underwater remotely operated vehicle (rov)

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Underwater Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) Team members: Sital Khatiwada, Shawn Swist, Matt Falbe, John Wallace, John Mccormack, Buddy Young, Lucas Lopez, Robert Swan Project Advisors: Dr. May-Win Thein, Dr. Wayne Smith, Collette Powers UNH ROV is an interdisciplinary engineering team dedicated towards the design and fabri- caon of an underwater remotely operated vehicle. This year’s iteraon of the ROV, known as Siren, was designed with constraints provided by the Internaonal MATE ROV Compeon and research specificaons, such as size, weight, power consumpon, and system capabilies. Design models of Siren were conceived through computer-aided modeling and numerical simulaons, and verified through prototyping and tesng pro- cesses. Several innovaons to legacy ROV designs include an overhauled propulsion sys- tem, further operator interacvity through virtual reality (VR) technology, faster onboard computer, and an opmized control plaorm. Ongoing tasks include implementaon of feedback control and communicaon with an Autonomous Surface Vehicle (ASV). Through innovave ideas, analycal tools, and robust engineering design, Siren presents an advanced underwater ROV plaorm capable of many aspects of research, compeon, and industrial applicaon. Modular Aluminum 80/20 Frame Quick component reposioning Enre frame can be rescaled as need arises Slide fastener system allows fine trim adjustment 6015-T5 Aluminum: 200 MPa Yield Strength 8 Thrusters with 2.87 lbf thrust force each available Single tube waterght electronics enclosure Special Thanks to: Dr. Marn Renken (Keyport NUWC), Tara Hicks Johnson, Sco Campbell, Joseph Gabriel Tradional vs. Angled Thruster orientaon tested Simulaon performed on both orientaons Angled orientaon found to provide x thrust Orientaon also provides complex maneuvers Allows for high precision during operaon Lightweight, compact underwater unit with high computaonal capabilies Modular chassis design with focus on ease of transportaon Addional degrees of freedom (DOF) for movement Opmal thrust and precision maneuverability without large power requirements Feedback control system capable of controlling depth and possibly orientaon Further improvement to user interface through implementaon of an Oculus Riſt Slight posive buoyancy for recovery during system failure Valve system for easy aachment and removal of electronics tray endcap Center of mass and buoyancy adjustment system Inial design showed potenal of heat buildup within electronics tray Heat simulaons performed with com- putaonal soſtware USB Extenders found to generate most heat while system is under load Aluminum electronics tray design allows for large heat sink within the tray Ambient water temperature adds fur- ther cooling capabilies Simulated under worst-case scenario, presented with no heat issues Mechanical arm controlled from surface through Leap 2-DOF requirement: rotaon and grip Moon of arm achieved through servos Servos not inherently waterproof, achieved through dis- assembly and reassembly in mineral oil Servos sealed with O-rings and Locte for waterproof as- surance Blue Robocs Bar30 Sensor allows for pressure, tempera- ture, and depth measurement with high accuracy Depth measurement will be used for depth feedback control Xbox 360 Controller serves as main user input device Buons mapped to specific funcons of ROV Camera feed transmied to Oculus Riſt Virtual Reality (VR) environment Oculus HUD to provide higher degree of accuracy and depth percepon Leap Moon Controller integrated into VR environ- ment Leap allows for precision control of mechanical arma- ture SSH-based system allows for system diagnoscs, sys- tem reboot, and other troubleshoong from surface Power supply provides primary power to all systems 48 V power stepped down to 12 V and 5 V, used by thrusters and microcontrollers, re- specvely Thrust modulaon provided by Raspberry Pi, Arduino MEGA controls pressure sensor and manipulator Camera feed transferred through isolated USB extender to surface staon All control programs executed through the Pi Drive code and data transfer modules ini- alized upon ROV startup Real-me communicaon between PC-Raspberry Pi–Arduino MEGA Sensor feedback directly to Pi and PC Feedback depth control code allows ROV to hold posion at desired depth MATE Competition Internaonal ROV Compeon, this year hosted at NASA Johnson Space Center Neu- tral Buoyancy Lab in Houston, TX Mission Tasks Mission to Europa Equipment Recovery Forensic Fingerprinng Deepwater Coral Study Securing an oil wellhead Research Applications ROV Leader-Follower System Use a signal light and opcal detecon array to control a fleet of ROVs ROV—ASV Communicaon Cross plaorm communicaon be- tween ROV and ASV teams Inial ‘ping’ tests for proof-of-concept ROV flashes a light, ASV sees the flash and replays the flash above the surface

