836%</p><p>2002$67,7852,188,00050.141,200,00017.735%</p><p>2003$72,8572,236,00047.781,320,00018.1237%</p><p>2004$78,9222,427,79049.051,320,00016.7335%</p><p>2005$82,1491,914,74023.312,092,25025.4752%</p><p>2006$85,0001,997,11023.501,854,00021.8148%</p><p>2007$85,0001,997,11023.502,163,90025.4652%</p><p>2008$65,0001,826,00028.092,549,00039.258%</p><p>2009$75,0001,911,00025.482,856,0003860%</p><p>Keele waste</p><p>Waste</p><p>Recycling</p><p>Year</p><p>Kilograms (000's)</p><p>Waste Management Data 1987 to 2009</p><p>Per capita</p><p>Waste Production and Recycling per Capita (student population)</p><p>20022003-20042004-20052005-20062006-20072007-20082008-20092009-2010</p><p>Solid Waste produced (excl. 3 Rs initiatives)Kg2,188,0002,236,0002,427,7901,915,0001,997,1101,997,1001,826,0001,911,000</p><p>Recyclables producedKg1,200,0001,320,0001,320,4502,092,0001,969,4502,163,9002,549,0002,856,000</p><p>Student population at York43,63546,79449,49650,69451,42059,68551,98953,205</p><p>Solid waste per capitaKg/Capita50.1447.7849.0537.7838.8433.4635.1235.92</p><p>Recyclables per capitaKg/Capita27.528.2126.6841.2738.336.2649.0353.68</p><p>Waste Production and Recycling per Capita (student population)</p><p>Per capita</p><p>Solid waste per capita</p><p>Recyclables per capita</p><p>Kg per Capita</p></li><li><p>ZeroWaste Triple Bottom Line benefits Target: 65% by 2013 </p></li><li><p>Tri-bin Recycling*</p><p>RECYCLINGGARBAGEPAPER PRODUCTSBOTTLES AND CANSAcceptable: Any type of paper (staples and clips are okay)Boxboard (i.e. cereal boxes)Newspapers &amp; magazinesSticky-notesBooks Acceptable: Glass &amp; plastic bottlesMetal cansMilk &amp; juice cartons &amp; boxesPlastic tubs &amp; lidsAluminum trays Aerosol containerPaint cans Acceptable:Mixed material waste (i.e. coffee cups or binder with plastic &amp; metal parts)Non-recyclable plastics (i.e. takeout containers, cutlery and cups)Plastic bags Biodegradable packagingNot acceptable:No coffee cupsNo biodegradable packagingNo coated paper (with wax, plastic, or foil)No plastic bindersNo transparenciesNo corrugated cardboardNot Acceptable: No coffee cupsNo foam or plastic clamshellsNo biodegradable packagingNo plastic bagsNo aluminum foilNo scrap metal or plasticNo dishwareNo window/mirror glassNo light bulbsNot Acceptable:No recyclable materialsNo organic/food waste No bulk waste: cardboard, packing foam, furnitureNo special waste: batteries, electronics, household hazardous, light bulbs</p></li><li><p>Organic Waste*FOOD VENDORS Kitchen scraps Cooking oil</p><p>INDOOR (KITCHENETTE) ORGANIC WASTE CONTAINEROUTDOOR ORGANIC DIGESTER (COMPOSTER)Acceptable:Any food wasteSoiled napkins or tissuesAcceptable:Fruit &amp; vegetable wasteTea bags &amp; coffee filtersSoiled napkins or tissuesPlain bread or grains (pasta, rice, etc.)Not Acceptable:No gum No packaging (including biodegradable)No animal wasteNo material that is not compostable (i.e. plastic, metal, glass)Not Acceptable:No meat No dairyNo oil or dressingsNo packaging (including biodegradable)No animal wasteWhere: In food waste containers located in all kitchenettesWhere: In organic digesters around campus</p></li><li><p>Bulk WastePaper Towels (Washrooms)</p><p>Clothing</p><p>Books</p><p>Corrugated Cardboard</p><p>Foam Packing Material</p><p>Office Paper &amp; Books</p><p>Furniture*</p></li><li><p>Special WasteBatteries</p><p>E-Waste</p><p>Household Hazardous </p><p>Light Bulbs</p><p>Confidential Paper</p><p>*From on campus use only, please.</p></li><li><p>Other Waste DiversionYard Waste</p><p>Grass Clippings </p><p>Wood</p><p>Concrete</p><p>Asphalt</p><p>Paint</p><p>Household Hazardous</p><p>*Scrap Metal</p><p>White Goods</p><p>Propane Tanks</p><p>Vehicles</p><p>Tires</p><p>Mercury</p><p>Automotive Fluids and Filters</p></li><li><p>Further Potential Reuse/RecyclingConstruction, Renovation and Demolition Waste</p><p> Handled by the contracted construction company</p><p> Currently:Scrap MetalConcrete, Brick, Aggregate</p><p> Potential:CarpetingCeiling TilesDrywall*</p></li><li><p>Safe DisposalFreon (refrigerators)</p><p>PCB (ballasts, transformers)</p><p>Asbestos (building materials)</p><p>Syringes </p><p>*</p></li><li><p>What Can You Do?Reduce</p><p>Reuse</p><p>Recycle</p><p>Rethink*</p><p>Chart2</p><p>49.0526.68</p><p>37.7841.27</p><p>38.8438.3</p><p>33.4636.26</p><p>35.1249.03</p><p>35.9253.68</p><p>Solid waste per capita</p><p>Recyclables per capita</p><p>Kg per Capita</p><p>Keele waste</p><p>Waste Management Statistics (Keele Campus)</p><p>Solid Waste Generation Pattern</p><p>WasteRecyclingRecycling</p><p>WasteGeneratedRecyclingGeneratedas a % of</p><p>CommunityGeneratedper capitaGeneratedper