walk a mile in my shoes: genealogy crash course for librarians · pdf file...

Click here to load reader

Post on 08-Jul-2020

0 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • Walk a Mile in My Shoes: Genealogy Crash Course for Librarians

    Presented by:

    Tamika Strong

    IT Program Manager, Georgia Public Library Service

    Georgia COMO 2015

    October 8, 2015

  • CLASS OBJECTIVE

     To assist attendees in getting a basic

    understanding of the first steps in tracing ones

    genealogy and documenting their family history

    with a focus on using census records.

  • Why Would a You Want to Trace Your

    Family History?

  • STEP #1 – Set a Goal Know Where you want to go.

     Determine what you want to learn about your family.

     Define a long and short term goal.

     Write down the goals. Post them in your workspace.

     Try to stay focus on them.

  • Research Goals

     Short Term

    ◦ Example: Find census records for maternal

    grandmother.

     Long Term

    ◦ Example: Trace maternal family line to 1870.

  • STEP #2: Getting Started

     Write down everything you know.

    ◦ Names

    ◦ Dates – Birth, Marriage, Divorce, Death

    ◦ Places where the family lived

     Record the information on Family Group

    Sheets and Pedigree Charts.

  • PEDIGREE CHART

     Captures your direct ancestors, parents, grandparents, great-

    grandparents, great-great-grandparents, etc.

     You are #1 on the chart.

     Your father’s line starts with #2.

     Your mother’s line starts with #3.

     Men are even numbers – 2, 4, 6, etc.

     Women are odd numbers – 3, 5, 7, etc.

     Women are placed on the chart under the maiden name. If

    unknown then leave blank.

  • FAMILY GROUP SHEETS

     Captures the family units – parents and children.

     Create a Family Group Sheet for every couple or

    mother-father pair.

  • Step #3 Family resources

    Collect Family Documents

    ◦ Family Bibles

    ◦ Birth Certificates

    ◦ Marriage Certificates

    ◦ Divorce Decrees

    ◦ Funeral Programs

    ◦ Obituaries

    ◦ Death Certificates

    ◦ Military Records

    ◦ Cemetery/Burial Information

    ◦ Pictures

    ◦ Wills

    ◦ Land Deeds

    ◦ Etc.

  • Step #3 Family resources

    Collect Family History

     Figure out the person in your family who knows a lot of

    your family’s history.

     Interview relatives, especially the elders

    ◦ Record the interview if possible, audio or video

    ◦ Ask to make copies of pictures, funeral programs,

    obituaries, etc.

    ◦ Be prepared - some people may be unwilling to share

    information or materials.

  • Step #4: Census Research

    Find Your Folks in the Census  Census Records

    ◦ Start from the present and work backwards starting with yourself.

    ◦ Happens every tens years from 1790.

    ◦ 1890 Census – lost to water damage due to a fire; some parts

    survived.

    ◦ Information recorded in the census varied from each census year.

    ◦ Special Schedules were included during certain census years, i.e.

    Slave Schedules in 1850 and 1860 Census.

  • Step #4: Census Research

    Find Your Folks in the Census  Census Records

    ◦ 1870 Census – first time most African Americans were listed by

    name.

    ◦ 1880 Census – showed family relationships for the first time.

    ◦ 1900 Census – included birth month and date

    ◦ 1940 Census  Released April 2012  Fully indexed by August of 2012  Denotes informant with an asterisk.

  • Step #4: Census Research

    Find Your Folks in the Census  Census Records

    ◦ Ancestry.com $$

    ◦ Ancestry Library Edition

     Only available for use inside of libraries and archives

    ◦ Familysearch.org

    ◦ HeritageQuest

     Available through GALILEO; Can access from home

  • Step #4: Census Research

    Find Your Folks in the Census

     Look at the individual’s birth date. That will determine which available censuses the person should be included.

     Example: Maggie Bell Printup (1928 – 2000)

    ◦ Should be able to find her in the

     1940 Census

     1930 Census

  • Step #4: Census Research

    Find Your Folks in the Census

     Example: Maggie Bell Printup (1928 – 2000)

    ◦ 1940 Census

  • Step #4: Census Research

    Find Your Folks in the Census

     Example: Maggie Bell Printup (1928 – 2000)

    ◦ 1930 Census

  • Step #4: Census Research

    Find Your Folks in the Census

     Census Search Tips

    ◦ Start from the latest census and work backwards.