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Underwater Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) Team members: Sital Khatiwada, Shawn Swist, Matt Falbe, John Wallace, John Mccormack, Buddy Young, Lucas Lopez, Robert Swan
Project Advisors: Dr. May-Win Thein, Dr. Wayne Smith, Collette Powers
UNH ROV is an interdisciplinary engineering team dedicated towards the design and fabri- cation of an underwater remotely operated vehicle. This year’s iteration of the ROV, known as Siren, was designed with constraints provided by the International MATE ROV Competition and research specifications, such as size, weight, power consumption, and system capabilities. Design models of Siren were conceived through computer-aided modeling and numerical simulations, and verified through prototyping and testing pro- cesses. Several innovations to legacy ROV designs include an overhauled propulsion sys- tem, further operator interactivity through virtual reality (VR) technology, faster onboard computer, and an optimized control platform. Ongoing tasks include implementation of feedback control and communication with an Autonomous Surface Vehicle (ASV). Through innovative ideas, analytical tools, and robust engineering design, Siren presents an advanced underwater ROV platform capable of many aspects of research, competition, and industrial application.
Modular Aluminum 80/20 Frame
Slide fastener system allows fine trim adjustment
6015-T5 Aluminum: 200 MPa Yield Strength
8 Thrusters with 2.87 lbf thrust force each
available
Single tube watertight electronics enclosure
Special Thanks to: Dr. Martin Renken (Keyport NUWC), Tara Hicks Johnson, Scott Campbell, Joseph Gabriel
Traditional vs. Angled Thruster orientation tested
Simulation performed on both orientations
Angled orientation found to provide x thrust
Orientation also provides complex maneuvers
Allows for high precision during operation
Lightweight, compact underwater unit with high computational capabilities
Modular chassis design with focus on ease of transportation
Additional degrees of freedom (DOF) for movement
Optimal thrust and precision maneuverability without large power requirements
Feedback control system capable of controlling depth and possibly orientation
Further improvement to user interface through implementation of an Oculus Rift
Slight positive buoyancy for recovery during system failure
Valve system for easy attachment and removal of electronics tray endcap
Center of mass and buoyancy adjustment system
Initial design showed potential of heat buildup within electronics tray
Heat simulations performed with com- putational software
USB Extenders found to generate most heat while system is under load
Aluminum electronics tray design allows for large heat sink within the tray
Ambient water temperature adds fur- ther cooling capabilities
Simulated under worst-case scenario, presented with no heat issues
Mechanical arm controlled from surface through Leap
2-DOF requirement: rotation and grip
Motion of arm achieved through servos
Servos not inherently waterproof, achieved through dis- assembly and reassembly in mineral oil
Servos sealed with O-rings and Loctite for waterproof as- surance
Blue Robotics Bar30 Sensor allows for pressure, tempera- ture, and depth measurement with high accuracy
Depth measurement will be used for depth feedback control
Xbox 360 Controller serves as main user input device
Buttons mapped to specific functions of ROV
Camera feed transmitted to Oculus Rift Virtual Reality (VR) environment
Oculus HUD to provide higher degree of accuracy and depth perception
Leap Motion Controller integrated into VR environ- ment
Leap allows for precision control of mechanical arma- ture
SSH-based system allows for system diagnostics, sys- tem reboot, and other troubleshooting from surface
Power supply provides primary power to
all systems
48 V power stepped down to 12 V and 5 V,
used by thrusters and microcontrollers, re-
spectively
Pi, Arduino MEGA controls pressure sensor
and manipulator
All control programs executed through the
Pi
tialized upon ROV startup
Feedback depth control code allows ROV
to hold position at desired depth
MATE Competition
hosted at NASA Johnson Space Center Neu-
tral Buoyancy Lab in Houston, TX
Mission Tasks
ROV—ASV Communication
ROV flashes a light, ASV sees the flash
and replays the flash above the surface