capitaTotal</p><p>YearSize(kg)(kg)(kg)(kg)Waste</p><p>1987$50,0812,214,41044.22000%</p><p>1989$53,4632,748,84051.42000%</p><p>1991$60,5062,219,30036.68310,8306.1412%</p><p>1993$50,6601,952,19038.54711,57014.0527%</p><p>1995$52,9341,776,25033.561,070,84020.2338%</p><p>1997$53,6131,723,13032.141,185,63022.1141%</p><p>1999$57,0391,798,00031.50965,00016.9235%</p><p>2000$58,4552,044,00034.971,340,00022.9240%</p><p>2001$64,7302,330,00058.871,287,00019.8836%</p><p>2002$67,7852,188,00050.141,200,00017.735%</p><p>2003$72,8572,236,00047.781,320,00018.1237%</p><p>2004$78,9222,427,79049.051,320,00016.7335%</p><p>2005$82,1491,914,74023.312,092,25025.4752%</p><p>2006$85,0001,997,11023.501,854,00021.8148%</p><p>2007$85,0001,997,11023.502,163,90025.4652%</p><p>2008$65,0001,826,00028.092,549,00039.258%</p><p>2009$75,0001,911,00025.482,856,0003860%</p><p>Keele waste</p><p>Waste</p><p>Recycling</p><p>Year</p><p>Kilograms (000's)</p><p>Waste Management Data 1987 to 2009</p><p>Per capita</p><p>Waste Production and Recycling per Capita (student population)</p><p>20022003-20042004-20052005-20062006-20072007-20082008-20092009-2010</p><p>Solid Waste produced (excl. 3 Rs initiatives)Kg2,188,0002,236,0002,427,7901,915,0001,997,1101,997,1001,826,0001,911,000</p><p>Recyclables producedKg1,200,0001,320,0001,320,4502,092,0001,969,4502,163,9002,549,0002,856,000</p><p>Student population at York43,63546,79449,49650,69451,42059,68551,98953,205</p><p>Solid waste per capitaKg/Capita50.1447.7849.0537.7838.8433.4635.1235.92</p><p>Recyclables per capitaKg/Capita27.528.2126.6841.2738.336.2649.0353.68</p><p>Waste Production and Recycling per Capita (student population)</p><p>Per capita</p><p>Solid waste per capita</p><p>Recyclables per capita</p><p>Kg per Capita</p></li><li><p>Thank youQuestions?</p><p>www.yorku.ca/csbo/groundsfleetwaste/index.html*</p><p>Hello. My name is Meagan Heath. I am the Waste Management Supervisor in the Grounds, Fleet, and Waste Management unit. Today I will be introducing you to the Universitys waste management program. If you have any questions as I go through, feel free to interrupt me at any time.*The agenda includes:Introducing who we are.Giving a brief history of waste management at York.And describing our waste management program.*Grounds, Fleet and Waste Management is a unit within Campus Services and Business Operations, which provides services to support Yorks academic and research mission, and overall campus life.Grounds, Fleet and Waste Management, which Ill call Grounds, is responsible for grounds maintenance, road and side walk maintenance, snow removal, fleet management, pest management, waste management including recycling, composting and waste reduction initiatives, and other community services such as furniture moves. This presentation will focus on the waste management aspect of our services.*Did you know that York University is responsible for managing all the waste it produces? As large institution, we do not receive waste management services from the municipality, like you probably do at home. We have to take care of it ourselves, which is why our programs are somewhat different from what you may have seen elsewhere.</p><p>In managing our waste, York follows the 3Rs hierarchy. We try to avoid creating waste by prioritizing reduction and reuse, and when waste cant be avoided we try to divert as much as possible through recycling and composting. </p><p>York has long been engaged in a variety of waste diversion activities. In the early-1980s, York was collecting a variety of materials, including paper, scrap metal, corrugated cardboard, and motor oil for recycling, and in the early-1990s, York formalized its waste diversion program. Today this program includes: waste reduction and reuse initiatives, recycling for a board range of materials, onsite and offsite composting, safe disposal of hazardous waste, and, as of 2009, a partnership with the province as a Stewardship Ontario waste depot. As this table illustrates, each year more and more of our waste is sent for recycling.</p><p>Last year, approximately 60% of Yorks total solid waste was sent to be recycled. To put that in perspective, the City of Torontos residential waste management program diverts approximately 45% each year, so were doing pretty well. But, there is always room for improvement. *Our increasing recognition of the importance of reducing and diverting our waste, led to the creation of the ZeroWaste program, and the adoption of the target recycling rate of 65% by 2013. </p><p>The ZeroWaste program, launched in June 2010, has several important elements:Garbage cans were replaced with tri-bin recycling stations, making it equally convenient to recycle as it is to use the garbage.Organic waste bins were placed in most coffee rooms and kitchenettes in academic and administrative buildings. Previously, the public could only compost through outdoor organic digesters, so these indoor bins, made it more convenient to dispose of organic waste for composting.University staff and faculty are required to empty their own