    ◦ Always look at the original document, not just the

    transcription.

    ◦ Ages may not be accurate.

    ◦ Be mindful of Nicknames or name abbreviations, i.e.

    Jno – John, Maggie – Margaret; Mag – Maggie

  • Step #5: Increase Knowledge - Books

     Dowell, David R. 2011. Crash Course in Genealogy. Santa Barbara, Calif.: Libraries Unlimited.

     Moore, Dahrl Elizabeth. 1998. The Librarian's Genealogy

    Notebook: A Guide to Resources. Chicago: American Library Association.

     Simpson, Jack. 2008. Basics Genealogy Reference: A Librarian’s

    Guide. Westport, Conn.: Libraries Unlimited.  Swan, James. 2004. The Librarian's Guide to Genealogical

    Services and Research. New York: Neal-Schuman Publishers.

  • Step #5: Increase Knowledge – Online Resources

     Ancestry.com Learning Center ◦ http://learn.ancestry.com/Home/HMLND.aspx

     Familysearch.org Learning Center ◦ https://familysearch.org/learn

     Genealogy.about.com ◦ http://genealogy.about.com/od/make_family_tree/u/learn.htm

     Genealogy.com Learning Center ◦ http://genealogy.com/genehelp.html

     YouTube (search for Genealogy) ◦ Ancestry, FamilySearch and other companies and individuals have

    videos. I really like the Five Minute Finds series by Ancestry for quick lessons.

  • Research Tips

     Select a single surname, individual, or family unit to focus on.

     Set a research goal.

     Complete and update Pedigree Charts and Family Group Sheets to reflect new information.

     Create and keep a research log or journal to track your progress.

     Get organized and stay organized.

     Make copies, either paper or electronic, of the original documents so you will have a copy.

  • Research Tips cont.

     Take small steps…don’t overwhelm yourself. Genealogy is a lifelong hobby!

     Get organized and stay organized!!!!

     Learn as you go using webinars, classes,

    attending genealogy group meetings, etc.

     Remember to have fun!!!

  • Local Repositories

     Your Local Library

     GPLS Library Directories ◦ http://www.georgialibraries.org/directories/

     Georgia Archives ◦ http://www.georgiaarchives.org/

     National Archives at Atlanta ◦ http://www.archives.gov/atlanta/

     Family History Centers ◦ https://familysearch.org/locations/

  • Local Historical and Genealogical Groups

     Georgia Archives - Directory of Historical and Cultural Organizations ◦ http://apps.georgiaarchives.org/GHRAB/

     Georgia Genealogical Society (GGS) ◦ http://www.gagensociety.org

     Genealogical Societies in Georgia ◦ http://www.gagensociety.org/research/societies

     Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society (AAHGS) – Metro

    Atlanta Chapter ◦ http://www.aahgsatl.org/

  • HAVE FUN!!!!!

    Source: http://www.roadkilltshirts.com/Assets/ProductImages/PS_1081_SHOOK_TREE.jpg

  • PRESENTER INFORMATION

    Tamika Strong

    IT Program Manager

    Georgia Public Library Service

    tstrong@georgialibraries.org

    A copy of the PowerPoint used in the presentation can be

    found here: gagenealogy.wordpress.com/presentations

    Walk a Mile in My Shoes: �Genealogy Crash Course for Librarians CLASS OBJECTIVE Why Would a You Want to Trace Your�Family History? STEP #1 – Set a Goal�Know Where you want to go. Research Goals STEP #2: �Getting Started� PEDIGREE CHART Slide Number 8 FAMILY GROUP SHEETS Slide Number 10 Step #3�Family resources�Collect Family Documents Step #3�Family resources�Collect Family History Step #4:�Census Research�Find Your Folks in the Census Step #4:�Census Research�Find Your Folks in the Census Step #4:�Census Research�Find Your Folks in the Census Step #4:�Census Research�Find Your Folks in the Census Step #4:�Census Research�Find Your Folks in the Census Step #4:�Census Research�Find Your Folks in the Census Step #4:�Census Research�Find Your Fol