desk-side recycling and garbage bins into communal bins. By making individuals take responsibility for their own waste, it is expected that waste generation will be reduced. We have partnered with units such as Residence Life and Food Services to help reduce and divert more waste from major generating areas.And, in association with Communications and Marketing, programs such as Res Race to Zero, and events such as todays, we are working on increasing education around waste management. </p><p>The benefits of the ZeroWaste program address all three elements of the triple bottom line. </p><p>Environmentally:Through education and greater personal responsibility, overall waste generation should be reduced.More recyclables and organic waste will be captured for diversion, reducing the amount sent to landfill.</p><p>Economically:York will have a cost savings associated with lower disposal fees for recyclables than for garbage.Waste reduction will also provide important cost savings, both in terms of reduced asset consumption, and reduced disposal fees.</p><p>Socially:Because Custodial staff no longer have to empty each individual desk-side waste bin, there will be a productivity gain. This will allow for a reallocation of resources, ensuring more reliable service execution, resulting in a cleaner, more pleasant workplace. It is important to note that no one is being laid off as a result of this program. Its intention is the reallocate labour, not reduce the workforce. </p><p>Now, Ill quickly review the main elements of our waste management operations.</p><p>Who can name 5 items that are collected for recycling at York?Much of the Universitys waste diversion program is achieved through the tri-bin system, which covers the indoors and outdoors of York Universitys Keele and Glendon campuses. Tri-bins consist of grouping of three waste receptacles, for the collection of source-separated recyclables (1) paper products and (2) bottles and cans, as well as a third bin for (3) non-recyclable garbage. Materials should be sorted and disposed of according to categories described in this chart, which can be found on our website.</p><p>*Composting is an important part of Yorks waste diversion program we have several different means to capture organic waste: Approximately 60 Organic Digesters (a.k.a. composters) are located around the outdoors of Keele and Glendon campuses. These digesters can be used by the York community to dispose of any fruit or vegetable waste. The open-bottomed digesters are in direct contact with the soil so the food gets broken down by worms and other critters. Once per year the compost is spread around naturalized parts of campus. Any food waste with meat, dairy, or oil poses a pest and odour risk, and is not suitable for the digesters. The digesters are large black cones as pictured here, and the next slide maps out where they are located on Keele campus. </p><p>As a part of the Zero Waste program, all kitchenettes and coffee rooms have been outfitted with a container to collect food waste for composting. The kitchenette organic container is pictured here. The organic waste from these containers is for sent to an off-site industrial aerobic composting facility. The resultant compost has various applications, including soil amendments or landfill cover. </p><p>The types of food waste that should go into the indoor kitchenette organic waste container and outdoor digester are different. This chart, which can be found on our website, details what goes into each kind of organic bin.</p><p>As well, all food vendors on campus are required to collect organic waste kitchen scraps, which also sent to an off-site composting facility. Food vendors also must collect their used cooking oil, which is reprocessed as animal feed by Wardlaws Poultry Farm.*We collect many bulk items for recycling. I can talk about any of them in greater detail if anyone is interested.</p><p>Washroom waste bins in washrooms with paper towel dispensers are for paper towels only, which are collected for recycling, unless labelled Garbage. Please do not contaminate with other waste. York University continues to reduce paper towel consumption by replacing towel dispenses with new generation hand dryers in high use areas.Clothing: Donate for reuse in the two clothing bins are location on Keele campus (see the Waste Diversion Map for locations)Books: Donate for reuse. York University's Bookstore will often buy back used text books, and sell them at a discounted price to students. Corrugated cardboard (with a ruffled inner layer): Flattened and deposited in the specially marked blue containers found at any loading dock or recycling depot. Foam packing material (i.e. the blocks used to package electronics not foam peanuts): Bag and leave on any loading dock.Office paper and books: Do not overfill communal r...</p></li></ul>